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It is the students' responsibility to verify where and to whom they report before the start of each course no later than the Friday before the start of the rotation.

Tampa Instructions

Students in the SELECT (LVHN) program who rotate at one of the Tampa campus sites must contact Courtney Johns at cjohns2@health.usf.edu 8 weeks before the start of the Tampa elective (with the following information) to ensure that all appropriate hospital credentials are in place.

  • Name of elective
  • Site of elective
  • Dates of elective

LVHN Instructions

Students in the Core (Tampa) program who rotate at one of the LVHN campus sites should do the following:

Drop/Add open 5/1/17 - 01/31/18

  1. Drop/add requests must be submitted at least one month in advance of the rotation.
  2. Log in to https://hsccf.hsc.usf.edu/comdropadd/ with the same user ID and password you use to log on to your USF health email account.
  3. Before you can make changes, you must select your Year 4 collegium advisor from the drop down list. If your advisor is not on the list, please contact me, and I will have your advisor added.
  4. Once you select your collegium advisor, you may view your schedule and begin selecting courses to drop and add. To add courses, you may search using several filters. Courses are listed under the same departments and sites that are located in the Electives Catalog. If you are unable to find a course, please adjust your filtering criteria. You may need to broaden the scope.
  5. Even though you have submitted a request, it is not approved until you receive an email from the Office of Registrar. Your schedule will not be changed until then. Your advisor and the course coordinator must both approve your request, then I will review your schedule and make changes as appropriate. Please make sure to review the requirements for the fourth year (Graduation and Track Requirements) to make sure your new schedule will be in compliance. When reviewing drop/add requests, I will take your entire schedule into consideration. For example, you will not be permitted to drop a required course unless you have submitted a request to add it in a different period. You may also view the Fourth Year Academic Calendar to determine the dates for each period.
    Drop/add closes 01/31/18.

  6. Electives Open/Closed Report - Please refer to this report when looking for courses that might have availability. This report will be updated on a weekly basis and does not reflect any pending requests still in the system. This report is meant to serve as a guideline.  

    Electives_OpenClosed_Report 1.19.18.pdf 

     Instructions for Reading Report

    Please note: Changes are not automatic. There are three levels of approval (coordinator, advisor, registrar). Requests are typically processed within a 2-3 day window, but may be a little longer at the beginning of the year when many students make changes.

    The Electives Open/Closed Report lists each elective in each period, how many slots are offered, and how many have already been taken. For example:

    Period

    Prefix

    Numb

    Title

    Site

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

    7

    8

    9

    10

    11

    12

    4 WEEK PERIOD

    MEL

    xxxx

    Elective Y

    USFMS

    8/3

    0/0

    0/0

    0/0

    8/6

    8/7

    0/0

    0/0

    8/6

    8/8

    8/5

    0/0

    Elective Y is offered in periods 1, 5, 6, 9, 10, and 11. (Period 12 is an extra month for remediation purposes.) There are a total of 8 slots available in each of those periods. 3 students are enrolled in period 1, so there are 5 slots available. Period 10 is full.


    For courses offered as a two-week rotation, the total number of spots in one period cannot exceed the number of slots. For example:

    Period

    Prefix

    Numb

    Title

    Site

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    6

    7

    8

    9

    10

    11

    12

    2 WEEK PERIOD A

    MEL

    xxxx

    Elective Z

    TGH

    2/0

    2/0

    2/0

    2/0

    2/1

    2/0

    2/0

    2/0

    2/0

    2/1

    2/0

    0/0

    2 WEEK PERIOD B

    MEL

    xxxx

    Elective Z

    TGH

    2/0

    2/0

    2/0

    2/0

    2/1

    2/0

    2/1

    2/0

    2/0

    2/1

    2/0

    0/0

    4 WEEK PERIOD

    MEL

    xxxx

    Elective Z

    TGH

    2/0

    2/0

    2/0

    2/0

    2/1

    2/1

    2/1

    2/1

    2/2

    2/0

    2/1

    0/0

    Period A is the first half of the period, and Period B is the second half. In Period 5, the enrollment adds up to 2 people for the four weeks, one four week person, one two week person in A, and one two week person in B. For this course, there cannot be more than 2 students enrolled at any one time. Based on the report, in period 10, either one more student could register for the full four weeks, or one more student could be in both Period A and Period B

Special instructions for Pediatrics electives in Tampa

  • Any request to Drop/Add a Pediatric elective rotation must be FINALIZED AND COMMUNICATED TO THE ROTATION SITE no later than 1 month (30 days) prior to the start date of the rotation.
  • Therefore, a student MUST submit these requests at least 45 DAYS prior to the start date of the rotation.
  • In the event of extenuating circumstances where a student must drop a course after the designated drop period, the drop form requires the signature (non-electronic) of the Director of Pediatric Electives/Pediatric Track or his designee.  He/she should meet with the director to request this and discuss the reasons for doing so.

 

Course Key

See Course Key for a definition of sites.

Dept
Division
Course
Site
Periods
Pre-req
Max Enroll
Min Enroll
Hours/Wk
Weeks
Faculty
Type
Anat
 
 BMS 8187 Advanced Human Anatomy
Contact:
Orhan Arslan, DVM, PhD
Director of Anatomy
Department of Pathology and Cell Biology
12901 Bruce B Downs Blvd MDC 2012
Tampa, FL 33612
(813) 974-0636
oarslan@health.usf.edu
Report to:
MDC 2510
Tuesdays and Thursdays
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
This course entails supervised regional dissection, discussion of the clinical relevance of the identified structures, participation in gross anatomy laboratory sessions and independent case-based presentations.
Syllabus
Objectives:
This course is designed to provide senior students with the opportunity to perform an in-depth study of anatomy in relation to surgical fields and other clinically relevant disciplines such as radiology and emergency medicine. It enables students to master the delicate relationships of anatomical structures through supervised step-by-step dissections. It is expected, that prospective students will be able to correlate structural organization of human body to the interpretation of disease processes. Students will be able to participate in teaching anatomy to junior medical students in an interactive laboratory environment.
Evaluation:
Evaluation is based on completion of the assigned dissection and active participation in anatomy laboratory teaching. Minimum of 5 PowerPoint presentations detailing a series of clinical vignettes with complete history, laboratory values, differential diagnosis and discussions are required. These vignettes must emphasize the importance of structural relationships of the affected organs and the anatomic basis of the conditions discussed.
USFMS
 1, 3 - 11
None
No Limit
0
44
2,4
Arslan, Orhan
Basic Science 
Anat
 
 MDE 8521 Applied Head and Neck Anatomy
 
Contact:
 Orhan Arslan, DVM, PhD
Director of Anatomy
Department of Pathology and Cell Biology
12901 Bruce B Downs Blvd MDC 2012
Tampa, FL 33612
(813) 974-0636
oarslan@health.usf.edu
 
Report to:
MDC 2510
Tuesdays and Thursdays
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM
The course will demonstrate and enforce the interface between clinical and foundational science, and reinforce skills of literature review and mechanistic thinking about clinical disorders associated with the head and neck region. Specifically, students will review the anatomy of the head and neck through laboratory dissection. Students will be able to correlate common clinical conditions, imaging studies, and surgical procedures associated with these regions.
Syllabus
Goals and Objectives:
The overall goal of this course is to provide a thorough review of human head and neck anatomy from a clinical perspective. Topics covered during this elective will include anterior and posterior triangles of the neck, associate vasculature and nerves, the larynx and pharynx, the face, eye and orbit, the ear, the cranial bfossae, brain and associated vessel, dural sinuses, meninges, and the cranial nerves, Students will be able to enhance their knowledge of topographic anatomy.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated on the basis of their course participation in discussion, dissection and on their written presentation of a chosen and approved research project.
Written presentations must revolve around the clinical applications of the head and neck anatomy. A brief coverage of the salient features of the head and neck that pertain to the selected topic of presentation. Presentation must be original and supported with 5 research papers and not textbook references. Topics on new surgical techniques, complication of certain surgical procedures and anatomical basis of these procedures can be included. PowerPoint presentations must be organized to include: introduction, case history, physical exam, laboratory studies if applicable, differential diagnosis, diagnosis and treatment methodologies. A balance between text and images must be attained. A total of 15 slides is recommended, but not less than 12.
USFMS
 1, 3 - 11
None
No Limit
6
40
2
Arslan, Orhan
Basic Science 
Anat
 
 MDE 8522 Applied Anat of the MSK System
 
Contact:
 
Orhan Arslan, DVM, PhD
Director of Anatomy
Department of Pathology and Cell Biology
12901 Bruce B Downs Blvd MDC 2012
Tampa, FL 33612
(813) 974-0636
oarslan@health.usf.edu
Report to:
MDC 2510
Tuesdays and Thursdays
9:00 AM - 12:00 PM


Students will review the osseous anatomy of the extremities, characteristics of the synovial joints through the use of assigned, lectures, and dissection guide. Students will have the opportunity to expand their knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy as it relates to clinical practice, common imaging studies, and surgical procedures.
Syllabus
Goals and Objectives: 
The overall goal of this course is to provide a thorough review of human osteology and musculoskeletal anatomy from a clinical perspective. The objective is to enable students to recognize the anatomical basis of common musculoskeletal disorders and associated surgical procedures. Specifically, the gross anatomy of the back and limbs will be reviewed, and the clinical relevance will be emphasized.
Evaluation:
Evaluation of the student’s final written presentations in a case-Based format with the following parameters:
  1. A minimum of 12 slides is required for each of the PowerPoint Presentation.
  2. Each presentation must be balanced between text, data, and images.
  3. Presented topics should be carefully selected based on its significance, relevance and impact on knowledge base of students
  4. Each presentation must encompass a detailed case history, manifestations, physical diagnosis, differential diagnosis, therapeutic methodologies and discussion.
Laboratory dissection will conducted on Tuesdays and Thursdays between 10:00 AM- 12:00 PM unless otherwise indicated.
USFMS
 1, 3 - 11
None
No Limit
6
40
2
Arslan, Orhan
Basic Science 
Anat
 
MEL 9999A Indep Study - Anatomy
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
No Limit
0
44
2,4
Arslan, Orhan
Indep Study
Anesth
 
 MDE 8700 Anesthesiology Elective
Contact:
Nan.Schwann@lvhn.org
484-866-9581
Objective:
The primary objective of this course is to introduce the student(s) to the practical/hands on approach to anesthesiology with emphasis on airway management, respiratory physiology, cardiovascular physiology, perioperative management, and invasive procedures. 


Medical students are expected to make preoperative rounds with the anesthesiology staff on patients scheduled for surgery. Preoperative examinations and assessments of patients are expected. Participation in the decisions of anesthetic drugs and anesthesia choice are required. Students will assist in the preparation of the patients for surgery which include starting IV’s, connecting monitoring equipment, learning the pharmacology of various anesthestic agents, and learn to problem solve basic anesthetic situations. Emphasis on airway management include placement of LMAs, LTDs, masking patients, and intubation via direct laryngoscopy and video laryngosocpy. Invasive procedures include arterial line insertions and central line placement. An introduction to peripheral regional blocks will be included for those students that express an interest. Students will follow their patients throughout the anesthetic care into the postoperative recovery for continuity of care. 

The course is directed towards medical students who plan to enter Anesthesiology, Critical Care Medicine, or Emergency Medicine. The course emphasis will be tailored to the medical specialty the extern expects to enter and the skill set of the student. Excellent hand-eye coordination is a must for this course, since students are expected to perform procedures on patients.
Evaluation:
Oral, practical, and/or written evaluations of medical students will include clinical performance, medical knowledge, professionalism, motivation, and ability to problem solve.
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
50
2,4
Schwann, Nan
Clinical
Anesth
 
 MDE 8700 Anesthesiology Elective
Contact:
Dr. Raymond Evans
Raymond.Evans@moffitt.org
LaCetta Cline | 813-745-1674 | LaCetta.Cline@moffitt.org
Second Floor MCB Anesthesia Department
12902 Magnolia Dr., Tampa, FL 33612
Objective:
The primary objective of this course is to introduce the student(s) to the practical/hands on approach to anesthesiology with emphasis on airway management, respiratory physiology, cardiovascular physiology, perioperative management, and invasive procedures. 

Medical students are expected to make preoperative rounds with the anesthesiology staff on patients scheduled for surgery. Preoperative examinations and assessments of patients are expected. Participation in the decisions of anesthetic drugs and anesthesia choice are required. Students will assist in the preparation of the patients for surgery which include starting IV’s, connecting monitoring equipment, learning the pharmacology of various anesthestic agents, and learn to problem solve basic anesthetic situations. Emphasis on airway management include placement of LMAs, LTDs, masking patients, and intubation via direct laryngoscopy and video laryngosocpy. Invasive procedures include arterial line insertions and central line placement. An introduction to peripheral regional blocks will be included for those students that express an interest. Students will follow their patients throughout the anesthetic care into the postoperative recovery for continuity of care. 

The course is directed towards medical students who plan to enter Anesthesiology, Critical Care Medicine, or Emergency Medicine. The course emphasis will be tailored to the medical specialty the extern expects to enter and the skill set of the student. Excellent hand-eye coordination is a must for this course, since students are expected to perform procedures on patients.
Evaluation:
Oral, practical, and/or written evaluations of medical students will include clinical performance, medical knowledge, professionalism, motivation, and ability to problem solve.
MCC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
50
4
Evans, Raymond
Clinical
Anesth
 
 MDE 8700 Anesthesiology Elective
T-VAH
Second floor Anesthesia Department
James A. Haley VA Medical Center
13000 Bruce B. Downs Blvd., Tampa, FL 33612
1st Contact Person: Layne Jackson
Telephone: 1-813-978-5946
E-mail: Layne.Jackson@va.gov
Room: 2D-207

2nd Contact Person: Dr. Lee

Telephone: 1-813-972-2000 ext. 5157 
E-mail:   Leland.Lee@va.gov
Room: 2C-207
Objective:
The primary objective of this course is to introduce the student(s) to the practical/hands on approach to anesthesiology with emphasis on airway management, respiratory physiology, cardiovascular physiology, perioperative management, and invasive procedures. 


Medical students are expected to make preoperative rounds with the anesthesiology staff on patients scheduled for surgery. Preoperative examinations and assessments of patients are expected. Participation in the decisions of anesthetic drugs and anesthesia choice are required. Students will assist in the preparation of the patients for surgery which include starting IV’s, connecting monitoring equipment, learning the pharmacology of various anesthestic agents, and learn to problem solve basic anesthetic situations. Emphasis on airway management include placement of LMAs, LTDs, masking patients, and intubation via direct laryngoscopy and video laryngosocpy. Invasive procedures include arterial line insertions and central line placement. An introduction to peripheral regional blocks will be included for those students that express an interest. Students will follow their patients throughout the anesthetic care into the postoperative recovery for continuity of care. 

The course is directed towards medical students who plan to enter Anesthesiology, Critical Care Medicine, or Emergency Medicine. The course emphasis will be tailored to the medical specialty the extern expects to enter and the skill set of the student. Excellent hand-eye coordination is a must for this course, since students are expected to perform procedures on patients.
Evaluation:
Oral, practical, and/or written evaluations of medical students will include clinical performance, medical knowledge, professionalism, motivation, and ability to problem solve.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
50
4
Kambam, Jayakumar
Clinical
Anesth
 
MEL 7320Z Externship - Anesthesiology
EXT
 1 - 10
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
44
4
Klein, Malcolm
Externship
Card
 
 MDE 8224 Consultative Cardiology
This elective offers an opportunity to develop skills in the evaluation of patients referred for cardiology consultation. The students will participate in the evaluation of patients referred for cardiology consultation and will assist with the integration of the general medical data base with data gathered by both noninvasive (electrocardiography, ambulatory electrocardiography, stress testing) and invasive hemodynamic techniques, where indicated. This course allows the student to interpret a large number of electrocardiograms under the supervision of the attending staff. Staff attending review will provide individual instruction. Attendance at various other weekly Cardiology Department teaching conferences is required.
Evaluation:
The faculty will make performance evaluations from data derived from clinical discussions and didactic presentations by the student.
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
44
2,4
Jacobs, Larry
Clinical
Card
 
 MDE 8224 Consultative Cardiology
At TGH and T-VAH: This elective offers an opportunity to develop skills in the evaluation of patients referred for cardiology consultation at the VA and Tampa General Hospital. The students will participate in the evaluation of patients referred for cardiology consultation and will assist with the integration of the general medical data base with data gathered by both noninvasive (electrocardiography, ambulatory electrocardiography, stress testing) and invasive hemodynamic techniques, where indicated. This course allows the student to interpret a large number of electrocardiograms under the supervision of the attending staff. Staff attending review will provide individual instruction. Attendance at various other weekly Cardiology Department teaching conferences is required.
Evaluation:
The faculty will make performance evaluations from data derived from clinical discussions and didactic presentations by the student.
TGH
1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
44
2,4
Labovitz, Arthur
Clinical
Card
 
 MDE 8224 Consultative Cardiology
At BP-VAH: This rotation will consist of direct exposure to clinical care of patients in the inpatient and outpatient settings. A low student to instructor ratio will facilitate a nourishing learning environment. Students will evaluate patients with all categories of cardiac disease, and cardiac history taking and examination skills will be honed. Additionally, students will be involved with interpretation of studies including echocardiograms, Holter monitoring, and stress examinations. Students will be given the opportunity to enhance their EKG interpretation skills and become familiar with the cardiac catheterization and electrophysiology laboratories. Per student preference, exposure to other cardiac imaging modalities including nuclear cardiology, cardiac MRI, and cardiac CT can be provided. Students will be provided with a schedule of subjects as an outline for reading.
Evaluation:
Each student will be asked to complete a cardiology subject syllabus with the clerkship director. This will consist of 10-15 minutes mini-lectures provided to the student(s) several times per month. Each student will make one PowerPoint presentation on a subject decided upon at the beginning of the rotation.
BPVAH
1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
3
0
44
2,4
Afaq, Mazhar
Clinical
Card
 
 MDE 8224 Consultative Cardiology
At TGH and T-VAH: This elective offers an opportunity to develop skills in the evaluation of patients referred for cardiology consultation at the VA and Tampa General Hospital. The students will participate in the evaluation of patients referred for cardiology consultation and will assist with the integration of the general medical data base with data gathered by both noninvasive (electrocardiography, ambulatory electrocardiography, stress testing) and invasive hemodynamic techniques, where indicated. This course allows the student to interpret a large number of electrocardiograms under the supervision of the attending staff. Staff attending review will provide individual instruction. Attendance at various other weekly Cardiology Department teaching conferences is required.
Evaluation:
The faculty will make performance evaluations from data derived from clinical discussions and didactic presentations by the student.
T-VAH
1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
44
2,4
Leonelli, Fabio
Clinical
Card
 
 MDE 8226 Cardiology Acute Coronary Care
Students taking this course will work with the house officers, cardiology fellow and attending cardiologists in the Acute Coronary Care Units. Emphasis is on the total evaluation of the patient with acute and critical cardiovascular disease. Experience is available in the Non-Invasive Heart Station, Cardiac Catheterization Lab and/or the Electrophysiology Lab by prior arrangement.
Objectives:
  1. Demonstrate the knowledge and skills necessary to obtain a proper cardiac history. The student will pay special attention to and record medications, medication compliance, diet compliance, and risk factors for various cardiac diseases.
  2. Demonstrate proficiency in proper bedside physical examination. 
  3. Be able to accurately assess the presence or absence of congestive heart failure, cardiac tamponade, basic murmurs of valvular heart disease such as mitral regurgitation, mitral stenosis, aortic stenosis, aortic regurgitation and tricuspid regurgitation, and the presence or absence of peripheral vascular disease and abdominal aortic aneurysms.
  4. Demonstrate basic electrocardiographic skills including an understanding of basic arrhythmias such as atrial fibrillation, atrial flutter, supraventricular tachycardia, multi-focal atrial tachycardia, ventricular tachycardia, and a basic diagnosis on the 12 lead ECG such as right and left bundle branch block, left ventricular hypertrophy, acute myocardial infarction, ischemia, WPW, and hyperkalemia.
  5. Infer heart size, presence of cephalization, infiltrate, pleural effusions, and pneumothorax by looking at a chest X-ray.
  6. Identify medical, interventional, and surgical therapies for basic cardiac syndromes such as myocardial infarction, unstable angina, chronic angina, congestive heart failure, valvular heart disease, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and arrhythmia.
  7. Name and utilize a variety of clinical pathways and practice guidelines.
  8. Access and critically evaluate current medical information and scientific evidence.
  9. Use information technology or other available methodologies to access and manage information, support patient care decisions and enhance both patient and physician education.
  10. Explain the principles of primary, secondary prevention and risk modification.
  11. Summarize the indications and diagnostic yield of various cardiac studies and therapeutics.
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
50
2,4
Jacobs, Larry
Clinical
Derm
 
 MDE 8251 Clinical Dermatology
Upon completion of this elective, the student will be able to conduct a full dermatologic examination and will be able to recognize and offer reasonable management for common dermatologic disorders, including those primary in the integument and those associated with systemic disease. Students will rotate through the offices of Advanced Dermatology Associates, may see inpatient consults at LVHN, and may participate in the LVHN Dermatology Clinic. The student will attend various weekly conferences with the Dermatology residents.
Student progress and performance in the clinical setting will be evaluated by the faculty and residents.

Periods 2, 3 and 4 are reserved for students applying to dermatology residency programs.
LVHN
1-2, 3B-11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Purcell, Stephen
Clinical
Derm
 
 MDE 8251 Clinical Dermatology
Upon completion of this elective, the student will be able to conduct a full dermatologic examination and will be able to recognize and offer reasonable management for common dermatologic disorders, including those primary in the integument and those associated with systemic disease. Students will rotate throughout the elective at the USF Morsani Center, the James A. Haley VA Hospital, Moffitt Cancer Center, and other ancillary clinics. The student will attend various weekly conferences with the Dermatology residents.
Student progress and performance in the clinical setting will be evaluated by the faculty and residents.

Periods 2, 3 and 4 are reserved for students applying to dermatology residency programs.
MCAH
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
4
0
40-44
4
Patel, Nishit
Clinical
Derm
 
 MDE 8536 Elective in Dermatopathology
This course is designed for students interested in expanding their knowledge of dermatopathology. Students will receive didactic and case-based instruction in dermatopathology using daily microscope, sign-out with attending faculty, and attending weekly dermatopathology teaching conferences. Students may have the opportunity to participate in research in the form of co-authoring a case report, meeting abstract, or assisting with a portion of a larger departmental research project with a resident or faculty member, if one is available during the rotation.
USFMS
 8 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40-44
4
Rodriguez-Waitkus, Paul
 
Derm
 
 MDT 8250 Special Topics in Dermatology

Contact:
Kandi Smith
ksmith3@health.usf.edu

This course allows third year students to gain exposure to various topics in Dermatology by special arrangment with the Dermatology department director, Dr. Nishit Patel.

USFMS
 1 - 11
None, Yr 3 only
1
0
40
2
Patel, Nishit
 
Derm
 
MEL 7320L Externship in Dermatology
EXT
 1 - 7
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
44
4
Patel, Nishit
Externship
Derm
 
MEL 9999L Indep Study in Dermatology
USFMS
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
44
4
Patel, Nishit
Indep Study
Emerg Med
 
 MDR 8710 Research in Emergency Medicine
Contact:
Dr. Jason Wilson
tampaerdoc@gmail.com
Any interested student should contact Dr. Wilson to plan the elective. This should be done at least 3 months prior to the start of the elective. Students participating in the elective should be interested in pursuing a career in emergency medicine. 
This course is designed to introduce students to clinical research in the emergency department. Students will first learn the foundations and principles of human subjects research. Students will then engage in direct patient recruitment and enrollment efforts in the ED. Student will work with the investigators, study coordinators and research assistants to consent patients and execute a study protocol. Finally, students will also have exposure to the administrative oversight of the research division through participation in biweekly research meetings, IRB meetings, hospital feasibility meetings as well as site initiation, monitoring, or close-out visits. 
Objectives:
  1. Obtain human subjects research certification and understand the principles and history of human subjects research. During this process, student will obtain CITI certification.
  2. Understand the administrative infrastructure necessary to operationalize emergency medicine/acute care research
  3. Develop the ability to design and evaluate testable scientific hypotheses for clinical research
  4. Participate in monthly Journal Club
  5. Become familiar with study protocols, FDA regulations for clinical research, patient consent process
Evaluation:
The student will be assessed during this rotation in four ways.
  1. 25% participation at assigned meetings and research shifts
  2. 25% observations of student motivation/achievement/abilities during patient and staff interactions
  3. 25% participation and completion of Journal Club assignment (3 articles each with journal club worksheet)
  4. 25% online, open-notes/open-resource quiz on the foundations of EBM
TGH
 1 -11
None
2
0
40
2, 4
Wilson, Jason
 Research
Emerg Med
 
 MDT 8710 Intro to Emergency Medicine
This introduction to Emergency Medicine integrates clinical skills and evidence-based medicine through didactic lectures, observation, performance of clinical procedures, hands-on clinical experiences, and direct interaction with faculty, individual patients, and families. Students will manage the patient using the "team approach," which involves EMTs, nurses, physicians, and students. They are expected to evaluate patients, address their presenting complaints, initiate workups, and provide definitive therapies. There is also interactive simulated skills sessions ranging from suturing, central lines, lumbar puncture, and intubations.
This rotation will enrich students' knowledge, help them develop history-taking ability, physical skill assessment, and diagnostic and management skills, procedural skills, as well as help them develop a caring, compassionate, and empathetic attitude in dealing with patients and their families.
Because of the wide array or patients and pathology, the rotation is an excellent introduction to acute care and primary care medicine regardless of which ever field the student may be considering. It is required pre-requisite for those USF students considering Emergency Medicine as as career.
Evaluation:
The student's grade is primarily based on daily attending evaluations but will incorporate quality case presentations, clinical skills evaluation, required attendance at emergency medicine conferences, and written testing.
TGH
 1 - 9 (Yr 4)
 1 - 12 (Yr 3)
None
5
0
40
2
Zachariah, Anish
 Clinical
Emerg Med
 
 MEL 8347 AI in Emergency Medicine
This acting internship integrates clinical skills and evidence-based medicine through didactic lectures, performance of clinical procedures, hands-on clinical experiences, observation and direct interaction with faculty, individual patients, and families. Students will manage the patient using the "team approach," which involves EMTs, nurses, physicians, and students. Students are expected to evaluate patients, address their presenting complaints, initiate workups, and provide definitive therapies.
This rotation will enrich students' knowledge, help them develop history-taking ability, physical skill assessment, diagnostic and management skills, as well as help them develop a caring, compassionate and empathetic attitude in dealing with patients and their families.
Evaluation:
Students will be graded based on clinical evaluations from their preceptors. Additionally, students will be required to take a series of online open book quizzes.
LVHN
 3 - 8
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40-44
4
Worrilow, Charles
Clinical
Emerg Med
 
 MEL 8347 AI in Emergency Medicine
This acting internship integrates clinical skills and evidence-based medicine through didactic lectures, performance of clinical procedures, hands-on clinical experiences, observation and direct interaction with faculty, individual patients, and families. Students will manage the patient using the "team approach," which involves EMTs, nurses, physicians, and students. Students are expected to evaluate patients, address their presenting complaints, initiate workups, and provide definitive therapies.
This rotation will enrich students' knowledge, help them develop history-taking ability, physical skill assessment, diagnostic and management skills, as well as help them develop a caring, compassionate and empathetic attitude in dealing with patients and their families.
Evaluation:
Student grades are based on daily attending evaluations, quality case presentations, attendance at emergency medicine conferences, participation in a procedural lab, and performance on an end-of-rotation emergency medicine exam.

TGH
 1 - 11
Intro to EM
6
0
40-44
4
Semmons, Rachel
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MDE 8104 Complex Care in the Community
Contact:
Davida Leayman
Allentown, PA 18101
Ph: 484-862-3067
Davida_M.Leayman@lvhn.org

 

The Neighborhood Health Centers of the Lehigh Valley (NHCLV) is  a Federally Qualified Community Health Center serving the under-served community of Allentown. Understanding health in a broad context, we seek to partner with our patients and community to build skills for stronger families and a healthier community.  In June of 2012, NHCLV along with three other sites around the country entered into a  partnership with Dr. Jeff Brenner’s Camden Coalition of Health Care Providers to develop outreach teams and community support based on Dr. Brenner’s innovative work in Camden.  Teams work intensively with “Superutilizers” who have multiple hospitalizations and a tangled story of poverty, isolation and co-morbidity.  NHCLV has partnered with Congregations United for Neighborhood Action (CUNA), Community Exchange Timebank and Parish Nursing Coalition to meet our superutilizers when and where they need us most – in the hospitals, in medical offices, in their homes and communities – to develop the relationships and understanding they need to break the pattern of high cost, low value interaction with fragmented systems of care.    
This elective is designed to introduce senior students to comprehensive, relationship centered care for complex patients in community settings.  At the intersection of community health and primary care, students will work with our Outreach Teams as health coaches and story gatherers to partner with patients and learn from the patient's point of view what it takes to live a good life in the face of complex illness.  Students will  participate in daily team rounds, home visits, accompany patients to specialist and primary care visits, and Students will also have opportunities to work closely with our community engagement including our Timebank service exchange and community organizing. In addition, students will have opportunities to practice in our community health center.
Objectives:
  1. Identify social determinants of health across the lifespan that contribute to complex illness
  2. Walk with patients and describe how healthcare systems designed to help sometimes hurt people
  3. Develop empathy and deeper understanding by creating digital stories with patients about their lives and healthcare experiences
  4. Develop skills in health coaching for self management of complex health issues using motivational interviewing techniques
  5. Describe the roles in interdisciplinary team and progression to transformation for patients engaged in program
  6. Compare and contrast NHCLV Superutilizer program with other programs serving similar populations
  7. Describe the health policy implications of learnings from personal experiences including service delivery redesign, payment reform, and outcomes at local, state and federal levels
  8. Reflect on implications for relationship centered care in student's vision of personal practice
Evaluation:
Students will work in close contact with the interdisciplinary team and participate in daily huddles.  They will meet with the elective director at or before the beginning of the course to set learning goals, and at the midpoint and end of rotation to debrief experiences and offer feedback. Students will provide the course director with weekly reflections.  End of rotation assignments include a three minute digital story created collaborative with a patient and a final presentation to the team and leadership group on the topic of their choice.  Grading for this elective will be S/U (Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory).  Students who complete all assignments and engage respectfully with the team and patients will be assessed as satisfactory by the elective director.
Any interested student must contact Dr Lecher to plan specific goals and activities for the elective.
LVHN
1,3,5,7,9,11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40
4
Lecher, Abby
 Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 7258 Elect in Rural Med or Underserved
Sites:
Premier Community HealthCare Group (Dade City), Suncoast Community Health Care Centers (Ruskin, Dover, Plant City), Community Health Centers of Pinellas (Clearwater, Largo, Pinellas Park, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs), or Citrus County Health Department (Lecanto) 
This elective rotation is designed to introduce the senior student to the unique characteristics of medical practice in a rural or underserved community. Students will be supervised by clinical family physician faculty and will gain a better understanding of providing care to a medically underserved population and the tremendous health needs that exist.
Goals and Objectives:
  1. Compare and contrast the health needs and problems encountered in rural or underserved practice to those encountered in prior urban practice rotations
  2. Identify the unique opportunities and challenges to medical practice and life in a rural or underserved community
  3. Introduce/sensitize the student to cross-cultural issues in health care
  4. Understand the mechanisms and indications for consultation and referral in rural or underserved practice settings
  5. Evaluate the business management of rural or underserved practice, including availability of organized funding for patient care, managed care, etc.
Organization of Elective:
  1. Arrangements for a specific time commitment will be made through the Department of Family Medicine in conjunction with Gulfcoast North AHEC.
  2. The student will accompany the physician during the course of the preceptor’s schedule  (which may involve a Saturday clinic or extended evening hours ) at the designated clinic site, will see patients, and will perform procedures assigned by the preceptor under his/her supervision.
  3. At certain locations opportunities are available for additional practice activities within the hospital, emergency department, and in the community.
Evaluation:
The assigned faculty preceptor will provide an individual evaluation addressing the student's adaptability and understanding as well as knowledge, judgment, and rapport.
Availability:
At certain sites this elective is available to USF students only. The Department of Family Medicine and Gulfcoast North AHEC will make the final arrangements. Availability at all clinic sites is per the preceptor’s approval.
CCHD
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Faculty at CCHD
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 7258 Elect in Rural Med or Underserved
Contact:
Davida Leayman
Allentown, PA 18101
Ph: 484-862-3067
Davida_M.Leayman@lvhn.org

This is a rural/underserved health elective in which a student will be matched with an AHEC preceptor in the Mahoning Valley, Carbon County, Lehigh County, or Northampton County area.  Responsibilities will largely be assisting with out-patient clinical care in a rural primary care office, though students may be expected to participate in hospital rounds/ER call at a hospital local to the primary practice site (depending upon preceptor).  Coordination of the elective and placement is through East-central PA Area Health Education Center (ECPA AHEC), with office located in Lehighton, PA.  This clerkship might include a daily commute of up to 60 minutes from LVHN- Cedar Crest.  Housing within the local community will not be provided.  Students should also note that "rural/underserved" is a relative term.  Many areas within 60 minutes of LVHN-Cedar Crest fit the definition and are typical of rural Pennsylvania.  However, these are not REMOTE rural communities, which have a different flavor and feel.  Students interested in a remote experience should consider other options.    
Goals and Objectives:
  1. Compare and contrast the health needs and problems encountered in rural or underserved practice to those encountered in prior urban practice rotations
  2. Identify the unique opportunities and challenges to medical practice and life in a rural or underserved community
  3. Introduce/sensitize the student to cross-cultural issues in health care
  4. Understand the mechanisms and indications for consultation and referral in rural or underserved practice settings
  5. Evaluate the business management of rural or underserved practice, including availability of organized funding for patient care, managed care, etc.
Organization of Elective:
  1. Arrangements for a specific time commitment will be made through the Department of Family Medicine.
  2. The student will accompany the clinic physician Monday through Friday at the designated clinic site, will see patients, and will perform procedures assigned by the preceptor under his/her supervision.
  3. At certain locations opportunities are available for additional practice activities within the hospital, emergency department, and in the community.
Evaluation:
The assigned faculty preceptor will provide an individual evaluation addressing the student's adaptability and understanding as well as knowledge, judgment, and rapport.
Availability:
Any interested student must inform Dr. Brohm AT LEAST 3 MONTHS PRIOR TO THE START OF THE ELECTIVE to allow time to coordinate with ECPA AHEC in placing them with a rural/underserved physician. Students should consider whether they would prefer a rural or underserved urban practice prior to contacting Dr. Brohm.
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Brohm, Veronica
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 7258 Elect in Rural Med or Underserved
Sites:
Premier Community HealthCare Group (Dade City), Suncoast Community Health Care Centers (Ruskin, Dover, Plant City), Community Health Centers of Pinellas (Clearwater, Largo, Pinellas Park, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs), or Citrus County Health Department (Lecanto)  
This elective rotation is designed to introduce the senior student to the unique characteristics of medical practice in a rural or underserved community. Students will be supervised by clinical family physician faculty and will gain a better understanding of providing care to a medically underserved population and the tremendous health needs that exist.
Goals and Objectives:
  1. Compare and contrast the health needs and problems encountered in rural or underserved practice to those encountered in prior urban practice rotations
  2. Identify the unique opportunities and challenges to medical practice and life in a rural or underserved community
  3. Introduce/sensitize the student to cross-cultural issues in health care
  4. Understand the mechanisms and indications for consultation and referral in rural or underserved practice settings
  5. Evaluate the business management of rural or underserved practice, including availability of organized funding for patient care, managed care, etc.
Organization of Elective:
  1. Arrangements for a specific time commitment will be made through the Department of Family Medicine in conjunction with Gulfcoast North AHEC.
  2. The student will accompany the physician during the course of the preceptor’s schedule  (which may involve a Saturday clinic or extended evening hours ) at the designated clinic site, will see patients, and will perform procedures assigned by the preceptor under his/her supervision.
  3. At certain locations opportunities are available for additional practice activities within the hospital, emergency department, and in the community.
Evaluation:
The assigned faculty preceptor will provide an individual evaluation addressing the student's adaptability and understanding as well as knowledge, judgment, and rapport.
Availability:
At certain sites this elective is available to USF students only. The Department of Family Medicine and Gulfcoast North AHEC will make the final arrangements. Availability at all clinic sites is per the preceptor’s approval.
PCHG
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Faculty at PCHG
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 7258 Elect in Rural Med or Underserved
Sites:
Premier Community HealthCare Group (Dade City), Suncoast Community Health Care Centers (Ruskin, Dover, Plant City), Community Health Centers of Pinellas (Clearwater, Largo, Pinellas Park, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs), or Citrus County Health Department (Lecanto)  
This elective rotation is designed to introduce the senior student to the unique characteristics of medical practice in a rural or underserved community. Students will be supervised by clinical family physician faculty and will gain a better understanding of providing care to a medically underserved population and the tremendous health needs that exist.
Goals and Objectives:
  1. Compare and contrast the health needs and problems encountered in rural or underserved practice to those encountered in prior urban practice rotations
  2. Identify the unique opportunities and challenges to medical practice and life in a rural or underserved community
  3. Introduce/sensitize the student to cross-cultural issues in health care
  4. Understand the mechanisms and indications for consultation and referral in rural or underserved practice settings
  5. Evaluate the business management of rural or underserved practice, including availability of organized funding for patient care, managed care, etc.
Organization of Elective:
  1. Arrangements for a specific time commitment will be made through the Department of Family Medicine in conjunction with Gulfcoast North AHEC.
  2. The student will accompany the physician during the course of the preceptor’s schedule  (which may involve a Saturday clinic or extended evening hours ) at the designated clinic site, will see patients, and will perform procedures assigned by the preceptor under his/her supervision.
  3. At certain locations opportunities are available for additional practice activities within the hospital, emergency department, and in the community.
Evaluation:
The assigned faculty preceptor will provide an individual evaluation addressing the student's adaptability and understanding as well as knowledge, judgment, and rapport.
Availability:
At certain sites this elective is available to USF students only. The Department of Family Medicine and Gulfcoast North AHEC will make the final arrangements. Availability at all clinic sites is per the preceptor’s approval.
DMH
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Faculty at DMH
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 7258 Elect in Rural Med or Underserved
Sites:
Premier Community HealthCare Group (Dade City), Suncoast Community Health Care Centers (Ruskin, Dover, Plant City), Community Health Centers of Pinellas (Clearwater, Largo, Pinellas Park, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs), or Citrus County Health Department (Lecanto)  
This elective rotation is designed to introduce the senior student to the unique characteristics of medical practice in a rural or underserved community. Students will be supervised by clinical family physician faculty and will gain a better understanding of providing care to a medically underserved population and the tremendous health needs that exist.
Goals and Objectives:
  1. Compare and contrast the health needs and problems encountered in rural or underserved practice to those encountered in prior urban practice rotations
  2. Identify the unique opportunities and challenges to medical practice and life in a rural or underserved community
  3. Introduce/sensitize the student to cross-cultural issues in health care
  4. Understand the mechanisms and indications for consultation and referral in rural or underserved practice settings
  5. Evaluate the business management of rural or underserved practice, including availability of organized funding for patient care, managed care, etc.
Organization of Elective:
  1. Arrangements for a specific time commitment will be made through the Department of Family Medicine in conjunction with Gulfcoast North AHEC.
  2. The student will accompany the physician during the course of the preceptor’s schedule  (which may involve a Saturday clinic or extended evening hours ) at the designated clinic site, will see patients, and will perform procedures assigned by the preceptor under his/her supervision.
  3. At certain locations opportunities are available for additional practice activities within the hospital, emergency department, and in the community.
Evaluation:
The assigned faculty preceptor will provide an individual evaluation addressing the student's adaptability and understanding as well as knowledge, judgment, and rapport.
Availability:
At certain sites this elective is available to USF students only. The Department of Family Medicine and Gulfcoast North AHEC will make the final arrangements. Availability at all clinic sites is per the preceptor’s approval.
SCHC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Faculty at SCHC
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 7258 Elect in Rural Med or Underserved
Sites:
Premier Community HealthCare Group (Dade City), Suncoast Community Health Care Centers (Ruskin, Dover, Plant City), Community Health Centers of Pinellas (Clearwater, Largo, Pinellas Park, St. Petersburg, Tarpon Springs), or Citrus County Health Department (Lecanto) 
This elective rotation is designed to introduce the senior student to the unique characteristics of medical practice in a rural or underserved community. Students will be supervised by clinical family physician faculty and will gain a better understanding of providing care to a medically underserved population and the tremendous health needs that exist.
Goals and Objectives:
  1. Compare and contrast the health needs and problems encountered in rural or underserved practice to those encountered in prior urban practice rotations
  2. Identify the unique opportunities and challenges to medical practice and life in a rural or underserved community
  3. Introduce/sensitize the student to cross-cultural issues in health care
  4. Understand the mechanisms and indications for consultation and referral in rural or underserved practice settings
  5. Evaluate the business management of rural or underserved practice, including availability of organized funding for patient care, managed care, etc.
Organization of Elective:
  1. Arrangements for a specific time commitment will be made through the Department of Family Medicine in conjunction with Gulfcoast North AHEC.
  2. The student will accompany the physician during the course of the preceptor’s schedule  (which may involve a Saturday clinic or extended evening hours ) at the designated clinic site, will see patients, and will perform procedures assigned by the preceptor under his/her supervision.
  3. At certain locations opportunities are available for additional practice activities within the hospital, emergency department, and in the community.
Evaluation:
The assigned faculty preceptor will provide an individual evaluation addressing the student's adaptability and understanding as well as knowledge, judgment, and rapport.
Availability:
At certain sites this elective is available to USF students only. The Department of Family Medicine and Gulfcoast North AHEC will make the final arrangements. Availability at all clinic sites is per the preceptor’s approval.
CHCP
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Faculty at CHCP
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 7267 International Health Elective
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
There are a wide variety of opportunities available for students with an interest in international health care. This elective is designed to provide support for USF students to obtain an international medical experience during their fourth year.
Experiences may include:
  • Foreign travel and provision of medical services
  • Academic study abroad (readings and lectures) on the health problems of a particular area
  • Preparation and/or presentation of a report on the student's experience
Objectives:
  1. Identify the general and specific health care needs of a particular foreign country
  2. Identify the role of the primary care physician in international health care
  3. Gain additional clinical skills in the provision of primary health care
Evaluation:
The student’s evaluation will be individualized based on the format of his/her particular elective. The specific evaluation criteria will be decided in consultation with Dr. Gonzalez and/or Dr. Callegari prior to scheduling the elective.
Course Requirements:
Any interested student MUST meet with Dr. Gonzalez and/or Dr. Callegari to plan the elective. Ideally, this should be done prior to the start of the academic year but MUST OCCUR AT LEAST 6 MONTHS PRIOR TO THE START OF THE ELECTIVE. An international travel packet must be completed at least 3 months prior to the start of the rotation and submitted to the USF Medicine International Office. A copy must also be provided to the educational coordinator. Any SELECT student interested in the elective will also need prior approval to coordinate having a faculty advisor at LVHN to help with the advising, planning, and evaluation of this elective.
Emergency medical insurance is required for all electives abroad.

 

EXT
 1 - 9
Yr 4 Status
4
0
45-50
4
Gonzalez, Eduardo
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MDI 8120 Acting Internship Family Med
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
Contact:
Kimberly Newton
Ph: 727-893-6891
Objectives:
  1. Integrate the student into the hospital teaching service such that the student functions at the level of an intern, managing their own patients under the supervision of a senior resident
  2. Strengthen the student’s ability to develop an initial assessment and plan for patients requiring hospitalization, to succinctly present the admission to the team, and to effectively manage the patient’s medical problems throughout the hospital admission
  3. Educate the student regarding common medical problems requiring hospital admission, indications for common in-patient procedures, discharge planning, and legal/ethical/cost considerations
Responsibilities:
The student is expected to function as a Family Medicine intern under the direct supervision of the senior resident and attending. This includes pre-rounding on their patients, writing SOAP notes, attending morning report and teaching rounds, writing orders, following up on labs/consults/imaging, and doing discharge planning. Overnight call is to be determined by the site of the AI.
Evaluation: 
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessments, plans, and presentations
  • Clinical decision-making skills
  • Attitude, motivation, and rapport with patients and team members
Scheduling:
To reserve a space in this course at Bayfront Family Medicine Residency, students must contact Kimberly Newton at (727) 893-6891.

Final arrangements concerning the course location/preceptor will be made by the Department of Family Medicine after the student is scheduled for the elective.
BFMC
 1 - 7, 9 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-50
4
Gonzalez, Eduardo
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MDI 8120 Acting Internship Family Med
Contact:
Davida Leayman
Allentown, PA 18101
Ph: 484-862-3067
Davida_M.Leayman@lvhn.org
Objectives:
  1. Integrate the student into the hospital teaching service such that the student functions at the level of an intern, managing their own patients under the supervision of a senior resident
  2. Strengthen the student’s ability to develop an initial assessment and plan for patients requiring hospitalization, to succinctly present the admission to the team, and to effectively manage the patient’s medical problems throughout the hospital admission
  3. Educate the student regarding common medical problems requiring hospital admission, indications for common in-patient procedures, discharge planning, and legal/ethical/cost considerations
Responsibilities:
The student is expected to function as a Family Medicine intern under the direct supervision of the senior resident and attending. This includes pre-rounding on their patients, writing SOAP notes, attending morning report and teaching rounds, writing orders, following up on labs/consults/imaging, and doing discharge planning. Overnight call is to be determined by the site of the AI.
Evaluation:
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessments, plans, and presentations
  • Clinical decision-making skills
  • Attitude, motivation, and rapport with patients and team members
Scheduling:
Hospital AI
- Any interested student MUST meet with Dr. Brohm to plan the elective.  Ideally, this should be done prior to the start of the academic year, but MUST OCCUR AT LEAST 3 MONTHS PRIOR to the start of the elective. In addition to adult hospital care, the service can include newborn and child care, and nursing home care. Students will follow their own patients on the hospital service participating in treatment plans, aftercare plans and family systems plans.  They will also spend at least one week working on Family Medicine service night float. 
Office-based AI - No prior approval required.  Students will spend each day seeing patients and working closely with the LVHN Family Medicine residency program faculty members and residents. The experience will take place in one of the residency’s continuity care site offices.  Students will see patients, write prescriptions and document their care as if they are a Family Medicine intern.  The skills and values of "Turtle Craft," our relationship-centered approach to family medicine, will be taught.
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40-50
4
Brohm, Veronica
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MDI 8120 Acting Internship Family Med
Contact:
Lee Blomberg
Ph: 727-467-2517
Objectives:
  1. Integrate the student into the hospital teaching service such that the student functions at the level of an intern, managing their own patients under the supervision of a senior resident
  2. Strengthen the student’s ability to develop an initial assessment and plan for patients requiring hospitalization, to succinctly present the admission to the team, and to effectively manage the patient’s medical problems throughout the hospital admission
  3. Educate the student regarding common medical problems requiring hospital admission, indications for common in-patient procedures, discharge planning, and legal/ethical/cost considerations
Responsibilities:
The student is expected to function as a Family Medicine intern under the direct supervision of the senior resident and attending. This includes pre-rounding on their patients, writing SOAP notes, attending morning report and teaching rounds, writing orders, following up on labs/consults/imaging, and doing discharge planning. Overnight call is to be determined by the site of the AI.
Evaluation:
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessments, plans, and presentations
  • Clinical decision-making skills
  • Attitude, motivation, and rapport with patients and team members
Scheduling:
To determine availability of elective space at Morton Plant Family Medicine Residency, contact Lee Blomberg at (727) 467-2517. Housing may be available on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Final arrangements concerning the course location/preceptor will be made by the Department of Family Medicine after the student is scheduled for the elective.
MPMHC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-50
4
Gonzalez, Eduardo
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8254 Elective in Sports Medicine
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
Contact:
Linda Giordano
Ph: 813-974-2445
lgiordan@health.usf.edu
Objective:
This elective will provide students an opportunity to learn sports medicine from a primary care/family medicine and orthopaedic standpoint. Senior students will have the opportunity to work in the sports medicine clinic in the USF Family Medicine and Sports Medicine Clinics. They will also work with orthopedic surgeons in the community who are actively involved in sports medicine and the care of athletes. Students will learn the basics of the examination and assessment of musculoskeletal injuries in athletes as well as non-orthopedic medical problems of the athlete. There will be an opportunity to work with athletic trainers, physical therapists and chiropractors and learn the basics of musculoskeletal radiology. Students will also have the opportunity to participate in game coverage for USF athletic events as well as other professional teams in the Tampa Bay area. Students will also be expected to present a project in the area of sports medicine.
Interested students must contact the Education Coordinator from the Department of Family Medicine at (813) 974-2445 or by E-mail at lgiordan@health.usf.edu prior to enrolling.
Last day to drop/add is end of Period 4.
MCAH
 6
Intro to Sports Med, Derm, and Rheum
2
0
40-50
4
Coris, Eric
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8255 Family Medicine Residency Elect
ONLY MPMHC IS AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS

OFFERED TO YEAR 3 STUDENTS AT MPMHC & BFMC ONLY
 Contact: 
Linda Giordano
Ph: 813-974-2445
lgiordan@health.usf.edu
This elective for senior students may be served at any of the affiliated Family Medicine Residencies (Bayfront Medical Center, St. Petersburg; Florida Hospital, Orlando; Halifax Medical Center, Daytona Beach; Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare, Inc., Tallahassee; St. Vincent's Medical Center, Jacksonville; or Morton Plant Mease Health Care, Clearwater) and may include outpatient, inpatient, and nursing home care, or other activities.
Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to the relationship of Family Medicine to the medical community
  2. Demonstrate the relationship of ambulatory care to hospital care and the effective utilization of other specialty consultations
  3. Improve the student's skills and clinical judgment by a defined and supervised patient care experience
  4. Demonstrate the organizational structure of a family medicine residency including office management, medical records, patient education, and preventive medicine
  5. Demonstrate the various responsibilities and activities of the Family Medicine Resident
Evaluation:
The Family Medicine faculty will prepare a formal evaluation based on the following:
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessment and presentation
  • Clinical judgment as indicated by the rationale of diagnostic and management plans
  • Attitude and rapport with patients and families
  • Subjective elements of interpersonal relationships, motivation, and ability  
Students must check with the Department of Family Medicine before scheduling this elective through the Registrar's Office. Students are then required to contact the residency site for final approval and any arrangements that need to be made. Students should not expect that living accommodations will be provided. Contact information can be obtained through the Family Medicine Education Coordinator at 974-2445 or lgiordan@health.usf.edu.
BFMC
 1 - 7, 9 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40-44
2,4
Faculty at Res Program
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8255 Family Medicine Residency Elect
ONLY MPMHC IS AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS

OFFERED TO YEAR 3 STUDENTS AT MPMHC & BFMC ONLY
 Contact: 
Linda Giordano
Ph: 813-974-2445
lgiordan@health.usf.edu
This elective for senior students may be served at any of the affiliated Family Medicine Residencies (Bayfront Medical Center, St. Petersburg; Florida Hospital, Orlando; Halifax Medical Center, Daytona Beach; Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare, Inc., Tallahassee; St. Vincent's Medical Center, Jacksonville; or Morton Plant Mease Health Care, Clearwater) and may include outpatient, inpatient, and nursing home care, or other activities.
Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to the relationship of Family Medicine to the medical community
  2. Demonstrate the relationship of ambulatory care to hospital care and the effective utilization of other specialty consultations
  3. Improve the student's skills and clinical judgment by a defined and supervised patient care experience
  4. Demonstrate the organizational structure of a family medicine residency including office management, medical records, patient education, and preventive medicine
  5. Demonstrate the various responsibilities and activities of the Family Medicine Resident
Evaluation:
The Family Medicine faculty will prepare a formal evaluation based on the following:
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessment and presentation
  • Clinical judgment as indicated by the rationale of diagnostic and management plans
  • Attitude and rapport with patients and families
  • Subjective elements of interpersonal relationships, motivation, and ability  
Students must check with the Department of Family Medicine before scheduling this elective through the Registrar's Office. Students are then required to contact the residency site for final approval and any arrangements that need to be made. Students should not expect that living accommodations will be provided. Contact information can be obtained through the Family Medicine Education Coordinator at 974-2445 or lgiordan@health.usf.edu.
FH
 1 - 8
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40-44
2,4
Faculty at Res Program
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8255 Family Medicine Residency Elect
ONLY MPMHC IS AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS

OFFERED TO YEAR 3 STUDENTS AT MPMHC & BFMC ONLY
 Contact: 
Linda Giordano
Ph: 813-974-2445
lgiordan@health.usf.edu
This elective for senior students may be served at any of the affiliated Family Medicine Residencies (Bayfront Medical Center, St. Petersburg; Florida Hospital, Orlando; Halifax Medical Center, Daytona Beach; Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare, Inc., Tallahassee; St. Vincent's Medical Center, Jacksonville; or Morton Plant Mease Health Care, Clearwater) and may include outpatient, inpatient, and nursing home care, or other activities.
Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to the relationship of Family Medicine to the medical community
  2. Demonstrate the relationship of ambulatory care to hospital care and the effective utilization of other specialty consultations
  3. Improve the student's skills and clinical judgment by a defined and supervised patient care experience
  4. Demonstrate the organizational structure of a family medicine residency including office management, medical records, patient education, and preventive medicine
  5. Demonstrate the various responsibilities and activities of the Family Medicine Resident
Evaluation:
The Family Medicine faculty will prepare a formal evaluation based on the following:
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessment and presentation
  • Clinical judgment as indicated by the rationale of diagnostic and management plans
  • Attitude and rapport with patients and families
  • Subjective elements of interpersonal relationships, motivation, and ability  
Students must check with the Department of Family Medicine before scheduling this elective through the Registrar's Office. Students are then required to contact the residency site for final approval and any arrangements that need to be made. Students should not expect that living accommodations will be provided. Contact information can be obtained through the Family Medicine Education Coordinator at 974-2445 or lgiordan@health.usf.edu.
HH
 3 - 7
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Faculty at Res Program
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8255 Family Medicine Residency Elect
ONLY MPMHC IS AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS

OFFERED TO YEAR 3 STUDENTS AT MPMHC & BFMC ONLY
 Contact: 
Linda Giordano
Ph: 813-974-2445
lgiordan@health.usf.edu
This elective for senior students may be served at any of the affiliated Family Medicine Residencies (Bayfront Medical Center, St. Petersburg; Florida Hospital, Orlando; Halifax Medical Center, Daytona Beach; Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare, Inc., Tallahassee; St. Vincent's Medical Center, Jacksonville; or Morton Plant Mease Health Care, Clearwater) and may include outpatient, inpatient, and nursing home care, or other activities.
Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to the relationship of Family Medicine to the medical community
  2. Demonstrate the relationship of ambulatory care to hospital care and the effective utilization of other specialty consultations
  3. Improve the student's skills and clinical judgment by a defined and supervised patient care experience
  4. Demonstrate the organizational structure of a family medicine residency including office management, medical records, patient education, and preventive medicine
  5. Demonstrate the various responsibilities and activities of the Family Medicine Resident
Evaluation:
The Family Medicine faculty will prepare a formal evaluation based on the following:
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessment and presentation
  • Clinical judgment as indicated by the rationale of diagnostic and management plans
  • Attitude and rapport with patients and families
  • Subjective elements of interpersonal relationships, motivation, and ability  
Students must check with the Department of Family Medicine before scheduling this elective through the Registrar's Office. Students are then required to contact the residency site for final approval and any arrangements that need to be made. Students should not expect that living accommodations will be provided. Contact information can be obtained through the Family Medicine Education Coordinator at 974-2445 or lgiordan@health.usf.edu.
TMH
 2 - 8
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Faculty at Res Program
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8255 Family Medicine Residency Elect
ONLY MPMHC IS AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS

OFFERED TO YEAR 3 STUDENTS AT MPMHC & BFMC ONLY
 Contact: 
Linda Giordano
Ph: 813-974-2445
lgiordan@health.usf.edu
This elective for senior students may be served at any of the affiliated Family Medicine Residencies (Bayfront Medical Center, St. Petersburg; Florida Hospital, Orlando; Halifax Medical Center, Daytona Beach; Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare, Inc., Tallahassee; St. Vincent's Medical Center, Jacksonville; or Morton Plant Mease Health Care, Clearwater) and may include outpatient, inpatient, and nursing home care, or other activities.
Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to the relationship of Family Medicine to the medical community
  2. Demonstrate the relationship of ambulatory care to hospital care and the effective utilization of other specialty consultations
  3. Improve the student's skills and clinical judgment by a defined and supervised patient care experience
  4. Demonstrate the organizational structure of a family medicine residency including office management, medical records, patient education, and preventive medicine
  5. Demonstrate the various responsibilities and activities of the Family Medicine Resident
Evaluation:
The Family Medicine faculty will prepare a formal evaluation based on the following:
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessment and presentation
  • Clinical judgment as indicated by the rationale of diagnostic and management plans
  • Attitude and rapport with patients and families
  • Subjective elements of interpersonal relationships, motivation, and ability  
Students must check with the Department of Family Medicine before scheduling this elective through the Registrar's Office. Students are then required to contact the residency site for final approval and any arrangements that need to be made. Students should not expect that living accommodations will be provided. Contact information can be obtained through the Family Medicine Education Coordinator at 974-2445 or lgiordan@health.usf.edu.
SVMC
4 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Faculty at Res Program
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8255 Family Medicine Residency Elect
ONLY MPMHC IS AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS

OFFERED TO YEAR 3 STUDENTS AT MPMHC & BFMC ONLY
 Contact: 
Linda Giordano
Ph: 813-974-2445
lgiordan@health.usf.edu
This elective for senior students may be served at any of the affiliated Family Medicine Residencies (Bayfront Medical Center, St. Petersburg; Florida Hospital, Orlando; Halifax Medical Center, Daytona Beach; Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare, Inc., Tallahassee; St. Vincent's Medical Center, Jacksonville; or Morton Plant Mease Health Care, Clearwater) and may include outpatient, inpatient, and nursing home care, or other activities.
Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to the relationship of Family Medicine to the medical community
  2. Demonstrate the relationship of ambulatory care to hospital care and the effective utilization of other specialty consultations
  3. Improve the student's skills and clinical judgment by a defined and supervised patient care experience
  4. Demonstrate the organizational structure of a family medicine residency including office management, medical records, patient education, and preventive medicine
  5. Demonstrate the various responsibilities and activities of the Family Medicine Resident
Evaluation:
The Family Medicine faculty will prepare a formal evaluation based on the following:
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessment and presentation
  • Clinical judgment as indicated by the rationale of diagnostic and management plans
  • Attitude and rapport with patients and families
  • Subjective elements of interpersonal relationships, motivation, and ability  
Students must check with the Department of Family Medicine before scheduling this elective through the Registrar's Office. Students are then required to contact the residency site for final approval and any arrangements that need to be made. Students should not expect that living accommodations will be provided. Contact information can be obtained through the Family Medicine Education Coordinator at 974-2445 or lgiordan@health.usf.edu.
MPMHC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40-44
2,4
Faculty at Res Program
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8255 Family Medicine Residency Elect
Contact:
Davida Leayman
Allentown, PA 18101
Ph: 484-862-3067
Davida_M.Leayman@lvhn.org
During this elective, students will spend each day seeing patients and working closely with the LVHN Family Medicine residency program faculty members and residents. The experience will take place in the office, hospital, and community and will demonstrate the meaning of a "community of healing." The skills and values of "Turtle Craft," the name of our relationship-centered approach to family medicine, will be taught. Come and see innovative education in action.
Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to the relationship of Family Medicine to the medical community
  2. Demonstrate the relationship of ambulatory care to hospital care and the effective utilization of other specialty consultations
  3. Improve the student's skills and clinical judgment by a defined and supervised patient care experience
  4. Demonstrate the organizational structure of a family medicine residency including office management, medical records, patient education, and preventive medicine
  5. Demonstrate the various responsibilities and activities of the Family Medicine Resident
Evaluation:
The Family Medicine faculty will prepare a formal evaluation based on the following:
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessment and presentation
  • Clinical judgment as indicated by the rationale of diagnostic and management plans
  • Attitude and rapport with patients and families
  • Subjective elements of interpersonal relationships, motivation, and ability
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
3
0
40-44
2,4
Brohm, Veronica
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8263 Public Sector Medicine
Objective:
Provide a learning experience for students who have a demonstrated interest in the health care of the under-served and other community health issues
Description/Evaluation:
Students will attend all PSMP clinics and post conferences at Judeo Christian Health Clinic and Brandon Outreach Clinic. When more junior students are present, the elective students will assume peer teaching roles. Students are also encouraged to attend similar free clinic sessions at other community sites pending approval of the course director. Other activities include: participation in the monthly Health Disparities Scholarly Concentration Journal club; and a written report of a topic or project related to public medicine. Students will be encouraged to develop projects worthy of publication or presentation at a scholarly meeting.
USFMS
 3 - 11
None
2
0
44
2,4
Woodard, Laurie
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8264 Fam Med Elect-USF Med Clinics
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
Contact:
Linda Giordano
Ph: 813-974-2445
lgiordan@health.usf.edu

The aim of this elective is to reintroduce students to primary care in a Family Medicine clinic. Students will be assigned to the USF Family Medicine clinic where they will be responsible for evaluating patients under the guidance of a faculty member. Emphasis will be on the patient as a person, and the application of knowledge of the effects of disease, lifestyle, family setting, and personality on the development and management of the patient’s problems. Experience will be gained in the management of the wide range of problems present in family medicine. Students may also be assigned to work at JCHC and BORC in some rotations and precepting first and/or second year students.
Objectives:
  1. Identify and manage problems which present commonly in family medicine, emphasizing the importance of continuing care and follow up
  2. Identify the biological, psychological, and social factors that are relevant in the etiology of patients' problems and integrate these factors in a treatment plan
  3. Improve problem solving skills
  4. Study the role of other health professionals in a patient's care (consultants, social workers, nurse practitioners, physical therapists, etc.) and the relationship between them and the family physician
  5. Improve skills in patient education and communication
Evaluation:
Based on competence, consideration of patients, and practical approach to problems.
Final arrangements concerning course location/preceptor will be made by the Department of Family Medicine after the student receives his/her elective choice. Students are required to meet with Dr. Gonzalez one month prior to the start of the rotation to discuss this elective.
MCAH
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
44
2,4
Gonzalez, Eduardo
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8265 Family Medicine Preceptorship
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
In order to determine availability, students are required to select and receive permission from a community preceptor prior to registering for this elective. Final arrangements concerning course location/preceptor will be made by the Department of Family Medicine after the student receives his/her elective choice.
During this elective students will accompany faculty members who are in private clinical practice. This experience will be primarily in the office but will include involvement in the care of the preceptor's patients in hospitals, nursing homes, and at home. Emphasis will be on the patient as a person and the application of knowledge of the effects of disease, lifestyle, family setting, and personality on the development and management of the patient's problems. Experience will be gained in the management of the wide range of problems that are present in family practice.
Objectives:
  1. Identify and manage problems which present commonly in family practice, emphasizing the importance of continuing care and follow up
  2. Identify the biological, psychological, and social factors that are relevant to the etiology of patients’ problems and integrate these factors in a treatment plan
  3. Improve problem-solving skills
  4. Study the role of other health professionals in the patient's health care (consultants, social workers, nurse practitioners, physical therapists, etc.) and the relationship between them and the family physician
Evaluation:
Evaluation is based on competence, consideration, and practical approach to problems,as well as a written report.
CF
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
44-50
2,4
Community Faculty
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8272 MPMHC Women's Health Elective
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
Contact:
Lee Blomberg
Ph: 727-467-2517
Objectives:
  1. Familiarize the student with the practice of gender-specific medicine, women’s preventive health, and obstetrics and gynecology in a Women’s Center of Excellence
  2. Strengthen the student’s ability to take a thorough obstetric/gynecologic and women’s preventive health history and perform routine preventive gynecologic and perinatal exams
  3. Expose the student to common gynecologic/obstetric procedures such as colposcopy, endometrial biopsy, IUD placement/removal, ultrasound, C-section, fetal scalp electrode placement, etc. 
Responsibilities:
Take an active role in the assessment and management of patients in the hospital and office setting.
Evaluation:
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessments, plans, and presentations
  • Clinical decision-making skills
  • Attitude, motivation, and rapport with patients and team members
Scheduling:
To determine availability of elective space, contact Lee Blomberg at (727) 467-2517. Housing may be available on a first-come, first-serve basis.
MPMHC
 1 - 5, 10 - 11
Pri Care
1
0
50
2
Faculty at MPMHC
Clinical
Family Med
 
 MEL 8273 MPMHC Fam Med Flexible Elect
Contact: 
Lee Blomberg
Ph: 727-467-2517
Objectives:
  1. To encourage the student to design and complete his or her own ideal elective within the realm of Family Medicine. This may include but is not limited to: office procedures, Family Medicine out-patient, FM in-patient acting internship, women’s health, pediatrics, geriatrics, nursing home, research, Ob/Gyn, acute care, etc.
  2. To provide the student with housing when available.
  3. To introduce the student to the breadth of Family Medicine.
  4. Specific objectives to be determined based on elective scheduled
Responsibilities:
The student is expected to design their elective in advance with Family Medicine faculty and to take an active role in the assessment and management of patients. For design assistance please contact Lee Blomberg at (727) 467-2517.
 Evaluation:
  • Fund of medical knowledge
  • Quality of assessments, plans, and presentations
  • Clinical decision-making skills
  • Attitude, motivation, and rapport with patients and team members
Scheduling:
To determine availability of elective space, contact Lee Blomberg at (727) 467-2517. Housing may be available on a first-come, first-served basis.
MPMHC
 1 - 11
None
3
0
40
2,4
Faculty at MPMHC
Clinical
Family Med
 
MEL 7320F Externship in Family Medicine
EXT
 1 - 9
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
44
4
Gonzalez, Eduardo
Externship
Family Med
 
MEL 9999F Indep Study - Family Medicine
USFMS or LVHN
 1 - 11
None
No Limit
0
40
2,4
Faculty
Indep Study
Int Med
Allergy/Immun
 MEL 8315 Clinical Allergy/Immunology
Allergic and immunologic problems affect up to 20% of adults and children in the United States, therefore, students rotating in Allergy and Immunology are exposed to a variety of common problems important to physicians regardless of their specialty interests. Both children and adults are seen in the clinics. The objective of the Allergy/Immunology experience is to familiarize the student with the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of various allergic and immunologic diseases. The student will examine patients with common medical diseases such as allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, chronic rhinitis, acute and chronic sinusitis, various forms of asthma, otitis media with effusion, hyper¬sensitivity pneumonitis, atopic eczema, contact dermatitis, urticaria and/or angioedema, drug allergy, insect hypersensitivity, and food allergy. The student will also examine patients with immuno¬deficiency diseases (including HIV infection), eosinophilia, eosinophilic syndromes, and various other immunologic problems.
The student will primarily be involved in out-patient care at the VA Hospital, Tampa General Hospital, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, All Children's Hospital, USF Adult and Pediatric Allergy/Immunology and Immunodeficiency Clinics and will attend four weekly conferences on clinical allergy and immunology given by residents, fellows and faculty from USF College of Medicine.
Evaluation:
Evaluations will be completed by the faculty members who assess the level of clinical competence attained.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
40-44
2,4
Lockey, Richard
Clinical
Int Med
Allergy/Immun
 MEL 8315 Clinical Allergy/Immunology
Allergic and immunologic problems affect up to 20% of adults and children in the United States, therefore, students rotating in Allergy and Immunology are exposed to a variety of common problems important to physicians regardless of their specialty interests. Both children and adults are seen in the clinics. The objective of the Allergy/Immunology experience is to familiarize the student with the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of various allergic and immunologic diseases. The student will examine patients with common medical diseases such as allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, chronic rhinitis, acute and chronic sinusitis, various forms of asthma, otitis media with effusion, hyper¬sensitivity pneumonitis, atopic eczema, contact dermatitis, urticaria and/or angioedema, drug allergy, insect hypersensitivity, and food allergy. The student will also examine patients with immuno¬deficiency diseases (including HIV infection), eosinophilia, eosinophilic syndromes, and various other immunologic problems.
The student will primarily be involved in out-patient care in private doctor's offices.
Evaluation:
Evaluations will be completed by the faculty members who assess the level of clinical competence attained.
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Israel, Howard
Clinical
Int Med
Allergy/Immun
 MEL 8376 Respiratory Disease Research
Allergic and immunologic problems affect up to 20% of adults and children in the United States. Therefore students rotating in Allergy and Immunology are exposed to a variety of common problems important to physicians regardless of their specialty interests. Both children and adults are cared for in the Division of Allergy and Immunology.
Objectives:
The objectives of the respiratory disease research experience at the Joy McCann Culverhouse Airway Disease Center are to familiarize the student with some of the contemporary research methods relating to pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of various allergic and immunologic diseases. The student will participate in hands-on research as it relates to respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory diseases and the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis and asthma. Many other projects by the faculty are underway and the students can participate in research projects in which they have an interest. The student will also have the opportunity to participate in the asthma, allergy and immunology clinical research unit, where up to 30 clinical research projects are ongoing at any one time. Diseases targeted for research include asthma, COPD, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis, chronic rhinitis, acute and chronic sinusitis, nasal polyposis, atopic eczema, urticaria and or angioedema, food allergy, hereditary angioedema and others. The student will learn the accepted methods used in clinical research in this state-of-the-art program.
The student will attend four weekly conferences on basic immunology and clinical allergy and immunology given by residents, fellows and faculty from USF College of Medicine. The student will present a synopsis of his/her work in the last week of his training.
Evaluation:
The faculty members and staff associated with the training program will assess the level of competence and will complete evaluations.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
44
4
Kolliputi, Narasaiah
Research
Int Med
Cardiovascular
 MDT 8200B Sudden Cardiac Death
The course will have 3 components:
  1. Didactics
    1. Basic Science Lectures
    2. Clinical Lectures
    3. Journal Clubs
    4. Teaching Conferences
  2. Clinical Activity
    1. USF Cardiology Clinic
  3. Research/Presentations
Goals and Objectives:
This course is designed is designed to demonstrate and enforce the interaction between clinical and foundational science, reinforcing skills of literature review and mechanistic thinking. Specifically, this course will introduce and review clinical cardiac disorders that have a predominantly genetic etiological component. The course will review diagnosis and management of genetically inherited channelopathies and cardiomyopathies, particularly those which increase the risk of sudden cardiac death, and address the relationship between basic electrophysiological principles on a molecular and cellular level to their clinical manifestations.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated based on interaction with the faculty, a research project, and oral or written presentations.
USFMS
 10A
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
40
2
Chae, Sanders
Basic Science   
Int Med
Cardiovascular
 MEL 8351 Harvey Elective in Cardiology
The major objective of this elective will be to teach the student to perform comprehensive cardiac assessment, emphasizing the physical examination. The course will utilize Harvey (the teaching manikin) and actual patients. This elective will be primarily a self-study course (utilizing Harvey) with a weekly lecture from a cardiologist to review the materials and a weekly quiz to assess the student’s progress in their self-study program. Time will also be devoted to acquiring fundamentals of ECG interpretation and exposure to utilization of exercise testing, echocardiography and cardiac catheterization. Attendance at cardiology teaching conferences is optional.
Course objectives will be assessed by the documentation of individual’s practice on the manikin as well as the three quizzes and a comprehensive written and practical examination at its conclusion.
USFMS
3,5,6,9,10
Yr 4 Status
15
0
44
4
Schocken, Dawn
Basic Science
Int Med
Digest/Nutrition
 MDT 8200C Adv Concepts-Gastroenterology
This course is designed to give students an appreciation for the relationship between basic science and clinical gastroenterology. It will focus on four major areas: inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, viral hepatitis, and gastroesophageal reflux. The basic science basis for diagnosis and therapy will be given in a series of lectures by faculty. Students will then have the opportunity to see patients with these disorders in the Gastroenterology Clinics, the Swallowing Center, and the Endoscopy Center at the Morsani Center for Advanced Health Care. Students will participate in GI Journal Club, Basic Science Conference, Research Conference, Clinical Conferences, and gastroenterology seminars. Students will be given the option of participation in a research project if they desire to do so.
Goals and Objectives:
This course will address the relationship of innate and acquired immunity to the disordered immune response in inflammatory bowel disease, the brain/gut interaction in irritable syndrome, the viral genome and the immune system in viral hepatitis, and the pathophysiology of gastroesophageal reflux and Barrett's esophagus.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated based on direct faculty observation and feedback from patients and families during patient interactions, participation in conferences and seminars, questions by the faculty to determine base knowledge, and the ability to formulate differential diagnoses and propose solutions.
USFMS
 10A
Yr 4 Status
6
0
40
2
Brady, Patrick
Basic Science   
Int Med
Digest/Nutrition
 MEL 8306 Gastroenterology Elective
Upon successful completion of this elective, the student may expect to achieve an acceptable level of competence in the management of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and liver. This will be achieved by the interpretation of symptoms and physical findings, utilization of appropriate laboratory and other diagnostic studies, knowledge of the basic therapeutic approaches, and interpretation of the gastrointestinal radiographs and other imaging techniques. There will be a combination of direct patient contact and personal instruction. Observation of a variety of procedures including diagnostic and therapeutic upper GI panendoscopy, capsule endoscopy, (colonoscopy, polypectomy, diagnostic and therapeutic ERCP, flexible sigmoidoscopy, esophageal dilation and manometry studies will be afforded. Hands-on experience in capsule endoscopy is available. Attendance at ward and teaching rounds, outpatient clinics and teaching conferences will provide a further source of learning. Emphasis will be placed on pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy. Emphasis will also be placed on the techniques of clinical nutrition. Students can participate in a short research project during the rotation or may elect to begin participation in a long term research project. Students will participate in a regularly scheduled conferences and clinics.
Evaluation:
The faculty will base their performance evaluations upon clinical discussions and didactic presentations by the student.
LVH-CC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
44
2,4
Blanco, Paola
Clinical
Int Med
Digest/Nutrition
 MEL 8306 Gastroenterology Elective
Upon successful completion of this elective, the student may expect to achieve an acceptable level of competence in the management of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and liver. This will be achieved by the interpretation of symptoms and physical findings, utilization of appropriate laboratory and other diagnostic studies, knowledge of the basic therapeutic approaches, and interpretation of the gastrointestinal radiographs and other imaging techniques. There will be a combination of direct patient contact and personal instruction. Observation of a variety of procedures including diagnostic and therapeutic upper GI panendoscopy, capsule endoscopy, (colonoscopy, polypectomy, diagnostic and therapeutic ERCP, flexible sigmoidoscopy, esophageal dilation and manometry studies will be afforded. Hands-on experience in capsule endoscopy is available. Attendance at ward and teaching rounds, outpatient clinics and teaching conferences will provide a further source of learning. Emphasis will be placed on pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy. Emphasis will also be placed on the techniques of clinical nutrition. Students can participate in a short research project during the rotation or may elect to begin participation in a long term research project. Students will participate in a regularly scheduled conferences and clinics.
Evaluation:
The faculty will base their performance evaluations upon clinical discussions and didactic presentations by the student.
MCAH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
44
2,4
Brady, Patrick
Clinical
Int Med
Digest/Nutrition
 MEL 8306 Gastroenterology Elective
Upon successful completion of this elective, the student may expect to achieve an acceptable level of competence in the management of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and liver. This will be achieved by the interpretation of symptoms and physical findings, utilization of appropriate laboratory and other diagnostic studies, knowledge of the basic therapeutic approaches, and interpretation of the gastrointestinal radiographs and other imaging techniques. There will be a combination of direct patient contact and personal instruction. Observation of a variety of procedures including diagnostic and therapeutic upper GI panendoscopy, capsule endoscopy, (colonoscopy, polypectomy, diagnostic and therapeutic ERCP, flexible sigmoidoscopy, esophageal dilation and manometry studies will be afforded. Hands-on experience in capsule endoscopy is available. Attendance at ward and teaching rounds, outpatient clinics and teaching conferences will provide a further source of learning. Emphasis will be placed on pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy. Emphasis will also be placed on the techniques of clinical nutrition. Students can participate in a short research project during the rotation or may elect to begin participation in a long term research project. Students will participate in a regularly scheduled conferences and clinics.
Evaluation:
The faculty will base their performance evaluations upon clinical discussions and didactic presentations by the student.
TGH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
44
2,4
Brady, Patrick
Clinical
Int Med
Digest/Nutrition
 MEL 8306 Gastroenterology Elective
Upon successful completion of this elective, the student may expect to achieve an acceptable level of competence in the management of disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and liver. This will be achieved by the interpretation of symptoms and physical findings, utilization of appropriate laboratory and other diagnostic studies, knowledge of the basic therapeutic approaches, and interpretation of the gastrointestinal radiographs and other imaging techniques. There will be a combination of direct patient contact and personal instruction. Observation of a variety of procedures including diagnostic and therapeutic upper GI panendoscopy, capsule endoscopy, (colonoscopy, polypectomy, diagnostic and therapeutic ERCP, flexible sigmoidoscopy, esophageal dilation and manometry studies will be afforded. Hands-on experience in capsule endoscopy is available. Attendance at ward and teaching rounds, outpatient clinics and teaching conferences will provide a further source of learning. Emphasis will be placed on pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis and therapy. Emphasis will also be placed on the techniques of clinical nutrition. Students can participate in a short research project during the rotation or may elect to begin participation in a long term research project. Students will participate in a regularly scheduled conferences and clinics.
Evaluation:
The faculty will base their performance evaluations upon clinical discussions and didactic presentations by the student.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
1
0
44
2,4
Brady, Patrick
Clinical
Int Med
Emerg Med
 MEL 8368 Emerg Med Outside the Hospital
The purpose of this elective is to give the student a broad exposure to the scope of pre-hospital emergency medical services.
Objectives:
  1. Gain an understanding of pre-hospital patient care by rotation with the Tampa Fire Rescue Department and Aeromed at Tampa General Hospital
  2. Learn to manage common toxicological problems by rotation in the Florida Poison Control Center at Tampa General Hospital
  3. Be exposed to EMS Administration by accompanying the medical director of Tampa Fire and Aeromed during administrative duties
  4. Gain an understanding of resource allocation and pre-arrival instruction initiatives by rotation at Signal One Fire and Rescue Dispatch
Time spent in these various areas will depend on the interests and experience of the student participating. A maximum of two students will be accommodated in each rotational block.
TGH
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
44
4
Carrubba, Catherine
Clinical
Int Med
Emerg Med
MEL 7320Q Extern-Emergency Medicine
EXT
 1 - 7
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
44
4
Faculty
Externship
Int Med
Emerg Med
MEL 9999Q Indep Study in Emergency Med
USFMS or LVHN
 1 - 11
Intro to EM, Adult Med, Pri Care
No Limit
0
44
2,4
Faculty
Indep Study
Int Med
Endocrin
 MEL 8305 Clinical Endo & Metabolism
Upon the completion of this elective, the student should understand how to manage patients who have a variety of endocrinologic and metabolic diseases. Students will see in-house consultations at the VA, Tampa General, and H. Lee Moffitt hospitals; attend daily work rounds; endocrine teaching rounds; weekly endocrine conferences; and outpatient endocrine metabolic clinics at the VA Hospital, Tampa General Hospital, and USF Medical Clinics. The student will directly participate in the performance of detailed endocrine tests to better understand their application and interpretation. The student will participate in seminar discussions of clinically important subjects. Informal meetings between students and senior staff members will be conducted on a regular basis to assure that the student fully understands the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of endocrine metabolic disorders (pituitary, thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal, gonadal, diabetic, etc).
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
1
0
40-44
4
Gomez-Daspet, Joaquin
Clinical
Int Med
Endocrin
 MEL 8305 Clinical Endo & Metabolism
The rotation on the Endocrinology services involves exposure to inpatient consultations and the outpatient clinic with a senior resident and the attending endocrinology staff. The main emphasis is on clinical teaching of the pathophysiology of endocrine disorders including appropriate diagnostic tests and modes of therapy.
 This course will prepare students to use acquired knowledge gained in the rotation to evaluate and treat common endocrine disorders via evidenced based medicine. The student will learn how to interact with patients & their families, colleagues, and staff regarding patient care and treatment.
Objectives:
  1.  Evaluate an endocrine patient with history and physical, formulate an appropriate laboratory and radiologic work up, and create a suitable treatment plan.
  2. Demonstrate the ability to manage diabetes mellitus type 1 and 2.
  3. Demonstrate the ability to manage oral and insulin diabetes treatments as well as prevent and manage diabetic complications.
  4. Discuss, evaluate and treat routine endocrine conditions including thyroid, parathyroid, adrenal, pituitary, and gonadal disorders. 
LVH-CC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-44
2,4
Perilli, Gretchen
Clinical
Int Med
Ethics/Palliative
 MDE 8150 Intro to Palliative Med and Hospice
This elective is designed to introduce the basic philosophy of palliative care and how these principles are applied to patients with advanced complex diseases. A three-week OACIS inpatient rotation will consist of full participation on the inpatient consulting service, including daily rounds, weekly interdisciplinary team meetings (IDT), weekly staff meeting, and participation in regular interdisciplinary education sessions and case presentations. Students will assist with inpatient consultations with precepting and support from the full inpatient team as well as a designated supervising physician. Focus will be on assessment and treatment of pain and non-pain symptoms, fundamental skill development in patient and relationship centered care, and coordination of care including family meetings, goals of care discussions, conflict resolution, and withdrawal of life sustaining therapies. The fourth week will be focused on understanding the process of offering palliative care in the home setting and under the hospice medical benefit in the inpatient hospice unit (IPU). Students will participate in home visits with OACIS Nurse Practitioners, and also be in the IPU under the supervision of the hospice medical director, with guidance from the RN case manager, and other members of the hospice team.  For home-based OACIS services, focus will be on assessment and treatment of pain and non-pain symptoms, fundamental skill development in patient and relationship centered care, and coordination of care with goals of care discussions.  For the IPU, focus will be on recognition of the dying process, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacological effects of medication commonly used to treat symptoms in dying patients, and an introduction to the regulatory requirements for hospice.

Objectives:
  1. Initiate palliative care consults on patients in the hospital to include a comprehensive medical history, physical examination and assessment of patient and family understanding of illness and prognosis. Gather a psychosocial, coping history, and spiritual and values history.
  2. Provide a comprehensive assessment of patients with pain identifying physical, psychosocial and spiritual components of distress.
  3. Explain the relevant basic science, pathophysiology, associated symptoms and signs, and diagnostic options useful in differentiating among different etiologies of pain and non-pain syndromes.
  4. In patient encounters, identify and address common patient, family, health care provider, and health care system barriers to effective symptom treatment.
  5. List indications, clinical pharmacology, alternate routes, equianalgesic conversions, appropriate titration, toxicities, and management of common side effects in opioid administration.
  6. Initiate informed relationship-centered dialogues about care.
  7. Demonstrate empathy.
  8. Communicate effectively with patients and families across a broad range of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds.
  9. Communicate effectively with physicians, other health professionals, and health related agencies.
  10. Define patient requirements to qualify for the hospice medical benefit and describe how these benefits are delivered in through an interdisciplinary team.

Evaluation:

For the inpatient educational experience, the trainee will see patients at Lehigh Valley Hospital-Cedar Crest and on the consultation services of the OACIS/Palliative Care Consult Service. They will actively participate in daily team rounds and weekly Inter-Disciplinary Rounds (IDT). Trainees will be assigned patients by the supervising faculty and will be integrally involved in the assessment of the patient's medical history, physical exam, and evaluation of patient and family understanding of illness and prognosis. They will actively participate in family meetings regarding goals of care and treatment plans. In addition, students will complete daily journal entries using a standardized question template to process their emotional/spiritual reaction to the work that is being done. Communication skills will be taught through didactic sessions, role play scenarios, and direct observations.
 For the hospice experience, the student will see patients primarily at the inpatient hospice unit at 17th and Chew St. Additionally, if desired, trainees will see patients who are enrolled in LVH Hospice Services at home with a member of the hospice team including pastoral care, social worker, nurse case manager, and medical director. They will participate in either one inpatient or home-based IDT during the week.
During the entire month, students will attend palliative care journal club, and weekly hospice and palliative medicine fellow education sessions. Additionally, students will be required to read the UNIPAC series, landmark journal articles regarding key palliative care topics, and also to complete relevant CAPC modules.
Knowledge will be assessed through a pre-post knowledge survey and exam, in addition to an oral presentation given at one of the IDT rounds on a palliative care topic of interest. Finally, an overall evaluation will be completed by each member of the IDT using a competency-based assessment tool.

 

LVH-CC
 1,4,5,6,9,10
None
1
0
44
4
Chyu, Michael
Clinical
Int Med
Ethics/Palliative
 MDE 8150 Intro to Palliative Med and Hospice
Contact:
Dr. Howard Tuch
htuch@health.usf.edu
Lourdes Rodriguez
lrodrig1@health.usf.edu

This elective is designed to introduce the basic principles and practice of palliative care. A 2-4 week inpatient rotation will consist of full participation on the inpatient consulting service, including daily rounds, interdisciplinary team meetings (IDT) and participation in regular education sessions and case presentations. Students will assist with inpatient consultations with precepting and supervision from the full inpatient team as well as supervising physicians. Focus will be on the assessment and treatment of pain and non-pain symptoms, coordination of care including family meetings, goals of care discussions, conflict resolution, and withdraw of life sustaining therapies.  Focus will be on the recognition of the dying process, the pharmacokinetics and pharmacological effects of medication commonly used to treat symptoms in dying patients. 
Objectives:
  1. Initiate palliative care consults on patients in the hospital to include a comprehensive medical history, physical examination and assessment of patient and family understanding of illness and prognosis. Gather a psychosocial, spiritual and values history.
  2. Provide a comprehensive assessment of patients with pain identifying physical, psychosocial and spiritual components of distress.
  3. Explain the relevant basic science, pathophysiology, associated symptoms and signs, and diagnostic options useful in differentiating among different etiologies of pain and non-pain syndromes.
  4. In patient encounters, identify and address common patient, family, health care provider and health care system barriers to effective end of life care, hospice and palliative care.
  5. List indications, clinical pharmacology, alternate routes, equi-analgesic conversions, appropriate titration, toxicities, and management of common side effects in opioid administration.
  6. Communicate effectively with patients and families across a broad range of socioeconomic and cultural backgrounds.
  7. Communicate effectively with physicians, other health professionals, and health related agencies.
  8. Define patient requirements to qualify for the hospice medical benefit and other community-based options for patients with serious illnesses
Evaluation:
The student will see patients at Tampa General Hospital on the Palliative Care Consult Service.  The student will actively participate in daily team rounds and scheduled didactic sessions.  Trainees will be assigned patients by the supervising faculty and will be integrally involved in the assessment of the patient's medical history, physical exam, and evaluation of patient and family understanding of illness and prognosis.  They will actively participate in family meetings regarding goals of care and treatment plans.  Evaluation of student will be based on performance of above responsibilities.
TGH
 1-6, 9-11
None
1
0
44
4
Walker, Robert
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MDE 8037 Occupational Medicine Elective
This elective is designed to introduce senior students to Occupational Medicine specialty care and services.  This will encompass common work injury assessment and care, specialized physical exams (i.e., Commercial Driver, Surveillance, Pre-Placement Work Exams, etc.), medical services mandated through OSHA and other regulatory agencies, population health considerations for work groups, preventive medicine concepts, environmental health issues, toxic exposures at work, and assessing individuals for capability to perform work tasks.
The following are experiences which may be included during the rotation:
  • Personal one on one time with multiple practitioners providing occupational medicine and preventive medicine services.  This includes clinic activities at any of LVHN “HealthWork’s” four clinics, LVHN Employee Health Office and “On-Site” locations (i.e., large skilled nursing facility employee health, etc.). Company “Safety and Health Walk-throughs” at various warehouses and manufacturers.  This would involve attendance with another experienced clinician with the goal of recognizing safety and health risks, reporting results to the corporate client and assisting with remedial plans.
  • Meet with Employee Assistance Program (EAP) professionals and learn about E.A.P. services, Audiologist (discuss hearing conservation and interpretation of audiogram reports), certified sleep lab facility, Industrial Hygienist.
  • Observe/Work at the local health department with the Medical Director (for General Preventive Medicine activities).
  • Observe and/or learn about Aviation Exams and the special considerations of the aerospace environment.
  • Learn and perform travel exams (utilize the Travax system).  This involves consideration of medical risks, vaccinations, medication prophylaxis, etc.
  • Learn firefighter health concerns:  perform firefighter exams while recognizing and utilizing NFPA 1582 standards.
  • Projects, as assigned, to utilize data for short research topics.
  • Attendance at quarterly “Safety Peer Group” meeting if present when scheduled (a topic expert presents on a pertinent safety and health issue –  attended by corporate and governmental agency representatives with local OSHA participation)
  • Respiratory Protection Program (29CFR1910.134) familiarization with performance of exams and mandated questionnaire review.
  • Commercial Driver exams with familiarization with regulatory requirements and other considerations
Objectives:
  1. Identify, describe evaluation and treatment of the top ten Occupational Medicine Injuries or Illnesses
  2. Identify several strategies to protect workers at their job location.  This includes procedures to eliminate or reduce hazrdous exposures (Biological, Chemical and Physical)
  3. Describe the role of OSHA, NIOSH, ANSI, EPA, ASHRAE, ACGIH, FMCSA, ASSE, CDC, State DOH, Dept. of Environmental Protection (State), The Joint Commission, and other agencies and associations concerning safety and health.
  4. Learn and demonstrate how to write workplace task limitations and accommodations.
  5. Describe and understand the role of Pre-Placement Employment exams and mandated Surveillance Exams.
  6. Describe: the role of E.A.P. programs, Medical Review Officer physician activities, Respiratory Protection Programs and Hearing Conservation Programs.
  7. Describe the requirements for a physician to become certified to provide commercial driver examinations under the Department of Transportation and the process to complete these examinations.
  8. Describe possible elements of an employee wellness program.
  9. Understand and describe issues involving vaccination to prevent illness and transmission of disease in different work settings.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated on a scale from "unacceptable" to "outstanding" in multiple categories by direct interaction with a preceptor.  They will be provided performance feedback within 5 days of start of the elective and a final assessment at completion of the elective (in writing).  This will include assessment on achievement of objectives listed as well as other general student performance skills observed.
LVH-CC
 5-7, 10 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40
2
Pellosie, Carmine
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MDE 8037 Occupational Medicine Elective
Students should report to the James A. Haley Occupational Health Clinic at 8:00 am on the first day of the elective, as the preceptor, Dr. Williams will be expecting you. Walk over the crosswalk from USF. The clinic is located in T-72 which is on the right across the parking area before you get to the main entrance. The phone number to the clinic and Dr. Rachel Williams is (813) 972-2000 ext. 7628.
The goals of this rotation are for the student to be exposed to the workplace, work exposures, and relevant statutes, such as workers’ compensation. The goal is to return the injured worker back to work while maximizing the patient’s functional recovery. In addition, the student will learn to identify workplace and environmental hazards to reduce the risk of future injury or illness to the patient.
Objectives:
  1. Gain exposure to complete patient histories, with an emphasis on occupation and exposure
  2. Gain exposure to the selection of appropriate diagnostic studies in relation to the occupational injury or exposure
  3. Review relevant occupational IT, databases, guidelines or other resources when providing a summary to the clinical preceptor
  4. Gain exposure to legal and regulatory authority relating to protection and promotion of the public’s health
  5. Assess individual risk for occupational/environmental disorders using an occupational history

Evaluation:
The student will see patients at the James A. Haley Occupational Health Clinic. The  teaching methods used include patient based care, didactic instruction by the preceptor, coordinators or staff, self-directed study and topic assignment. The methods used for evaluation include, 360 evaluations (nursing/clinic/administrative staff)  and preceptor evaluations with an emphasis on the goals of the rotation. Students will be exposed to medical surveillance programs, blood borne pathogen exposure and protocol, patient safety, infection control and be expected to attend the morbidity and mortality meetings and meeting associated with each of the programs listed above.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
None
1
0
40
2,4
Williams, Rachel
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MDE 8038 Telehealth Innovation and Quality Improvement
Contact:
Dr. Alfredo Peguero-Rivera
Alfredo.Peguero-Rivera@va.gov
Dr. Jamie Morano
Jamie.Morano@va.gov
This elective will introduce medical students to the practice and theory of the brave new world of Clinical Video Telehealth (CVT).  The Veterans Administration has been a national leader in CVT to improve access in healthcare for veterans living in rural, remote, and underserved areas. Under the supervision of jointly affilliated VA-USF clinical faculty, students will experience CVT clinics and will develop hands-on telemedicine technical expertise in the fields of infectious diseases (Hepatitis C and HIV) and nephrology. Research methods in quality improvement in healthcare also will be emphasized by use of case examples, journal article review, and actively demonstrating the importance of integrating quality of care with CVT innovation.
TeleID Sessions: Monday 1230-1630; Tuesday 1230-1630
Telenephrology Sessions: Monday 0800-1200; Tuesday 1300-1630; Weds 0830-1100; Thursday 0830-11:00; TeleAnemia Session: Friday 1300-1600
(TeleDerm and TeleWound clinics upon availability and participant interest.)
Please note, medical students will be expected to report to the VA Monday through Friday 0800 to 1630 and to rotate through all sessions above, which will be jointly evaluated by nephrology and ID faculty. Participating select nephrology or infectious disease fellows may choose either the nephrology or infectious disease track and will have more flexibility in their hours and research opportunities due fellowship demands. Telehealth opportunities within Teledermatology or Telewound care may also exist for very motivated participants with advanced notice.
During the course of the clinical rotations, participants will be encouraged to pursue the following:
1)    Required Reading:
Goldmans's Cecil Textbook of Medicine (24th ed):
i.    Vol 1 (XI: Renal and Genitourinary Diseases), Chapters 116-133.
ii.    Vol 2 (XXIV: HIV and the Acquired Immunity Syndrome), Chapters 392-402.
IDSA/AASLD Hepatitis C Treatment Guidelines (http://www.aasld.org/publications/practice-guidelines-0)
HIV Primary Care Primer (to be provided)
2)    Required Online VA TMS Courses:
Clinical Video Telehealth (CVT) Foundations for Teleproviders (#14170)
CVT: Core Competencies (#23393)
3)    Suggested Journals: Health Affairs, Journal of Telemedicine and Telecare; Sign up for Athens access at VA Medical Library (2nd floor) for full access
Objectives:
  1. Compare and contrast clinical video telehealth (CVT) versus the traditional medical clinic in terms of the role of team nursing case managers, health care access, travel logistics, and continuity of care
  2. Be familiar with the use and interpretation of unique technical capabilities within CVT, including use of e-stethoscopes, e-otoscopes, and e-ultrasound
  3. Understand the CVT protocols for Hepatitis C and HIV; be able to list the specific screening and treatment steps for patients entering Hepatitis C care, with or without HIV co-infection
  4. Understand the foundations of a nephrology continuity visit including relevant clinical scenarios such as diabetic and hypertensive nephropathy and metabolic acid-base disorders
  5. Be able to articulate quality improvement needs and outcomes relevant to CVT; participate in a quality improvement presentation (students/residents)
Evaluation:
  1. Oral feedback will be provided at the mid-point, and both oral and written evaluation will be reviewed with the participant at end of the elective period. (For example, 2-week participants will be evaluated at week 1 and 2; 4- week participants will be evaluated at week 2 and 4.)
  2. Evaluation components will consist of dual evaluation by nephrology and ID faculty as applicable for clinical performance (timeliness, interest, punctuality, % sessions attended) , clinical knowledge and competency (HIV, HCV, nephrology), post-test scoring, as well as end project (QI journal article presentation or project).
  3. The post-test will consist of a computerized exam and evaluation covering straightforward concepts on the very basics of Nephrology/Hepatitis C telemedicine as well as the basics of quality improvement concepts.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40
2,4
Peguero-Rivera, Alfredo
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MDE 8140 Geriatric Medicine
The geriatric rotation will offer experience to observe and manage elderly patients with a wide variety of medical conditions on an inpatient and outpatient basis. Students function as members of a team with a resident and attending physicians, offering care for patients in acute, ambulatory, community and long-term care settings, in order to understand the interaction of natural aging and disease as well as the techniques of assessment, therapy and chronic and acute disease management.
Objectives:
  1. Understand the normal anatomical and physiologic changes associated with aging and the concepts of homeostenosis and frailty.
  2. Recognize the atypical presentations of illness in the geriatric patient
  3. Evaluate and manage the common geriatric conditions including:  delirium, dementia, depression, gait disorder and falls, syncope, unintentional weight loss, pain syndromes, urinary incontinence, and constipation
  4. Assess for and prevent the hazards of hospitalization of the geriatric patient including:  'polypharmacy', delirium,deconditioning and functional decline, malnutrition and pain syndromes
  5. Recognize the prevalence of complex and chronic disease in the elderly and its impact on functionality and quality of life
  6. Understand and utilize the AGS Beer’s Criteria for potentially inappropriate medication use in the older adult
  7. Administer and interpret the various standardized instruments used for assessment of cognitive function, psychological affect and physical function in the geriatric population
  8. Understand the various post-acute rehabilitation and long-term care settings, including the duties of the interdisciplinary team members and Medicare/Medicaid and other insurance payment options
Students will see patients on the hospital geriatric consultation service, the ambulatory primary care and out patient consultation service and in several post-acute care rehabilitation and long-term care settings under the direct observation of the geriatric attendings with focus on addressing all the above listed objectives. They will participate in monthly geriatric journal club and geriatric trauma meetings. Students will be given hard copy reading booklets they are expected to review, and will be expected to informally present a geriatric journal article at the end of the rotation. Students will choose one acute hospital patient from the consultation service for continuty follow through to the post-acute rehabilitation setting and provide a written summary about the experience including:  a summary of the patients course in hospital through rehabilitation,  interviews and examinations done with the patient, transitions of care concerns, care plan formulations for post-rehab and their own recommendations for improvement of the system.
Evaluation:
The students will be evaluated based on the ACGME competencies.  Students will receive a short pre-test and post-test of geriatric cases with multiple choice answers they are expected to complete at the beginning and again at the end of the rotation with expectation of a post-test score >/=80% correct .  Grades are determined by:  50%  clinical evaluation, 25% continuity patient summary writeup, 15% post-test score, 10% journal article presentation.  
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40
2,4
Yawman, Anne
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MDE 8148 Geriatrics and Health Disparities
This elective integrates students into the care of elderly and those who are victims of health disparity in our community.  Suncoast Community Centers and the Crisis Center of Tampa Bay  have operated for many years in Tampa General Hospital as safety net systems for patients without insurance or without social resources.  We propose to introduce students to the care of patients in the most vulunerable of populations.  They will be assigned to the clinic 5 days per week consisting of one-third day to the Crisis Center and one-third day to senior connections and one-third to house-calls. We hope that the experience in this setting will assist with problem identification and intervention, improve outcomes, reduce costs and result in fewer hospital admissions. 
Objectives:
By the end of the elective students will be able to:
  1. Compare and contrast the health needs and problems encountered in indigent care in the elderly
  2. Compare and contrast the health needs and problems in an urban setting
  3. Introduce and sensitize the students to cross cultural issues in healthcare
  4. Understand the business application of Obamacare and intersection of poverty at the expense of healthcare
  5. Understand reasons for involvement in Tampa social care network
  6. Understand firsthand what a health disparity is and be able to take steps to fix it
  7. Develop an understanding of the costs and complexity of dealing with poorly compliant patients, elderly patients and patients with loss of cognitive ability
  8. Become knowledgeable in the importance of recognizing early onset cognitive decline, and counseling the family
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course based on clinical evaluations completed by residents and faculty that worked. Some questions will be based on ACGME competencies.  There will also be graded patient write-ups and an oral presentation on a topic of interest to Dr. LaMartin and staff of Suncoast Community Health Center.  The grade will be 75% of course evaluation, 10% graded write-ups, and 10% oral presentation.  Students will be evaluated mid-way through the course by the course director or their designee and at the end of the course based on medical knowledge, medical skills, and demonstrated professionalism.     
SCHC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40
2,4
Guerra, Lucy
Clinical
Int Med
General 
 MDE 8340 ICU Procedures for Internists
 
This elective integrates students into the nocturnal critical care team and provides students with an overview and introduction to critical care procedures and cardiopulmonary ultrsound. Emphasis will be placed on the following technical skills : cardiopulmonary ultrasound, airway management and endotracheal intubation, invasive and non-invasive ventilation, chest tube insertion, central line placement, arterial line placement, shiley/dialysis catheter placement, swan ganz catherization, thoracentesis, paracentesis, and lumbar puncture. 
Objectives:
By the end of the elective students will be able to:
  1. Perform focused cardiopulmonary ultrasound and present their findings in an organized fashion.
  2. Understand the basic principles of sterile technique, appropriate time-out, and perform adequate informed consent.
  3. Be able to assess a patient's respiratory satus and develop basic airway management skills, including mask ventilation, tracheal intubation, and laryngeal mask airway insertion.
  4. Be able to understand the basics of non-invasive and invasive mechanical ventilation and contraindications and indications.  Participants will be required to make clinical decisions (with supervision) about which ventilatory modality is most appropriate during real patient encounters and justify their decision.
  5. Develop skills in performing critical care procedures with an emphasis on thoracentesis, paracentesis, lumbar puncture, and insertion of: central line, arterial line, swan ganz, chest tube, dialysis catheters and performing endotracheal intubation.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the main intensivist at the end of the course based on direct observation, completion of a written checklist of procedures, performance of these procedures (under supervision), medical knowledge regarding the procedures, interpersonal and communication skills, self-directed learning, and demonstrated professionalism.      
 TGH
 1 - 11 
Year 4 Status 
40 
Bugarin, Elizabeth
Clinical 
Int Med 
General 
 MDE 8349 Electronic Med ICU and Telemedicine
This elective integrates students into the electronic medical ICU team of intensivists, nursing, and IT. Telecommunication was integrated into Tampa General Hospital in 2017, and this system improves monitoring and augments care delivery to ICU patients from a remote location in addition to the team present within the hospital. The software continually monitors and evalutes patients physiologic and laboratory data and allows for detection of subtle earlying warning changes in status and allows for immediate care interventions, reduce time between problem identification and intervention, improve outcomes, reduce costs, and shorter lengths of stay. Patient data is captured in one place, easing recordkeeping while facilitating convenient access to a pateint record by all members of the care team. The reporting system tracks clinical outcomes, resource utilization and operational efficiency. The patient's physician remains in charge of care, and the eICU staff execute the bedside physicians care plan, as the patient's care team may not always be in the ICU while caring for other patients. The eICU intensivists notify the inpatient care team immediately for all major changes in patient status.  There is a severe shortage of intensivists actively practicing in the United States and less than 15% of ICUs receive dedicated intensivist care.
Objectives:
By the end of the elective students will be able to:
  1. Compare and contrast the indications for electronic medical ICUs versus standard care without an eICU
  2. With supervision, begin to demonstrate the skills necessary to evaluate and manage how eICUs function
  3. With supervision, begin to demonstrate systems-based practice skills as it relates to cost, patient safety, length of stay, and patient outcome benefits of eICU monitoring
  4. With supervision, begin to demonstrate the impact of eICU on fellow/resident training as it relates to performing common eICU tasks and interpretation of patient diagnostic/therapeutic data and communicating findings/recommendations back to the remote site.
  5. With supervision, begin to demonstrate the knowledge and skills centered around the limitations of eICU and its operational costs.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course based on direct observation of medical knowledge, interpersonal and communication skills, performance of common eICU clinical management functions, self-directed learning, and demonstrated professionalism.    
TGH 
  1 - 11
Year 4 Status 
40 
Cao, Kimberley
Clinical 
Int Med
General
 MDE 8774 Bedside Ultrasonography
Contact:
Dr. Alfredo Peguero-Rivera
Alfredo.Peguero-Rivera@va.gov
James Burrola
Ph: 813 978-5947
Report to:
Second Floor Dialysis Unit
Monday 8:00 am
This elective will introduce medical students to the practice and theory of bedside ultrasonography . Bedside ultrasonography is a very useful tool for diagnosis of a variety of clinical conditions.  The elective will provide medical students the essentials of FAST and modified FAST exam for the diagnosis of hypotension, and BLUE protocol for the diagnosis of lung diseases.  The student will round with the preceptors daily and will interact with patients actively.
Please note, medical students will be expected to report to the VA Monday through Friday 0800 to 1630.
During the course of the clinical rotations, participants will be encouraged to pursue the following:
Required Visual videos provided to the students:
  1. Advance lung ultrasound applications
  2. Rapid ultrasound for shock and hypotension
  3. Cases in emergency ultrasound            
  4. Introduction to adult echocardiography
Required Reading for all participants:
  1. AIUM practice guideline  for the performance of the focused assesment with sonography for trauma (FAST) examination) J Ultrasound Med. 2014 feb 27 (2);313-8
  2. Relevance of lung ultrasound in the diagnosis of acute respiratory failure The BLUE Protocol. Chest 2008 134; 117-125
Suggested additional ultrasound literature journals and books:  
  • Sign up for Athens access at VA Medical Library (2nd floor) for full access
Objectives:
  1. Understand the principles and limitations of bedside ultrasonography
  2. Be familiar with the use and interpretation of the technical capabilities of bedside  ultrasound sonography
  3. Understand, execute and interpret   the FAST and FAST modified ultrasonographic protocols in the diagnosis of hypotension
  4. Understand, execute and interpret the Blue and BLUE modified protocols in the diagnosis of dyspnea
  5. Be able to articulate quality improvement needs and outcomes relevant to the bedside ultrasonography field and/or present a clinical pertinent bedside ultrasound article
Evaluation:
  1. Oral feedback will be provided at the mid-point, and both oral and written evaluation will be reviewed with the participant at end of the elective period.
  2. Evaluation components will consist clinical performance (timeliness, interest, punctuality, % sessions attended)
  3. Clinical knowledge and competency pattern ultrasonographic recognition post-test scoring.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
40
2
Pegeuro-Rivera, Alfredo
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 8121 Hospital Med & Patient Safety
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
This rotation is designed to further the fourth year medical student’s education in internal medicine and examine the topics of patient safety and preventable medical errors. During the month, the student will provide hospitalist care for a limited number of inpatients admitted to the general medical wards under the direct mentorship of medicine attendings, simulating the role of private hospitalist physicians. There is no call or weekend work. Integrated into the clinical duties is a curriculum focused on medical errors and patient safety. It includes didactic sessions, practical exercises in identifying engineering hazards, and safety workshops. In 1999, The Institute of Medicine published To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System asserting a sobering statistic: tens of thousands of patients die each year in the U.S. from medical errors. Since that landmark publication, the concepts of medical errors and patient safety have surged into the spotlight of the media, the public, and policymakers. This rotation creates a new framework for students/physicians to consider patient safety and prevention of medical errors while advancing the internal medicine skills of the student, preparing them for internship.
Objectives:
  1. Further the student’s education of internal medicine
  2. Expose the student to the concepts of patient safety and preventable medical errors
  3. Introduce the student to hospitalist medicine 
  4. Explore the "systems" approach to medical errors
  5. Understand human factor engineering in the medical environment
  6. Participate in root cause analysis process
Learning Outcomes:
  1. Gain understanding of Hospitalist medicine concepts
  2. Understand human factor engineering and cite specific patient care examples
  3. Manage patients in the capacity of an acting intern during business hours, answering pages, writing orders and notes, and admitting and discharging them
  4. Participate in root cause analyses if opportunity is available
  5. Attend learning conferences with the housestaff
  6. Present a morning report or noon conference on patient safety
  7. Understand the "system" approach to medical errors and contrast that with the "blame" system
Evaluation:
Supervising attending evaluations, completion of skills modules, quiz scores, presentation evaluations, etc.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
40
2,4
Reiss, Alexander 
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 8332 Elective in Rural Medicine
Health Resource Alliance (Pasco), Suncoast Community Health Centers (Hillsborough), DeSoto Memorial Hospital (Arcadia), or other rural sites

This elective is designed to introduce senior students to the practice of medicine in a rural community. Under the supervision of clinical faculty, students will have the opportunity to practice in a private office or in a community/migrant health center. Students will also round with the preceptor in the hospital. This elective will provide students with a better understanding of rural medicine and the tremendous health needs of underserved rural and migrant populations. Housing will be provided for students at DeSoto Memorial Hospital. Gulfcoast South AHEC will provide students with a fixed travel reimbursement.
 Objectives:
  1. Compare and contrast the health needs and problems encountered in rural practice to those encountered in prior urban rotations
  2. Identify the unique opportunities and challenges to medical practice and life in a rural area
  3. Introduce/sensitize the student to cross-cultural issues in health care
  4. Understand mechanisms and indications for consultation and referral in rural practice
  5. Evaluate the business management of rural practice including availability of organized funding for patient care, managed care, etc.
Evaluation:
The clinical faculty will evaluate the progress and performance of the student in the clinical setting(s).
This elective must be scheduled through Anne Wenders from the AHEC office. Final arrangements for the elective must be made through the Ms. Wenders (amaynard@health.usf.edu) in conjunction with Gulfcoast North or Gulfcoast South AHEC.
AHEC
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
1
0
44
2,4
Faculty
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 8334 Acting Medicine Internship
Students will function as acting interns on the general ward teams at Lehigh Valley Cedar Crest Hospital. They will be given direct patient care clinical duties and responsibilities usually assigned to the first year house officer. The medical team residents and attending will closely supervise these clinical responsibilities. The level of clinical responsibilities will be distinctly above that of a third year clerkship rotation in internal medicine. Participating students will have an in depth autonomous inpatient experience so they may confidently assume such care in their PGY1 year regardless of their career choice. Mandatory attendance, excluding patient emergencies, is expected at morning report, noon conference, and grand rounds. Students are also encouraged to participate in the monthly journal club and the M&M conferences.
 Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to hospital based care and management.
  2. Student will learn how to perform adequate and thorough history and physical examinations.
  3. Write appropriate progress notes and all orders for therapeutic and diagnostic intervention with appropriate counter signature.
  4. Participate on short call every fifth night as scheduled with the assigned team.
  5. Learn and participate in internal medicine procedures including: paracentesis, thoracentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement if available
  6. Transition patients from the Medical Intensive Care Unit.
  7. Communicate inpatient management and outcomes with patient’s primary care physician.
  8. Participate and learn appropriate discharge planning, utilization of system based care in the management of their patients and how to do discharge summaries.
  9. Learn to interpret EKG’s, radiographic studies, PFT’s and appropriate lab diagnostic studies.
Evaluation:
Evaluation is based solely on clinical evaluations from your preceptors.
LVH-CC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
6
0
40-64
4
Doherty, Thomas
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 8334 Acting Medicine Internship
Contact:
Dr. Pabbathi
Smitha.Pabbathi@moffitt.org
813-745-6657
Students will function as acting interns on the general ward teams at Moffitt Cancer Center. They will be given direct patient care clinical duties and responsibilities usually assigned to the first year house officer. The medical team residents and attending will closely supervise these clinical responsibilities. The level of clinical responsibilities will be distinctly above that of a third year clerkship rotation in internal medicine. Participating students will have an in depth autonomous inpatient experience so they may confidently assume such care in their PGY1 year regardless of their career choice. Mandatory attendance, excluding patient emergencies, is expected at morning report, noon conference, and grand rounds. Students are also encouraged to participate in the monthly journal club and the M&M conferences.
This rotation allows the medical student to learn how to diagnose and treat common medical conditions and exposes the student to medical emergencies that are more common in cancer patients. During this rotation, the student will be required to attend morning report, noon conferences and Grand rounds. The student will perform history and physical examinations with the supervision of attending physicians and resident, write daily progress notes and assist in discharge planning. No overnight call or weekend responsibilities however students will be expected to stay late during certain days of the week to assist with admissions. Students will round with IHM A inpatient service
 Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to hospital based care and management.
  2. Student will learn how to perform adequate and thorough history and physical examinations.
  3. Write appropriate progress notes and all orders for therapeutic and diagnostic intervention with appropriate counter signature.
  4. Participate on night call every fifth night as scheduled with the assigned team.
  5. Learn and participate in internal medicine procedures including: paracentesis, thoracentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement
  6. Transition of patients from the Medical Intensive Care Unit.
  7. Communicate inpatient management and outcomes with patient’s primary care physician.
  8. Participate and learn appropriate discharge planning, utilization of system based care in the management of their patients and how to do discharge summaries.
  9. Learn to interpret EKG’s, radiographic studies, PFT’s and appropriate lab diagnostic studies.
MCC
 1-2, 4-11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-64
4
Pabbathi, Smitha
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 8334 Acting Medicine Internship
Students will function as acting interns on the general ward teams. They will be given direct patient care clinical duties and responsibilities usually assigned to the first year house officer. The medical team residents and attending will closely supervise these clinical responsibilities. The level of clinical responsibilities will be distinctly above that of a third year clerkship rotation in internal medicine. Participating students will have an in depth autonomous inpatient experience so they may confidently assume such care in their PGY1 year regardless of their career choice. Mandatory attendance, excluding patient emergencies, is expected at morning report, noon conference, and grand rounds. Students are also encouraged to participate in the monthly journal club and the M&M conferences.
 Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to hospital based care and management.
  2. Student will learn how to perform adequate and thorough history and physical examinations.
  3. Write appropriate progress notes and all orders for therapeutic and diagnostic intervention with appropriate counter signature.
  4. Participate on night call every fifth night as scheduled with the assigned team.
  5. Learn and participate in internal medicine procedures including: paracentesis, thoracentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement
  6. Transition of patients from the Medical Intensive Care Unit.
  7. Communicate inpatient management and outcomes with patient’s primary care physician.
  8. Participate and learn appropriate discharge planning, utilization of system based care in the management of their patients and how to do discharge summaries.
  9. Learn to interpret EKG’s, radiographic studies, PFT’s and appropriate lab diagnostic studies.
TGH
 1-2, 4-11
Yr 4 Status
5
0
40-64
4
O'Brien, Kevin
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 8334 Acting Medicine Internship
Students will function as acting interns on the general ward teams. They will be given direct patient care clinical duties and responsibilities usually assigned to the first year house officer. The medical team residents and attending will closely supervise these clinical responsibilities. The level of clinical responsibilities will be distinctly above that of a third year clerkship rotation in internal medicine. Participating students will have an in depth autonomous inpatient experience so they may confidently assume such care in their PGY1 year regardless of their career choice. Mandatory attendance, excluding patient emergencies, is expected at morning report, noon conference, and grand rounds. Students are also encouraged to participate in the monthly journal club and the M&M conferences.
 Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to hospital based care and management.
  2. Student will learn how to perform adequate and thorough history and physical examinations.
  3. Write appropriate progress notes and all orders for therapeutic and diagnostic intervention with appropriate counter signature.
  4. Participate on night call every fifth night as scheduled with the assigned team.
  5. Learn and participate in internal medicine procedures including: paracentesis, thoracentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement
  6. Transition of patients from the Medical Intensive Care Unit.
  7. Communicate inpatient management and outcomes with patient’s primary care physician.
  8. Participate and learn appropriate discharge planning, utilization of system based care in the management of their patients and how to do discharge summaries.
  9. Learn to interpret EKG’s, radiographic studies, PFT’s and appropriate lab diagnostic studies.
T-VAH
 1-2, 4-11
Yr 4 Status
5
0
40-64
4
O'Brien, Kevin
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 8335 General Internal Medicine Consult Service
Contact:
Dr. Pabbathi
Smitha.Pabbathi@moffitt.org
813-745-6657
Students will work directly with the Medicine attending on the Internal Medicine Consultation Service at Moffitt Cancer Center. The student will be exposed to a variety of different medical issues in the setting of an oncological diagnosis. This will include preoperative evaluations, as well as management of postoperative complications such as Atrial Fibrillation, Pulmonary Embolism, Hypertension Urgencies/Emergencies. This experience will prepare and enhance the student’s critical thinking skills needed to think as an Internal Medicine Consultant. Morning report, noon conferences, Grand Rounds, and board review will also be a required portion of this rotation. 
Objectives:
  1. Conduct a preoperative evaluation.
  2. Evaluate and treat postoperative complications such as Atrial Fibrillation, Diabetes, Hypertension Urgencies/Emergencies.
  3. Approach for diagnosis and treatment of VTE in a cancer patient. 
  4. Attend Morning Report, Noon conference, Grand Rounds and Internal Medicine Board Review.
MCC
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
1
0
44
4
Pabbathi, Smitha
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 8335 General Int Med Consult Srvc
This course offers the opportunity to participate in the major practice activities of the general internist. The student will be a member of the general internal medicine consultation team at one of the hospitals. The consultation team evaluates and treats medical problems of patients on other services and participates in the perioperative care of surgical patients.
TGH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
1
0
44
2
O'Brien, Kevin
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 8953 Integrative Clinical Skills
This elective offers the fourth year medical student a review of pertinent skills for a smoother transition to internship. The course will predominantly consist of case based conferences which will be a review such topics as writing orders, common overnight call issues, common procedures, reading EKG, CXR, and ABGs, electrolyte abnormalities, ACLS protocol, the role of the resident as an educator and evaluator, tips for improving patient and family communication, review of advance directives and the utilization of other resources. Students will be required to shadow the cross cover resident during the work week twice during the month. Attendance to various internal medicine conferences (morning report and noon conference) is optional.
Objectives:
  1. Diagnose and treat common overnight call issues
  2. Practice and learn common bedside medical procedures
  3. Improve teaching skills to be a better educator
  4. Improve communication skills specifically delivering bad news
  5. Familiarize yourself with ancillary medical services in the hospital/community and how these services can improve patient care
  6. Learn skills to improve balancing the rigors of residency with personal/social endeavors
Learning Outcomes:
At the end of the month, students should feel more comfortable with the skills that will make their transition to residency smoother and to maximize the learning environment in residency.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated on attendance, participation in case based conferences, involvement in cross cover calls, and an end of the month presentation.
TGH
11
Yr 4 Status
12
0
40
4
Mai, Cuc
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 9940 Honors AI in Internal Medicine
Contact:
Dr. Pabbathi
Smitha.Pabbathi@moffitt.org
813-745-6657
Report to:
Round with IHM A inpatient service

Students will function as acting interns on the general ward teams. They will be given direct patient care clinical duties and responsibilities usually assigned to the first year house officer. The medical team residents and attending will closely supervise these clinical responsibilities. The level of clinical responsibilities will be distinctly above that of a third year clerkship rotation in internal medicine. Participating students will have an in depth autonomous inpatient experience so they may confidently assume such care in their PGY1 year regardless of their career choice. Mandatory attendance, excluding patient emergencies, is expected at morning report, noon conference, and grand rounds. Students are also encouraged to participate in the monthly journal club and the M&M conferences.
 Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to hospital based care and management.
  2. Students will learn how to perform adequate and thorough history and physical examinations.
  3. Write appropriate progress notes and all orders for therapeutic and diagnostic intervention with appropriate counter signature.
  4. Participate on night call every fifth night as scheduled with the assigned team.
  5. Learn and participate in internal medicine procedures including: paracentesis, thoracentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement.
  6. Transition of patients from the Medical Intensive Care Unit.
  7. Communicate inpatient management and outcomes with patient’s primary care physician.
  8. Participate and learn appropriate discharge planning, utilization of system based care in the management of their patients and how to do discharge summaries.
  9. Learn to interpret EKG’s, radiographic studies, PFT’s and appropriate lab diagnostic studies.
As part of the Honors Medicine Acting Internship, students must either complete a research project (i.e. submit an abstract to a regional or national meeting), attend a Florida ACP meeting, or make an advocacy trip with the ACP.
MCC
3
Yr 4 Status
1
0
64
4
Pabbathi, Smitha
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 9940 Honors AI in Internal Medicine
Students will function as acting interns on the general ward teams. They will be given direct patient care clinical duties and responsibilities usually assigned to the first year house officer. The medical team residents and attending will closely supervise these clinical responsibilities. The level of clinical responsibilities will be distinctly above that of a third year clerkship rotation in internal medicine. Participating students will have an in depth autonomous inpatient experience so they may confidently assume such care in their PGY1 year regardless of their career choice. Mandatory attendance, excluding patient emergencies, is expected at morning report, noon conference, and grand rounds. Students are also encouraged to participate in the monthly journal club and the M&M conferences.
 Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to hospital based care and management.
  2. Students will learn how to perform adequate and thorough history and physical examinations.
  3. Write appropriate progress notes and all orders for therapeutic and diagnostic intervention with appropriate counter signature.
  4. Participate on night call every fifth night as scheduled with the assigned team.
  5. Learn and participate in internal medicine procedures including: paracentesis, thoracentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement.
  6. Transition of patients from the Medical Intensive Care Unit.
  7. Communicate inpatient management and outcomes with patient’s primary care physician.
  8. Participate and learn appropriate discharge planning, utilization of system based care in the management of their patients and how to do discharge summaries.
  9. Learn to interpret EKG’s, radiographic studies, PFT’s and appropriate lab diagnostic studies.
As part of the Honors Medicine Acting Internship, students must either complete a research project (i.e. submit an abstract to a regional or national meeting), attend a Florida ACP meeting, or make an advocacy trip with the ACP.
TGH
3
Yr 4 Status
5
0
64
4
O'Brien, Kevin
Clinical
Int Med
General
 MEL 9940 Honors AI in Internal Medicine
Students will function as acting interns on the general ward teams. They will be given direct patient care clinical duties and responsibilities usually assigned to the first year house officer. The medical team residents and attending will closely supervise these clinical responsibilities. The level of clinical responsibilities will be distinctly above that of a third year clerkship rotation in internal medicine. Participating students will have an in depth autonomous inpatient experience so they may confidently assume such care in their PGY1 year regardless of their career choice. Mandatory attendance, excluding patient emergencies, is expected at morning report, noon conference, and grand rounds. Students are also encouraged to participate in the monthly journal club and the M&M conferences.
 Objectives:
  1. Introduce the student to hospital based care and management.
  2. Students will learn how to perform adequate and thorough history and physical examinations.
  3. Write appropriate progress notes and all orders for therapeutic and diagnostic intervention with appropriate counter signature.
  4. Participate on night call every fifth night as scheduled with the assigned team.
  5. Learn and participate in internal medicine procedures including: paracentesis, thoracentesis, lumbar puncture, central line placement.
  6. Transition of patients from the Medical Intensive Care Unit.
  7. Communicate inpatient management and outcomes with patient’s primary care physician.
  8. Participate and learn appropriate discharge planning, utilization of system based care in the management of their patients and how to do discharge summaries.
  9. Learn to interpret EKG’s, radiographic studies, PFT’s and appropriate lab diagnostic studies.
As part of the Honors Medicine Acting Internship, students must either complete a research project (i.e. submit an abstract to a regional or national meeting), attend a Florida ACP meeting, or make an advocacy trip with the ACP.
T-VAH
3
Yr 4 Status
5
0
64
4
O'Brien, Kevin
Clinical
Int Med
General
MEL 7320M Extern-Internal Medicine
EXT
 1 - 7
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
44
4
Faculty
Externship
Int Med
General
MEL 9999M Indep Study-Internal Med
USFMS or LVHN
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
No Limit
0
40
2,4
Faculty
Indep Study
Int Med
Hem-Onc
 MDE 8280 Hematology and Oncology
This course will expose the medical student to a wide range of hematologic and oncologic disease processes. In the outpatient setting, an emphasis will be made on the proper screening, pathophysiology, staging, natural history and treatment of cancer. The inpatient service will both have a primary management role and consultative aspect. The student will be exposed to both common and uncommon hematologic problems with emphasis on recognition, treatment and natural history of these disorders. Students will also spend time in multidisciplinary clinics.
Objectives:
  1. Identify key points in a patient's case and use them to make management decisions
  2. Recall the important aspects of the history and physical in evaluating a patient with cancer or a hematologic disorder
  3. Identify detailed aspects of the CBC, coagulation studies, and peripheral blood smear
  4. Will demonstrate the ability to accurately interpret CT scans and MRI imaging of oncology patients
  5. Strengthen skills to develop a differential diagnosis and be able to justify studies ordered and rational behind treatment recommendations
  6. Be able to compare and contrast mechanism of action and side effects of traditional chemotherapy and new targeted therapy.
  7. Differentiate between palliative care and hospice care and decide when to transition patient to hospice
  8. Appreciation for  the importance of clinical trails and the process of screening patients
  9. Appreciation for multidisciplinary care of oncology patients
Evaluation:
  1. Students will be evaluated in the office/clinic by the faculty hematology/oncology attending. In the hospital setting students will be evaluated by the rounding attending and APC (advanced practice clinician).
  2. Students will be given a brief multiple choice test at the start of the rotation and again at the completion to gauge progress. Test will cover basic concepts in hematology/oncology.
  3. Students will be given assignments. For example: Students will be given a interesting case by the attending to review. The case will be presented and reviewed with the attending. Students will be asked to complete a clinic question based on a case they were involved in. They will answer the question with support from the medical literature.
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40
4
Scalia, William
Clinical
Int Med
ID, International
 MDE 8320 Infectious Disease Elective
The primary focus of this rotation is the inpatient consultative service. Students will be expected to round collaboratively with a team including rotating residents, physician assistants, our ID pharmacist, as well as the attending physician. To complement this focus, the student will participate in ID journal club, case management series, and medical grand rounds. The student will also be exposed to other ID-related services, including microbiology and laboratory medicine, infection control, travel medicine, HIV, wound management, and antibiotic stewardship.
Objectives:
  1. Apply the principles of comprehensive history taking and physical examination to generate a differential diagnosis and to select advanced testing modalities.
  2. Improve their assessment and management of disease processes using evidence-based literature and interdisciplinary communication.
  3. Apply principles of empiricism and stewardship to antibiotic selection and mangement.
  4. Improve familiarity with antimicrobial therapies, including antibiotic classes, adverse drug reactions and interactions.
  5. Understand various states of immunosuppression (hereditary, drug-induced, acquired, organ transplant-related) and infections related to these.
  6. Summarize Infection Control protocol to minimize spread of disease.
  7. Deduce the appropriate method for treating microbial infections.
  8. Identify the correct type of antibiotic to treat bacterial Infections.
LVH-CC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40
2,4
Templer, Suzanne
Clinical
Int Med
ID, International
 MDT 8200A Integrated Sciences in Inf Dis
Contact:
Tammy Grice
Ph: 813-844-4187
tsgrice@gmail.com

Dr. Burt Anderson
banderso@health.usf.edu
Clinical experiences are directed by the 3 section leaders – Drs. Somboonwit, Casanas, and Alrabaa with 2 students max per section. Students would be together for didactic material and presentations.
Goals and Objectives:
This course will combine evidenced-based didactic lectures on infectious diseases (including antibiotics, infection, and epidemiology), interaction with the clinical laboratory, and rounding with patients exemplifying diseases and principles discussed. Topics include pathophysiology of common infections as well as those prevalent in hospitals and the immunocompromised. Relevant immunology and microbiology principles will be stressed. Students will have opportunities and responsibilities for self-study and scholarly/case presentation.
A typical day of this rotation is seeing assigned patients in the morning, didactic teaching, and rounds in the afternoon. Attending TGH internal medicine morning report and internal medicine noon conference is highly encouraged. Additional didactic teaching is provided on Monday from 6-7 pm and Friday from 8-9:30am. On the first day of rotation,  students should report to the Infectious Disease Education office at TGH Room G323 (Tammy Grice, 813-844-4187)
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated based on literature research for clinical rounds, presentations, and discussions.
TGH
 10
Yr 4 Status
10
0
40
2
Anderson, Burt
Basic Science   
Int Med
ID, International
 MEL 8310 Infect Disease & Interntl Med
Contact:
Dr. John Greene
John.Greene@moffitt.org
Facilities include patient populations with bacteremias, urinary tract infections, pneumonias and HIV related issues.  (If there is an interest specifically in Bone Marrow Transplant Infectious Diseases, see MEL 8362.)  All of the sites for ID are run utilizing a team approach directed by an Infectious Diseases attending on service and a variety of potential team members including but not limited to an Infectious Diseases fellow and other trainees.  In addition to participating in bedside consultative rounds evaluating patients, there are regular didactic teachings.  Traditionally students participate in teaching their peers by researching and presenting a mini topic to the group during one of the teaching sessions.  The student’s progress during the elective rotation will be assessed during bedside and teaching rounds by the attending.  Monthly microbiology interdisciplinary rounds are shared by James A. Haley and Moffitt Cancer Center’s ID services. Moffitt Cancer Center's specialty population consists of oncology and hematological units and an orthopedic oncology unit.
Objectives:
  1. Provide fundamental information concerning techniques employed in diagnosing infectious diseases
  2. Obtain an appreciation for the natural history of infectious disease so as to better understand whether therapy is affecting the course of disease in a given patient
  3. Comprehend the process of selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy
Evaluation:
Midway through the elective a formal evaluation process results in generation of written comments that are communicated to the student so that he/she can appreciate how his/her performance has been to that point. Daily, critical review of presentation of patient data will be incorporated in teaching rounds to provide guidance for the student to strengthen skills in those areas.
MCC
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
4
0
44
2,4
Greene, John
Clinical
Int Med
ID, International
 MEL 8310 Infect Disease & Interntl Med
Objectives:
  1. Provide fundamental information concerning techniques employed in diagnosing infectious diseases
  2. Obtain an appreciation for the natural history of infectious disease so as to better understand whether therapy is affecting the course of disease in a given patient
  3. Comprehend the process of selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy
Methods:
The clinical rotations conducted are structured to permit students to function, with guidance by advanced subspecialty residents and attending physicians, as consultants in infectious disease. In addition to participation in bedside consultative evaluation of patients and the presentation of findings on daily teaching rounds, students are required to employ standard textbooks, contemporary literature and laboratory data in an organized fashion to arrive at "best fit" diagnoses. Progress of patients will be assessed and recorded daily. Fellows and attendings will provide regular didactic teaching, and students will participate in the teaching activity by preparing and presenting a comprehensive review of an important clinical topic in infectious diseases for a Division Conference. The student's progress during the elective will be monitored during daily teaching rounds by the attending faculty.
Evaluation:
Midway through the elective a formal evaluation process results in generation of written comments that are communicated to the student so that he/she can appreciate how his/her performance has been to that point. Daily, critical review of presentation of patient data will be incorporated in teaching rounds to provide guidance for the student to strengthen skills in those areas.
TGH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
3
0
44
2,4
Sinnott, John
Clinical
Int Med
ID, International
 MEL 8310 Infect Disease & Interntl Med
Contact:
Verona Allen
verona.allen@va.gov
Objectives:
  1. Provide fundamental information concerning techniques employed in diagnosing infectious diseases
  2. Obtain an appreciation for the natural history of infectious disease so as to better understand whether therapy is affecting the course of disease in a given patient
  3. Comprehend the process of selection of appropriate antimicrobial therapy
Methods:
The clinical rotations conducted are structured to permit students to function, with guidance by advanced subspecialty residents and attending physicians, as consultants in infectious disease. In addition to participation in bedside consultative evaluation of patients and the presentation of findings on daily teaching rounds, students are required to employ standard textbooks, contemporary literature and laboratory data in an organized fashion to arrive at "best fit" diagnoses. Progress of patients will be assessed and recorded daily. Fellows and attendings will provide regular didactic teaching, and students will participate in the teaching activity by preparing and presenting a comprehensive review of an important clinical topic in infectious diseases for a Division Conference. The student's progress during the elective will be monitored during daily teaching rounds by the attending faculty.
Evaluation:
Midway through the elective a formal evaluation process results in generation of written comments that are communicated to the student so that he/she can appreciate how his/her performance has been to that point. Daily, critical review of presentation of patient data will be incorporated in teaching rounds to provide guidance for the student to strengthen skills in those areas.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
44
2,4
Sinnott, John
Clinical
Int Med
ID, International
 MEL 8314 Trop Med & Pub Hlth Abroad
This course offers an opportunity to practice health care in a foreign country with emphasis on tropical infectious diseases and epidemiology. An urban and rural hospital/clinic at a major medical school in Africa (Zimbabwe), India, or South America will be the location of the rotation. The student will learn to care for patients with acute and chronic parasitic and tropical bacterial and fungal infections as well as diseases common to all peoples. Interaction with the local clinicians will include joint lectures, direct supervised patient care, and observation of healthy and unhealthy behavior of the indigenous population. A USF faculty member with interest and expertise in tropical medicine or public health will provide the leadership and instruction for the group. At the end of the rotation, each participant will present a relevant topic concerning the diagnosis, treatment, or prevention of tropical diseases, or the epidemiology and control of major diseases of public health importance, and submit the report for publication.
Emergency medical insurance is required for all electives abroad.
EXT
 1 - 10
Yr 4 Status
2
0
44
2,4
Greene, John
Clinical
Int Med
ID, International
 MEL 8357 Infects Trnsplnt Med/Immunocom
Objectives:
The goal of this rotation is to introduce the senior students to transplant medicine and its major complications specifically infections. The student will be able to see various viral, bacterial, fungal, and mycobacterial infections in various immunocompromised hosts and apply his/her basic knowledge of the immune system and its function to clinical practice. The student will develop skills in recognizing and diagnosing unique infections. Appropriate use of antimicrobial agents including knowledge of drug interactions between antimicrobials and immunosuppressive drugs will be demonstrated.
Evaluation:
The evaluation process will be ongoing on daily basis through constructive criticism to help students’ perfect history taking, physical exam and guide them to use tests appropriately and formulate appropriate differential diagnosis. At the end of the rotation the attending physician will give an overall evaluation to the students as well students will be given the opportunity to give suggestions to help incorporate students’ needs into future rotations through this service.
TGH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
44
2,4
Montero, Jose
Clinical
Int Med
ID, International
 MEL 8363 Infections in ICU
The goal of the course is to learn to recognize, treat, and prevent infectious complications in the critically ill patient. The student will participate in the initial consultative evaluation and will follow-up patients in the various ICU's at Tampa General Hospital. This will include trauma, postoperative, medically ill, and burn patients. The student will attend weekly lectures and participate in daily critical care rounds. A practical approach to antibiotic choices and effective use of diagnostic studies will be stressed.
Evaluation:
The attending physicians will evaluate the student on a daily basis.
TGH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
44
2,4
Montero, Jose
Clinical
Int Med
Nephrology
 MEL 8313 Clinical Nephrology
The objective of this elective is to expose the fourth year medical student to the broad general principles of Clinical Nephrology. In essence, the student will be an acting intern who will, in collaboration with the renal house staff and clinical fellows, participate in the care of patients with a variety of renal and hypertensive problems. Adequate exposure to renal patients is achieved through inpatient consultations in the affiliated institutions and outpatient consultations and follow-up in the renal clinics and dialysis centers. The performance of the history and physical examination, formulation of plans for diagnosis and management, and the writing of orders for care of the patient will be the responsibility of the student who will function under supervision of the Nephrology attendings and fellows. The student will be exposed to the practice of medicine on a broad interdisciplinary service that involves dietitians, social workers, clinical nurse specialists, as well as the attending staff.
TGH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
1
0
40-44
2,4
Durr, Jacques
Clinical
Int Med
Nephrology
 MEL 8313 Clinical Nephrology
The objective of this elective is to expose the fourth year medical student to the broad general principles of Clinical Nephrology. In essence, the student will be an acting intern who will, in collaboration with the renal house staff and clinical fellows, participate in the care of patients with a variety of renal and hypertensive problems. Adequate exposure to renal patients is achieved through inpatient consultations in the affiliated institutions and outpatient consultations and follow-up in the renal clinics and dialysis centers. The performance of the history and physical examination, formulation of plans for diagnosis and management, and the writing of orders for care of the patient will be the responsibility of the student who will function under supervision of the Nephrology attendings and fellows. The student will be exposed to the practice of medicine on a broad interdisciplinary service that involves dietitians, social workers, clinical nurse specialists, as well as the attending staff.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
1
0
40-44
2,4
Durr, Jacques
Clinical
Int Med
Nephrology
 MEL 8313 Clinical Nephrology
The objective of this elective is to expose the fourth year medical student to the broad general principles of Clinical Nephrology. In essence, the student will be an acting intern who will, in collaboration with the renal house staff and clinical fellows, participate in the care of patients with a variety of renal and hypertensive problems. Adequate exposure to renal patients is achieved through inpatient consultations in the affiliated institutions and outpatient consultations and follow-up in the renal clinics and dialysis centers. The performance of the history and physical examination, formulation of plans for diagnosis and management, and the writing of orders for care of the patient will be the responsibility of the student who will function under supervision of the Nephrology attendings and fellows. The student will be exposed to the practice of medicine on a broad interdisciplinary service that involves dietitians, social workers, clinical nurse specialists, as well as the attending staff.
LVH-CC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40-44
4
Saqib, Mohammad
Clinical
Int Med
Pulm/Sleep Med
 MDE 8348 Pulmonary Transplant
This elective integrates students into the pulmonarytransplant team. Students will participate fully in the activities of this subspecialty department in both the inpatient and outpatient setting. On day one, the student will meet with a faculty member for orientation and be given an individualized schedule assuring a well-rounded experience.

The student will round with the pulmonary transplant attending on admitted patients at Tampa General Hospital and follow the patients daily to assist and augment the work of the pulmonary fellows on work and teaching rounds, including completion of new consultations and managing daily inpatients on that service. Students will be expected to participate in multi-disciplinary centered rounds with the team. 

If possible, students will also observe performance of flexible bronchoscopy when required. Students will also participate in outpatient clinic under the supervision of the pulmonary transplant attending with exposure to cystic fibrosis, chronic lung disease and interstitial lung disease, as well as MRB (medical review board) discussions regarding candidacy of potential patients for transplant. Basic reading is assigned to cover pulmonary transplant focused topics and students are expected to attend and participate in weekly Thursday afternoon pulmonary conference 3-5 pm. Students are encouraged to observe the performance of full PFTs in the PFTS laboratory.

Objectives:
By the end of the elective students will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the diagnosis and management of cystic fibrosis, end stage lung disease, interstitial lung disease.  Students will be assessed on their ability to effectively discuss these nuances in a team based care environment.
  2. Understand fundamentals of transplant evaluation, immunosuppresion, and post lung transplant complications.  Again, students will be assessed on their ability to effectively discuss these nuances in a team based care environment.
  3. Develop skills to evaluate patients with different end-stage lung diseases and to counsel them about lung transplant, palliative and end-of-life care.
  4. Acquire knowledge of timing of proceeding with lung transplant assessment according to the different end stage lung diseases.
  5. Be able to communicate effectively with other physicians and health care professionals in a very efficient and timely manner as it relates to objectives 1-4 above.
  6. Understand the factors limiting the supply of donor organs and the role of transplant programs in managing this limited resource.
  7. Understand the social and economic impact of transplant on the patient and their families and demonstrate the ability (under supervision) to have these discussions with patients.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the main transplant pulmonologist at the end of the course based on direct observation of medical knowledge, interpersonal and communication skills, self-directed learning, and demonstrated professionalism.  Likewise, they will be required to demonstrate the ability to interpret clinical data and with supervision, begin to demonstrate early management skills.   
TGH
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40
2,4
Patel, Kapil
Clinical
Int Med
Pulm/Sleep Med
 MDT 8200E Adv Respiratory Pathophysiology
This course is specifically designed to enhance student competency in Respiratory Pathophysiolgy. It will provide an overview of key concepts and present the clinical significance of principles of pulmonary physiology. Particular emphasis will be placed on recent advances in the understanding of pulmonary physiology. The course consists of in-depth reading, didactic sessions and case scenario experience. Students will prepare and present a case report.
Goals and Objectives:
The goal of the course is to provide a review of pulmonary physiology as applied to clinical scenarios. Topics will include but are not limited to Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), asthma, hyperbaric medicine and airway inflammation.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated on oral presentations, application of the principles of pulmonary physiology to clinical scenarios, the incorporation of historical and recent basic science discovery in oral case reports, and the use of references and judgment of evidence in case reports.
USFMS
 11A
Yr 4 Status
10
5
40
2
Morris, Kendall
Basic Science   
Int Med
Pulm/Sleep Med
 MEL 7388 Intro to Sleep Medicine
This elective is designed to introduce students to the practice of sleep medicine in an outpatient and inpatient setting. Under the supervision of clinical faculty, students will have the opportunity to practice in a university or hospital clinic setting. Students will also round with the preceptors in the hospital. The student will have exposure to interpretation of sleep studies and observation of the overnight recordings.
Objectives:
  1. List the clinical findings that are associated with a high pre-test probability of obstructive sleep apnea.
  2. Compare and contrast central from obstructive sleep apnea.
  3. Evaluate the business systems that are necessary for successful outcomes in the treament of patients in #1 & #2 above.
  4. Describe the various presentations of a patient that may be referred for the clinal evaluation of insomnia.
  5. Compare and contrast behavioral versus medication treatment for insomnia.
  6. List the most common abnormal behaviors that occur during sleep (parasomnias).
  7. Compare and contrast jet lag and shift work sleep disorder with advanced and delayed sleep phase syndromes (circadian rhythm disorders) in adults and children.
Methods:
The trainee will see patients at the USF, VA and TGH Sleep clinics as well as in-patient consults. Trainees will participate in the Sleep Medicine conferences during their rotations. Trainees will be provided with the introduction to scoring of a sleep study as well as direct observation of a nocturnal recording. Upon completion of this elective, the trainee will have an understanding of the various things that can go wrong with patient's sleep in the middle the night. Furthermore, they will have a plan developed as to the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to each of these disorders.
Didactics:
Rheumatology Blackboard Website includes PowerPoints , links and interactive didactics for students, weekly Rheumatology conference with faculty and trainees, and Joint Injection Workshop with simulators.
Clinical experience:
The student will have the opportunity to rotate with a variety of rheumatology faculty at sites including; USF Morsani Medical clinic, the James A. Haley VA Hospital Outpatient rheumatology clinic and inpatient rheumatology consult service, Tampa General Hospital rheumatology consult service, and 30th Street clinic. The students will be assigned to sites and faculty members in order to maximize the breadth of their clinical experience. The faculty will mentor the student during clinic sessions providing clinical teaching of rheumatologic differential diagnosis, evaluation, and management, and giving feedback on clinical skills. There are additional opportunities to have exposure to musculoskeletal ultrasound in the clinical setting.
Evaluation:
The trainee will be evaluated by the course director or his designee, at the end of the course, based on the clinical evaluations completed by all fellows and faculty who work with them. An in-service exam will assess some of the ACGME six core competencies.
Grades are determined by: 75% clinical evaluations and 25% by final examination.
  1. Learn to evaluate patients in rheumatology clinic and perform an appropriate history and physical examination, design an appropriate differential diagnosis, and diagnostic and therapeutic plans for the more common systemic rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases
  2. Recognize the clinical, laboratory, and radiographic features of the more common rheumatologic, and musculoskeletal diseases
  3. Understand the pathophysiology of the common rheumatologic, and musculoskeletal diagnoses
  4. Learn to perform knee and shoulder aspiration injection on simulation models, and have the opportunity to perform on patients in a clinical setting
The student will receive a final evaluation from the faculty preceptor with which they were assigned for the majority of their clinical experience. The student will also be evaluated on their PowerPoint presentation to faculty and trainees during the weekly rheumatology conference on a topic relevant to a patient seen in the clinical setting.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
44
2,4
Anderson, William
Clinical
Int Med
Pulm/Sleep Med
 MEL 7388 Intro to Sleep Medicine
This elective is designed to introduce students to the practice of sleep medicine in an outpatient and inpatient setting. Under the supervision of clinical faculty, students will have the opportunity to practice in a university or hospital clinic setting. Students will also round with the preceptors in the hospital. The student will have exposure to interpretation of sleep studies and observation of the overnight recordings.Objectives:
  1. List the clinical findings that are associated with a high pre-test probability of obstructive sleep apnea.
  2. Compare and contrast central from obstructive sleep apnea.
  3. Evaluate the business systems that are necessary for successful outcomes in the treament of patients in #1 & #2 above.
  4. Describe the various presentations of a patient that may be referred for the clinal evaluation of insomnia.
  5. Compare and contrast behavioral versus medication treatment for insomnia.
  6. List the most common abnormal behaviors that occur during sleep (parasomnias).
  7. Compare and contrast jet lag and shift work sleep disorder with advanced and delayed sleep phase syndromes (circadian rhythm disorders) in adults and children.
Methods:
The trainee will see patients at the USF, VA and TGH Sleep clinics as well as in-patient consults. Trainees will participate in the Sleep Medicine conferences during their rotations. Trainees will be provided with the introduction to scoring of a sleep study as well as direct observation of a nocturnal recording. Upon completion of this elective, the trainee will have an understanding of the various things that can go wrong with patient's sleep in the middle the night. Furthermore, they will have a plan developed as to the diagnostic and therapeutic approach to each of these disorders.Didactics:
Rheumatology Blackboard Website includes PowerPoints , links and interactive didactics for students, weekly Rheumatology conference with faculty and trainees, and Joint Injection Workshop with simulators.Clinical experience:
The student will have the opportunity to rotate with a variety of rheumatology faculty at sites including; USF Morsani Medical clinic, the James A. Haley VA Hospital Outpatient rheumatology clinic and inpatient rheumatology consult service, Tampa General Hospital rheumatology consult service, and 30th Street clinic. The students will be assigned to sites and faculty members in order to maximize the breadth of their clinical experience. The faculty will mentor the student during clinic sessions providing clinical teaching of rheumatologic differential diagnosis, evaluation, and management, and giving feedback on clinical skills. There are additional opportunities to have exposure to musculoskeletal ultrasound in the clinical setting.Evaluation:
The trainee will be evaluated by the course director or his designee, at the end of the course, based on the clinical evaluations completed by all fellows and faculty who work with them. An in-service exam will assess some of the ACGME six core competencies. Grades are determined by: 75% clinical evaluations and 25% by final examination. 
  1. Learn to evaluate patients in rheumatology clinic and perform an appropriate history and physical examination, design an appropriate differential diagnosis, and diagnostic and therapeutic plans for the more common systemic rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases
  2. Recognize the clinical, laboratory, and radiographic features of the more common rheumatologic, and musculoskeletal diseases
  3. Understand the pathophysiology of the common rheumatologic, and musculoskeletal diagnoses
  4. Learn to perform knee and shoulder aspiration injection on simulation models, and have the opportunity to perform on patients in a clinical setting
The student will receive a final evaluation from the faculty preceptor with which they were assigned for the majority of their clinical experience. The student will also be evaluated on their PowerPoint presentation to faculty and trainees during the weekly rheumatology conference on a topic relevant to a patient seen in the clinical setting.
TGH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
44
2,4
Anderson, William
Clinical
Int Med
Pulm/Sleep Med
 MEL 8340 Pulmonary Disease
Objectives:
  1. Be able to perform a history and physical examination as it relates to pulmonary disease
  2. Know how to order and interpret basic laboratory tests such as chest X-rays, CT scans, arterial blood gases, and pulmonary function tests
  3. Have an understanding of the common pulmonary disorders, including their diagnosis and treatment
  4. Have a working knowledge of pulmonary physiology, especially as it relates to respiratory failure and the use of respiratory therapy (ventilators, oxygen, etc.)
  5. Have a familiarity with a number of emergent conditions seen in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (Moffitt; not at T-VAH or TGH for this course)
Methods:
The student will receive training at one of our clinical institutions by evaluating patients, rounding with the consultation team, and participation in conferences. A didactic lecture series may also be given.
Evaluation:
The student will be evaluated on a daily and ongoing basis by the consult attending.
At TGH: The student will work as part of the pulmonary consult team. There is a separate MICU team at TGH so critical care medicine will not be a component of the TGH experience for this course.
At TVAH: The student will work as part of the pulmonary consult team. There is a separate MICU team staffed by students participating in the senior clerkship. This site is therefore unavailable for a critical care rotation.
TGH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
44
2,4
Solomon, David
Clinical
Int Med
Pulm/Sleep Med
 MEL 8340 Pulmonary Disease
Objectives:
  1. Be able to perform a history and physical examination as it relates to pulmonary disease
  2. Know how to order and interpret basic laboratory tests such as chest X-rays, CT scans, arterial blood gases, and pulmonary function tests
  3. Have an understanding of the common pulmonary disorders, including their diagnosis and treatment
  4. Have a working knowledge of pulmonary physiology, especially as it relates to respiratory failure and the use of respiratory therapy (ventilators, oxygen, etc.)
  5. Have a familiarity with a number of emergent conditions seen in the Medical Intensive Care Unit (Moffitt; not at T-VAH or TGH for this course)
Methods:
The student will receive training at one of our clinical institutions by evaluating patients, rounding with the consultation team, and participation in conferences. A didactic lecture series may also be given.
Evaluation:
The student will be evaluated on a daily and ongoing basis by the consult attending.
At TGH: The student will work as part of the pulmonary consult team. There is a separate MICU team at TGH so critical care medicine will not be a component of the TGH experience for this course.
At TVAH: The student will work as part of the pulmonary consult team. There is a separate MICU team staffed by students participating in the senior clerkship. This site is therefore unavailable for a critical care rotation.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
2
0
44
2,4
Solomon, David
Clinical
Int Med
Rheum
 MEL 8339 Rheumatology Clinical Elective
Contact:
Kim Harding
Ph: 813-974-2681
kharding@health.usf.edu
Rheumatology is a specialty in internal medicine devoted to the diagnosis and management of over 100 complex and interesting diseases, including musculoskeletal, and autoimmune processes. Physicians are frequently consulted for musculoskeletal complaints.  Exposure to the field of rheumatology will help the student to develop an approach to evaluate these complaints, and appreciate when a patient may have an underlying systemic rheumatic disease. Some of the diseases seen include; Scleroderma, Systemic Lupus, Inflammatory myopathies, Systemic Vasculitis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriatic  Arthritis, Ankylosing Spondylitis, Gout,Osteoporosis, and Osteoarthritis.
Objectives:
By the end of the elective, the student is expected to be able to competently:
  1. Perform a history, and musculoskeletal examination on patients presenting to the rheumatology clinic
  2. Generate a differential diagnosis in the evaluation of patients presenting with common musculoskeletal complaints
  3. Interpret relevant laboratory tests, and xrays 
  4. List the indications for arthrocentesis in general and interpret synovial fluid analysis
  5. Recognize common rheumatologic syndromes and the general principles of their management.
Evaluation:
During this elective, the student will actively participate on the rheumatology service in the outpatient setting, and will work closely with the rheumatology faculty, and fellows. In addition, the student is expected to attend and participate in the weekly educational conference, which include journal club, case presentation, and radiology-rheumatology sessions. The student’s contribution in the educational activities will be used, in conjunction with the clinical performance, for the final evaluation.
MOR/TGH/VA
 1 - 11
None
2
0
44
2,4
Valeriano, Joanne
Clinical
Int Med
Rheum
 MEL 8339 Rheumatology Clinical Elective
Rheumatic diseases are complex multi-system diseases. All subspecialties and general internists need to be familiar with the clinical aspects of these diseases. Musculoskeletal complaints, including arthritis, low back pain, sprains, and strains, are the most common reasons for patients to consult their physicians. Our clinics have an excellent balance of both common and rare musculoskeletal rheumatic diseases.
Objectives:
Be able to obtain history and perform the physical examination appropriate for rheumatic disease patients.

Be able to order and interpret pertinent X-rays and laboratory studies.
Gain an understanding of the pathogenesis, differential diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions.
Methods:
Students will work with the inpatient populations as well as the consult service in a large, multidisciplinary outpatient clinic and in a private office. Student function as part of a team consisting of a senior resident and attending rheumatologist.

Evaluation:
Students will work closely with the attending rheumatologist who will provide the assessment.
LVH-CC
 1B, 2A, 3B, 4 - 5, 7- 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
44
2,4
Ross, James
Clinical
Interdept
 
 BCC 8116 Intro to Derm, Ortho, and Rheum
This elective is a multi-disciplinary four-week course designed to enhance the student’s competence in the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal, rheumatologic and dermatologic disorders. The clinical experience, designed to gain exposure to rheumatology, sports medicine, orthopedics (outpatient injury assessment and management) and dermatology, is tailored to the student’s specialty track. Unlike the third year clerkship rotations, these clinical experiences are primarily outpatient –based. Students are given instruction followed by hands-on experience in various procedures used in each of these specialties.
Didactic highlights include:
  • Skin biopsy and suturing workshop providing hands on experience.
  • Injection and aspiration workshop utilizing injection models, followed by clinical experiences to learn to perform joint injections and aspirations on patients with direct supervision.
  • Opportunity to become familiar with hands-on musculoskeletal ultrasound in a clinical setting.
  • Didactics and clinical exposure to musculoskeletal diagnostic imaging.
  • Online and live didactics and knowledge self-checks aimed at providing a basis for increasing knowledge in these specialties serving as a great preparation for USMLE.
Objectives:
  1. Apply the skills and medical knowledge learned during the didactic sessions to evaluate patients in rheumatology, dermatology, orthopedics, and sports medicine clinics and perform an appropriate history and physical examination, design an appropriate differential diagnosis, and diagnostic and therapeutic plans for the more common systemic rheumatic disease, dermatologic, orthopedic/sports medicine, and musculoskeletal diseases
  2. Recognize the clinical, laboratory, and radiographic features of the more common rheumatologic, dermatologic, orthopedic and musculoskeletal diseases
  3. Understand the pathophysiology of the common rheumatologic, dermatologic, orthopaedic, and musculoskeletal diagnoses
LVHN
5,6,8,9,10
Yr 4 Status
10
4
40
4
Ross, James
Clinical
Interdept
 
 BCC 8116 Intro to Derm, Ortho, and Rheum
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
Contact:
Jamie Cooper
jcooper8@health.usf.edu
Faculty:
JoanneValeriano-Marcet, MD
Nishit Patel, MD
Larry Collins
This elective is a multi-disciplinary four-week course designed to enhance the student’s competence in the recognition, diagnosis, and treatment of musculoskeletal, rheumatologic and dermatologic disorders. The clinical experience, designed to provide the student with exposure to rheumatology, sports medicine, orthopedics (outpatient injury assessment and management) and dermatology, is tailored to the student’s specialty track. Unlike the third year clerkship rotations, these clinical experiences are primarily outpatient –based. Students are given instruction in and hands-on experience in various procedures used in each of these specialties.
Clinical sites include; Morsani, USF South, Tampa General Hospital, and the James A. Haley VA Hospital
Didactic highlights include:
  • Skin biopsy and suturing workshop providing hands on experience.
  • Injection and aspiration workshop utilizing injection models, followed by clinical experiences to learn to perform joint injections and aspirations on patients with direct supervision.
  • Opportunity to become familiar with hands-on musculoskeletal ultrasound in a clinical setting.
  • Didactics and clinical exposure to musculoskeletal diagnostic imaging.
  • Online and live didactics and knowledge self-checks aimed at providing a basis for increasing knowledge in these specialties serving as a great preparation for USMLE.
Objectives:
  1. Apply the skills and medical knowledge learned during the didactic sessions to evaluate patients in rheumatology, dermatology, orthopedics, and sports medicine clinics and perform an appropriate history and physical examination, design an appropriate differential diagnosis, and diagnostic and therapeutic plans for the more common systemic rheumatic disease, dermatologic, orthopedic/sports medicine, and musculoskeletal diseases.
  2. Recognize the clinical, laboratory, and radiographic features of the more common rheumatologic, dermatologic, orthopedic and musculoskeletal diseases.
  3. Understand the pathophysiology of the common rheumatologic, dermatologic, orthopedic, and musculoskeletal diagnoses.
USFMS
1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
8
2
40
4
Valeriano, Joanne
Clinical
Interdept
 
 MDC 8340 Critical Care Medicine
The goals of this clerkship are to develop an approach to the care of patients with complex, critical illnesses; to understand the physiologic and pathologic abnormalities that occur in ICU patients; and to apply science principles basic to the practice of medicine in the clinical management of complex illness. 

This elective is designed to introduce students to the practice of medicine in an intensive care unit. Under the supervision of clinical faculty, students will have the opportunity to practice in a large medical - surgical ICU LVHN – CC (40 beds), LVHN – Muhl (20 beds). Upon completion of this elective, students should understand the principles of diagnosis and management of the critically ill patient with specific emphasis in shock and respiratory failure.

Objectives:
1.  Obtain a clinical history and physical exam on a non-verbal, critically ill patient based on limited available information from pre-hospital medical personnel (i.e. EMS), ER physicians, available hospital records, and interviews with the patient’s family members.
2. Compare and contrast the health needs of the critically ill patient to those encountered in the general medical ward and outpatient settings.
3. Recognize critically ill patients with shock as well as trends in vital signs and key laboratory data that identify patients with a rapidly declining, life threatening condition or a worsening disease state that threatens a vital organ function.
4. Recognize patients with acute respiratory failure based on clinical laboratory data (i.e blood gases) and become familiar with the basics of mechanical ventilation (invasive and non-invasve).
5. Analyze and become sensitized to end of life discussions with patients and/or family members.
6. Identify and describe the proper administration and use of the intensive care unit as a scarce and limited health care resource.

After being exposed to critical care patients in a variety of disciplines, the student will demonstrate specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes relevant to critical care practice. The student will have an understanding of critical care guidelines and practices so that the student will recognize patients with immediate life threatening conditions, institute appropriate initial therapy, and outline an initial course of management for patients with serious conditions requiring critical care. 

This course will include a rotation either through a Medical ICU, Pulmonary/Critical Care Consult ICU, Anesthesia Critical Care, Coronary Critical Care Unit, Surgical/Trauma ICU, NICU, or PICU at Lehigh Valley Cedar Crest Hospital. The rotation assignment will be made based upon the student’s chosen career path. Students will be evaluated by written, oral, and/or practical methods which include direct patient contact and simulation training. In addition, the students will evaluate electro-cardiograph (ECG) tracings through weekly quizzes to enhance interpretation skills.
LVH-CC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40-80
4
Schwed-Lustgarten, Daniel
Clinical
Interdept
 
 MDC 8340 Critical Care Medicine
The goals of this clerkship are to develop an approach to the care of patients with complex, critical illnesses; to understand the physiologic and pathologic abnormalities that occur in ICU patients; and to apply science principles basic to the practice of medicine in the clinical management of complex illness. 
This elective is designed to introduce students to the practice of medicine in an intensive care unit. Under the supervision of clinical faculty, students will have the opportunity to practice in a large medical - surgical ICU LVHN – CC (40 beds), LVHN – Muhl (20 beds). Upon completion of this elective, students should understand the principles of diagnosis and management of the critically ill patient with specific emphasis in shock and respiratory failure.
Objectives:
 
1.  Obtain a clinical history and physical exam on a non-verbal, critically ill patient based on limited available information from pre-hospital medical personnel (i.e. EMS), ER physicians, available hospital records, and interviews with the patient’s family members.
 
2. Compare and contrast the health needs of the critically ill patient to those encountered in the general medical ward and outpatient settings.
 
3. Recognize critically ill patients with shock as well as trends in vital signs and key laboratory data that identify patients with a rapidly declining, life threatening condition or a worsening disease state that threatens a vital organ function.
 
4. Recognize patients with acute respiratory failure based on clinical laboratory data (i.e blood gases) and become familiar with the basics of mechanical ventilation (invasive and non-invasve).
 
5. Analyze and become sensitized to end of life discussions with patients and/or family members.
 
6. Identify and describe the proper administration and use of the intensive care unit as a scarce and limited health care resource.
 
After being exposed to critical care patients in a variety of disciplines, the student will demonstrate specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes relevant to critical care practice. The student will have an understanding of critical care guidelines and practices so that the student will recognize patients with immediate life threatening conditions, institute appropriate initial therapy, and outline an initial course of management for patients with serious conditions requiring critical care. 
This course will include a rotation either through a Medical ICU, Pulmonary/Critical Care Consult ICU, Anesthesia Critical Care, Coronary Critical Care Unit, Surgical/Trauma ICU, NICU, or PICU at Lehigh Valley Cedar Crest Hospital. The rotation assignment will be made based upon the student’s chosen career path. Students will be evaluated by written, oral, and/or practical methods which include direct patient contact and simulation training. In addition, the students will evaluate electro-cardiograph (ECG) tracings through weekly quizzes to enhance interpretation skills.

LVH-M
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-80
4
Schwed-Lustgarten, Daniel
Clinical
Interdept
 
 MDC 8340 Critical Care Medicine
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
The goals of this fourth year clerkship are to develop an approach to the care of patients with complex, critical illnesses; to understand the physiologic and pathologic abnormalities that occur in ICU patients; and to apply science principles basic to the practice of medicine in the clinical management of complex illness. 

After being exposed to critical care patients in a variety of disciplines, the student will demonstrate specific knowledge, skills, and attitudes relevant to critical care practice. The student will have an understanding of critical care guidelines and practices so that the student will recognize patients with immediate life threatening conditions, institute appropriate initial therapy, and outline an initial course of management for patients with serious conditions requiring critical care. 

This course is a selective for USF senior medical students and will include a rotation either through a Medical ICU, Pulmonary/Critical Care Consult ICU, Anesthesia Critical Care or Surgical/Trauma ICU at Tampa General Hospital or the James A. Haley Veterans Hospital. The rotation assignment will be made based upon the student’s chosen career path. Students will be evaluated by written, oral, and/or practical methods which include direct patient contact and simulation training. In addition, the students will evaluate electro-cardiograph (ECG) tracings through weekly quizzes to enhance interpretation skills.

 

USFMS
1-5, 8-11
Yr 4 Status
12
6
40-80
4
Taylor, Jennifer
Clinical
Interdept
 
BMS 6994B Schol Conc Elective-Business
USFMS
 1 - 8
None
No Limit
0
44
4
Pross, Susan
 
Interdept
 
BMS 6994D ScholConcElec-Hlth Disparities
USFMS
 1 - 8
None
No Limit
0
44
4
Pross, Susan
 
Interdept
 
BMS 6994G ScholConcElect-Med Gender
USFMS
 1 - 8
None
No Limit
0
44
4
Pross, Susan
 
Interdept
 
BMS 6994H ScholConcElect-Med Humanities
USFMS
 1 - 8
None
No Limit
0
44
4
Pross, Susan
 
Interdept
 
BMS 6994I ScholConcElect-Internat'l Med
USFMS
 1 - 8
None
No Limit
0
44
4
Pross, Susan
 
Interdept
 
BMS 6994L Schol Conc Elect-Law/Medicine
USFMS
 1 - 8
None
No Limit
0
44
4
Pross, Susan
 
Interdept
 
BMS 6994N Schol Conc Elect-Nutrition
USFMS
 1 - 8
None
No Limit
0
44
4
Pross, Susan
 
Interdept
 
BMS 6994P Schol Conc Elect-Public Health
USFMS
 1 - 8
None
No Limit
0
44
4
Pross, Susan
 
Interdept
 
BMS 6994R Schol Conc Elective-Research
USFMS
 1 - 8
None
No Limit
0
44
4
Pross, Susan
 
Interdept
 
BMS 6994S ScholConcElect-Hlth Syst Engin
USFMS
 1 - 8
None
No Limit
0
44
4
Pross, Susan
 
Interdept
 
 MDE 8030 BRIDGE Clinic Elective (Directors)
Only students elected to be the student medical directors for BRIDGE will be eligible for this elective. Students must agree to hour requirements and need to inform concurrent senior course directors of their involvement in this longitudinal course. Students should notify and obtain permission from Drs. Lucy Guerra (lguerra1@health.usf.edu) or Eduardo Gonzalez (egonzale@health.usf.edu) prior to scheduling.

This longitudinal elective would reinforce and teach the knowledge, skills and attitudes that are needed to direct a multidisciplinary healthcare clinic. Students will be required to lead and attend monthly BRIDGE clinic meetings, meet with medical advisors regularly, attend and lead BRIDGE clinics over the year, develop a presentation/poster to present at a national meeting, organize and coordinate other specialties and organizations with in BRIDGE. In all, it is expected that each student will have completed a minimum of 150 hours over the academic year. The course is longitudinal, as the responsibilities of these students will continue throughout the academic year.
Objectives:
  1. Develop skills to properly manage a multidisciplinary healthcare clinic
  2. To form and nurture professional relationships with Moffitt, Hillsborough Health Department, Quest Diagnostics, Security Personnel, Morsani
  3. Understand the Business/Finance aspect of Medicine through collaboration with Dr. Marshall and the Business Scholarly Concentration
  4. Update and renew documents for Clinic Operations including the constitution, employee contracts, fundraising documents, and banking/trust fund documents
  5. Provide access to healthcare for patients of many different backgrounds with limited access
  6. Collaborate effectively with Social Work, Public Health, Physical Therapy, Nursing, Pharmacy, and the College of Medicine to provide optimum care and services in a healthcare setting
  7. Integrate meaningful community service with instruction and reflection to enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, encourage lifelong civic engagement, and strengthen communities for the common good
Evaluation:
By the end of the elective, students should feel competent managing a multidisciplinary healthcare clinic. They will understand how to collaborate with various organizations and groups and have a sense of the business and financial needs of such a clinic. Their progress will be assessed by direct observation by the faculty medical directors, and successful completion of assigned responsibilities and projects which will include poster/presentation that will be presented at a national meeting.
USFMS
Yearlong
Yr 4 Status, BRIDGE Director
3
0
4
44
Gonzalez, Eduardo
Clinical
Interdept
 
 MDE 8030B BRIDGE Mentor Longitudinal
Any student interested in taking the longitudinal BRIDGE Clinic elective will need to apply prior to registering.  A maximum of four students can participate in the elective, so we ask that you complete the application as soon as possible. For applications contact Dr. Gonzalez.
BRIDGE Clinical Mentor Longitudinal Elective Syllabus RVSD222016.pdf

BRIDGE Clinical Mentor Longitudinal Elective Syllabus RVSD222016.pdf


This elective is designed to strengthen the clinical and mentorship skills of senior medical students by involving them in the care of an under-served patient population. Students will join the volunteer medical staff at BRIDGE Clinic in caring for the university area community, and will be expected to attend a minimum of 15 clinics. They will also mentor lower classmen under the supervision of USF and community preceptors during clinic hours. They will prepare and lead at least three teaching sessions designed to prepare lower classmen for clinical encounters. Finally, they will have the opportunity to participate in a research project benefiting either the clinic or the surrounding community.
Objectives:
  1. Identify the special challenges in working with under-served populations, cultural differences, and barriers to access of care
  2. Understand the unique constraints encountered by a free clinic
  3. Attain competency in formulating lesson plans and leading group sessions
  4. Improve clinical body of knowledge and gain proficiency in diagnosis, management, and physical exam skills in a primary care setting
  5. Collaborate with an inter-professional team in the management of patients
  6. Become familiar with community resources and their contributions to patient well-being

The elective is comprised of 3 sub-components:
  1. Weekly Clinics: The clinical mentors are expected to attend a minimum of 15 clinic nights. During clinic they will lead a medical team and will be expected to teach their lowerclassmen appropriate physical exam and diagnosis skills.
  2. Clinical Teaching Sessions: The clinical mentors will be expected to formulate and prepare small groups sessions focusing on preparing underclassmen for clinic nights at BRIDGE. This will include clinic flow, interview tactics, physical exam skills, and discussion of common complaints seen in clinic.
  3. Research Project: The clinical mentors will have the option to collaborate with directors and staff on an ongoing or new project. The project should be appropriately developed to allow for submission of an abstract to the Society of Student-Run Free Clinics’ Annual Conference.
Evaluation:
Clinical mentors will be evaluated based on punctuality, professionalism, respectfulness and engagement in teaching. Their performance will also be evaluated based on feedback from clinical preceptors. A PASS grade will be given to students who complete all required clinic nights and teaching sessions. An HONORS grade will be given to students who also choose to meaningfully participate in BRIDGE leadership activities with new volunteer workshops, first year student orientation and lunch meetings, as well as with ongoing or new research projects related to BRIDGE Clinic.  
USFMS
Yearlong
Yr 4 Status
4
0
4
44
Gonzalez, Eduardo
Clinical
Interdept
 
 MDE 8036 Multi Course-Patient Safety
Interested students must meet with Dr. Wolfson (jwolfson@health.usf.edu) prior to August. Students should be prepared to describe why they should be selected for the course.
This is an innovative, experimental course. Selected senior medical students, together with graduate students from engineering, nursing, communication and public health, will explore concepts of human error, patient safety, and related healthcare quality issues through a series of weekly seminars over three months. In addition, students will work in small interdisciplinary groups, together with faculty and staff from Tampa General Hospital and all four colleges, to identify and analyze a real patient safety problem and develop a solution. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the science relating to human error in general and human factors in particular, will master several critical skills in problem solving and error analysis, and will improve their skills in working together with other professionals in the collaborative resolution of a complex problem. Medical Students will receive credit for one block rotation, although the time commitment will be approximately 6 hours per week for three months (3 hours of seminar and 3 hours of small group work.) Invited experts will give many of the seminars, together with USF faculty from the five colleges. Each interdisciplinary group will be asked to give a summary presentation of their work and submit a referenced paper describing the project.
Objectives:
  1. Explain the psychologic basis of human error
  2. Summarize our understanding of error in medical practice
  3. Explain the classification of medical error in at least one specialty of medical practice
  4. Identify and analyze an actual patient safety problem at Tampa General Hospital
  5. Perform a root cause analysis of a medical error
  6. As a member of an interdisciplinary team, provide a feasible solution to a real patient safety problem
Evaluation:
The student will be evaluated by course faculty, based on participation in class seminars and on the submitted interdisciplinary patient safety project.
 
USFMS
 9 - 11
Yr 4 Status
10
0
6
12
Wolfson, Jay
 
Interdept
 
 MDE 8047 Healthcare Performance
Contact:
Davida Leayman
Allentown, PA 18101
Ph: 484-862-3067
Davida_M.Leayman@lvhn.org
This elective is designed to develop students' communication skills in physician-patient encounters through embodied learning. Under the supervision of the course director (PhD in Performance & Health Communication), students will develop skills writing, assessing, and engaging in staged interactive patient encounters with actors from the LVHN Simulation Center and local Allentown community theatre. This elective will provide students the opportunity to develop effective communication skills (e.g., empathic listening) and cultural competency in a supportive and safe learning environment.
Objectives:
  1. Collect a patient narrative and transcribe it as a short script/play to be performed by local actors.
  2. Understand the unique physical, emotional, and cultural needs of patients by watching/audiencing local actors perform narratives collected by students from the course.
  3. Increase cultural competency by exposing students to patient narratives from diversified cultural backgrounds.
  4. Increase interpersonal communication skills such as effective listening and reading nonverbals by interacting with patients (when collecting narratives) and actors (when role-playing patient encounters).
  5. Learn clinical empathy skills (e.g., empathic listening). Understand emotional biases and emotional responses in different patient encounters.
  6. Improve verbal and nonverbal behaviors during patient encounters by engaging in staged patient performances with trained medical actors. 
  7. Evaluate staged performances to identify verbal and nonverbal changes needed to improve patient care.
The student will meet with at least one patient to collect his/her narrative. Students will participate in "practice" interactive staged performances of patient narratives to receive formative feedback from the course director and fellow classmates. Students will have an opportunity to perform in both patient and physician roles during practice encounters. At the end of the course, students will engage in a final, staged "performance" (similar to an OSCE) of their collected patient narrative with a trained, medical actor from a  local institution. Students will also self-assess their encounter with the patient/actor and offer written feedback of classmates' staged encounters. Upon completion of the course, students will have an increased understanding of various communication skills used in diverse patient encounters and how to apply those skills to improve cultural competency, mutual understanding, empathy, and patient-centered care. 
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the completion of the course based on collected and transcribed patient narratives in the form of a short "script". During the patient encounters, students will be assessed by the course director based on ACGME competencies: communication skills (e.g., listening) and how well these skills were applied during the practice encounters and final encounter. A written checklist and narrative evaluation will be used during the course as both formative feedback (practice patient encounters) and summative feedback (final, staged patient encounter). Students will also be graded on the written and verbal feedback they provide their classmates during their practice and final encounter. Grades are determined by 30% written patient narrative, 40% staged patient encounter, 15% self assessment of patient encounter, 15% feedback of classmates' patient encounters. 
LVHN
 4 - 11
Yr 4 Status
6
0
40
2,4
Defenbaugh, Nicole
 
Interdept
 
 MDE 8048 Narrative Medicine
Contact:
Davida Leayman
Allentown, PA 18101
Ph: 484-862-3067
Davida_M.Leayman@lvhn.org
This elective will introduce medical students to narrative skills in clinical practice and to the power and influence of stories in patient-centered care. Students will develop and practice skills in the three main areas of narrative competence (attention, representation, and affiliation), learn to integrate these narrative skills into clinical settings both diagnostically and therapeutically, and strengthen their ability to perceive and to communicate complex information effectively and persuasively. Students will participate in seminars that focus on critical and close reading of narrative texts, discussion of the multidisciplinary theories informing narrative medicine, skill development workshops on collecting narratives, and direct clinical work with patients collecting, writing and analyzing narratives. 
Objectives:
  1. Recognize the social, cultural, familial/communal, political and personal significance of illness narratives.
  2. Develop narrative competence ("the ability to recognize, absorb, interpret, and be moved by the stories of illness") by practicing the core narrative clinical skills of attention, representation, and affiliation.  
  3. Identify and develop leadership skills that enable students to listen to and learn from stories, and act to bring about change in supportive ways. 
  4. Identify key elements of narrative by conducting close readings of mulitple narratives from different sources and in different venues (text, interview, etc).
  5. Expand interpersonal communication skills, capacity for actionable empathy, cultural competence and moral agency through exposure to narrative and participation in narrative exercises.
  6. Demonstrate how to collect, analyze, write and present a medical narrative.  
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director and faculty member at the completion of the course. Oral and written narratives (patient & self) will be evaluated for depth of understanding and applying course concepts, basic presentation skills, and ability to show a connection to social, cultural, and political contexts. Questions to course readings will be evaluated on level of reflection and incorporation of course concepts and terms. Grades are determined by: 50% graded write up, 25% oral presentation, 25% responses to course readings. If prior approval for patient narrative is not granted, alternate collection of patient narrative must be approved by course director.   
LVHN
 9
Yr 4 Status
6
0
40
2,4
Bresnan, Kristin
 
Interdept
 
 MDE 8080 Clinical Informatics
Contact:
Paige Roth
Paige.Roth@lvhn.org
NOTE: Any interested student must meet with Drs. Levick or Peifer to discuss goals of the elective and determine if appropriate, and the expected length of the elective. This must occur at least 3 months prior to start of elective.
 This elective will be an introduction to Clinical Informatics. The elective will include a combination of didactic lectures (both real-time and on-line) covering basics of Clinical Informatics, shadowing experiences with appropriate clinical technical staff (based on the students’ rotation goals), and individualized project work. Examples of projects may include: participating in ongoing research projects for potential publication/presentation; work on data warehouse projects and business intelligence tools (dashboards, etc.); development of EHR templates/workflows; participation in development/rollout of clinical information systems (including HIE and Epic systems); evaluation of new clinical information devices and technologies. The student activities will be coordinated through the CMIO (or his/her designee).
Objectives:
  1. State and understand how the discipline of clinical informatics intersects with and influences the three domains of clinical care, local and national healthcare systems, and information and communications technologies
  2. Understand the role of informatics in population health and value-based care
  3. Describe the various roles of a clinical informatician in the healthcare setting
  4. Recognize the specific tasks involved in the design, implementation and support of clinical information systems
  5. Assess the clinical content of CIS and apply change management techniques to develop evidence based improvements
  6. Participate in simple projects with faculty mentors in health informatics, optimization of electronic health record systems, using data analysis techniques for research/quality improvement. 
  7. Recognize database structures and translate data into useful business intelligence tools.
Evaluation:
Evaluation will consist of ongoing appraisal of the student’s ability to assimilate the knowledge presented (both through didactic and practical channels) and apply it to the projects and tasks as assigned. Specific project related deliverables will be determined at the beginning of the rotation; and assessment of those deliverables will be used in the evaluation.   
LVH-CC
 1, 2B, 3 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40
2
Peifer, Maryanne
 
Interdept
 Education
 MDE 8090 Doctoring IV: Theory/Teaching
This elective will introduce senior students to the practice and theory of adult education. They will attend seminars that introduce them to education pedagogy and effective teaching technique.They will also teach for a minimum of 90 hours in the College of Medicine co-facilitating Doctoring 1, 2, and 3 small groups, or the CACL experience, with senior faculty, and  They will reflect and write on their teaching experience, and receive feedback from students, course faculty, and the elective director about their teaching performance. The course is longitudinal, so teaching activities will occur throughout the senior year, tailored to students' individual schedules.
Objectives:
  1. Demonstrate the practice of good clinical and small group medical school teaching
  2. Apply the theory of adult education to their small group teaching
  3. Reflect on teaching experiences in written and verbal media
  4. Deliver effective feedback to students and peers
Evaluation:
By the end of the elective, students should feel competent to teach in both small group and clinical teaching settings. They will understand how to give feedback to individuals. Their progress will be assessed by review of student teaching evaluations, observation of COM course leaders, and direct observation by the elective director.


All interested students must meet with the course director and obtain approval before registration. Students must agree to hours requirements and need to inform concurrent senior course directors of their involvement in this longitudinal course.
USFMS
Yearlong
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
4
44
DeWaay, Deborah
 
Interdept
 Education
 MDE 8094 Teaching in Simulation
Any interested student MUST meet with  Amy Smith, PhD to discuss individual goals for applying for a simulation in healthcare elective.
This elective is designed to introduce students to the art and science of simulation in healthcare and how to utilize simulation to teach effectively.  The course will include didactic and experiential learning. Under the guidance of the LVHN interdisciplinary Simulation Center, students will have the opportunity to observe simulations, assist with developing curriculum as it pertains to simulation, design and develop cases to meet course objectives and implement a simulation.
Objectives:
  1. Describe principles of adult learning and experiential learning theories.
  2. Describe key concepts of teaching with simulation and how to incorporate simulation into curriculum. 
  3. Compare teaching with simulation versus assessing with simulation.
  4. Describe the various types of simulation modalities and how to choose the modality to best meet course need.
  5. Review simulation curriculum from a student perspective and design.
  6. Design and develop an interprofessional simulation course including simulation cases, SP scripts, and an effective evaluation tool.
  7. Discuss effective debriefing and apply techniques to practice cases.
  8. Discuss the effective use of video debriefing.
  9. Discuss using standardized patients when building simulations and how to utilize the standardize patient for evaluations.
  10. Discuss utilizing moulage to add realism to simulation.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course based on professionalism, reflections, and a final project.  The simulation staff and faculty will provide formative and summative evaluations throughout the course.
LVHN
 1 -11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40
4
Smith, Amy
 
Interdept
 
 MDE 8523 Dental Medicine
This is a two-week rotation split between the LVH-17th Street site in Allentown, and the LVH-Muhlenberg site in Bethlehem. Both sites support an outpatient dental clinic with a total of seven dental residents. This experience will give the student insight into understanding the systemic complications of dental disease and treatment.
Students will observe dental therapy in the outpatient dental clinics, particularly on patients who need special care due to complex medical conditions. Students may be able to participate in providing direct patient care. Part of the hands-on experience may include administration of local anesthetics and non- complicated extraction of teeth under the direct supervision of our Attending dentists. The clinical experience may also include differential diagnosis of intra-oral lesions, early detection of oral cancers, recognition of oral lesions due to the systemic administration of medications, malocclusions, oro-facial pain and temporo-mandibular joint dysfunctions.
The student will participate with the dental residents responding to inpatient consult requests from other departments. Students will learn when it is appropriate to consult with a dentist and how to respond to medical consult requests from dentists.  Students will also respond to emergency call to the Emergency Rooms along with the resident after regular clinic hours. 
In addition, the student will attend seminars on various dentally-related topics along with the dental residents.  If scheduled during the rotation, students will observe dental treatment in the Operating Room as well as IV sedation cases. 
Objectives:
  1. Examine what hospital-based post-doctoral dental programs consist of. 
  2. Increase knowledge of head and neck anatomy and pathology as well as understand the ramifications of systemic disease for dental treatment.
  3. Describe the role that dental health plays in overall patient wellness.
  4. Experience the provision of some simple procedures that could be used when engaging in future medical practices, such as administration of local anesthetics and/or simple dental extractions. 
  5. Analyze the relationship between oral and systemic diseases and be able to identify how systemic disease affects oral health.
Evaluation:
The attending who is present each clinic session who will provide a written evaluation to the program co-directors.  A summary of all evaluations will be presented to the student at the end of the rotation.  Evaluations will be based on:
Level of Engagement
Professional Conduct
Patient Management and Rapport
Attendance at all assigned lectures
Attendance for all on-call responsibilities
LVH-CC
5-6, 8-11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40
2
Incalcaterra, Charles
Clinical
Interdept
 
 MDE 8581 Inpatient Physical Med and Rehab
Contact:
Leigh-Anne Piechta, DO
Leigh-Anne_B.Piechta@lvhn.org
This elective is designed to introduce senior student to the practice of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation in the inpatient, outpatient and consultative environment. Under the supervision of clinical faculty students will have the opportunity to see the continuum of care that physiatrists provide.
Objectives:
  1. Observe how patients on acute care are evaluated and how determinations about disposition are made.
  2. Follow a patient through admission on the inpatient acute rehabilitation unit. Monitor their progress. Participate in team meetings and understand interdisciplinary approach to patient management.
  3. Become familiar with reading notes written by physical, occupational and speech therapists.
  4. Learn how determinations of dispositions upon discharge from acute inpatient rehabilitation are made.
  5. See the spectrum of patients seen in the outpatient setting.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by course director at the end of the course. The grade will be based on evaluations of the faculty who worked with them.
LVH-CC
  1 -11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40
2,4
Piechta, Leigh-Anne
Clinical
Interdept
 
 MDE 8714 Intro to Medical Toxicology
Contact:
Rachael Matthews
Ph: 813-844-7044
Dr. Tamas Peredy
tperedy@health.usf.edu or tperedy@tgh.org
Report to:
One Davis Blvd, Suite 203 (Second Floor) at 9 am on the first weekday of the rotation
Medical Toxicology is best described broadly as the field of medicine with expertise in the health effects caused by pharmaceuticals, occupational exposures and environmental agents. Toxicologists assist in the management of medication overdoses, addiction and withdrawal states, envenomations, hazardous materials exposures and workplace hazards. Toxicologists oversee the clinical operations of a Poison Center.
Objectives:
  1. Become familiar with fundamental concepts underpinning the clinical management of Toxicological patients. Participation in the diagnosis and treatment of selected acute and chronic exposures in adults and children is expected. Elements of competency include reliable history-taking, physical examination aimed at the detection of toxidromes, formulation of differential diagnoses, implementation of treatment, and development of safe disposition plans.
  2. Understand the principles, methods and controversies related to limiting toxic exposures by decontamination including gastric lavage, activated charcoal administration, renal replacement therapy, ion trapping, and hyperbaric oxygen.
  3. Review knowledge of basic kinetic principles of drug absorption, redistribution, metabolism, and elimination.
  4. Study poisoning epidemiology specifically within populations ‘at risk’ such as toddlers, the elderly, pregnant or nursing women, migrants and immigrants.
  5. Complete case studies from approximately 20 classes of drugs and poisons commonly encountered in clinical practice.  Emphasis will be placed on assessing severity and initiating timely, appropriate treatment.
  6. Learn guiding principles of the management of acute intoxication in the Emergency Department.  Commonly abused drugs for specific socioeconomic groups will be reviewed. Withdrawal states will also be discussed.
  7. Become familiar with selected antidotes, their uses, doses, side effects and limitations.
  8. Develop awareness for important agents of toxinology (naturally occurring toxins). These include plants and animals toxins, especially focusing on native venomous arthropods, reptiles and marine creatures.
  9. Understand diagnostic toxicology laboratory techniques, limitations and costs of both qualitative and quantitative analyses.
  10. Observe the clinical operation of a Poison Center. Understand the public health role of the Poison Centers in gathering and disseminating data including protected health information (PHI).
Activities:
  1. A mandatory orientation is to be attended by the student in the first few days of the rotation.
  2. Observation and participation in telephone consultations at the Florida Poison Information – Tampa is expected. Students will review cases referred for medical treatment and other cases of interest.
  3. A series of standard cases accompanies independent reading assignments. Expect about 20-24 hours of small group discussion.
  4. Attendance at a variety of teaching rounds and meetings will be required.
  5. Participation in inpatient consultations is expected. Volumes of patients are variable month to month. Students should keep a record of all patients encountered.
  6. Students will be expected to prepare two 10 minute presentations on a pre-approved topic of their choice to be shared with toxicology rotators and poison center staff. It should be of narrow scope and of sufficient quality to be included in the rotators teaching files for future students to use.
  7. Guided tours of the toxicology laboratory and other field trips (e.g. Lowry Park Zoo) may be available.
  8.  The opportunity to conduct clinical or laboratory research, construct toxicology teaching materials, or to write a review paper for publication is encouraged and is available by arrangement in advance of the rotation.
Evaluation:
  1. Case study preparation will be assessed during discussions with the medical toxicologist.
  2. Attendance at conferences and assigned poison center shifts will be counted in the evaluation.
  3. A written test is not administered at the end of the month.
  4. For special arrangements involving research, writing or teaching, quality and completion of the project will contribute to the grade.
  5. Input on professionalism and participation will be solicited from the Poison Center staff.
TGH
 1-3a,4,5-11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40
2,4
Peredy, Tamas
Clinical
Interdept
 
 MDE 8714 Intro to Medical Toxicology
Contact:
Dawn Yenser
Ph: 848-884-2888
Dawn.Yenser@lvhn.org
Medical Toxicology is best described broadly as the field of medicine with expertise in the health effects caused by pharmaceuticals, occupational exposures and environmental agents. Toxicologists assist in the management of medication overdoses, addiction and withdrawal states, envenomations, hazardous materials exposures and workplace hazards. Toxicologists oversee the clinical operations of a Poison Center.
Objectives:
  1. Become familiar with fundamental concepts underpinning the clinical management of Toxicological patients. Participation in the diagnosis and treatment of selected acute and chronic exposures in adults and children is expected. Elements of competency include reliable history-taking, physical examination aimed at the detection of toxidromes, formulation of differential diagnoses, implementation of treatment, and development of safe disposition plans.
  2. Understand the principles, methods and controversies related to limiting toxic exposures by decontamination including gastric lavage, activated charcoal administration, renal replacement therapy, ion trapping, and hyperbaric oxygen.
  3. Review knowledge of basic kinetic principles of drug absorption, redistribution, metabolism, and elimination.
  4. Study poisoning epidemiology specifically within populations ‘at risk’ such as toddlers, the elderly, pregnant or nursing women, migrants and immigrants.
  5. Complete case studies from approximately 20 classes of drugs and poisons commonly encountered in clinical practice.  Emphasis will be placed on assessing severity and initiating timely, appropriate treatment.
  6. Learn guiding principles of the management of acute intoxication in the Emergency Department.  Commonly abused drugs for specific socioeconomic groups will be reviewed. Withdrawal states will also be discussed.
  7. Become familiar with selected antidotes, their uses, doses, side effects and limitations.
  8. Develop awareness for important agents of toxinology (naturally occurring toxins). These include plants and animals toxins, especially focusing on native venomous arthropods, reptiles and marine creatures.
  9. Understand diagnostic toxicology laboratory techniques, limitations and costs of both qualitative and quantitative analyses.
  10. Observe the clinical operation of a Poison Center. Understand the public health role of the Poison Centers in gathering and disseminating data including protected health information (PHI).
Activities:
  1. A mandatory orientation is to be attended by the student in the first few days of the rotation.
  2. Observation and participation in telephone consultations is expected. Students will review cases referred for medical treatment and other cases of interest.
  3. A series of standard cases accompanies independent reading assignments. Expect about 20-24 hours of small group discussion.
  4. Attendance at a variety of teaching rounds and meetings will be required.
  5. Participation in inpatient consultations is expected. Volumes of patients are variable month to month. Students should keep a record of all patients encountered.
  6. Students will be expected to prepare two 10 minute presentations on a pre-approved topic of their choice to be shared with toxicology rotators and poison center staff. It should be of narrow scope and of sufficient quality to be included in the rotators teaching files for future students to use.
  7. Guided tours of the toxicology laboratory and other field trips may be available.
  8. The opportunity to conduct clinical or laboratory research, construct toxicology teaching materials, or to write a review paper for publication is encouraged and is available by arrangement in advance of the rotation.
Evaluation:
  1. Case study preparation will be assessed during discussions with the medical toxicologist.
  2. Attendance at conferences and assigned poison center shifts will be counted in the evaluation.
  3. A written test is not administered at the end of the month.
  4. For special arrangements involving research, writing or teaching, quality and completion of the project will contribute to the grade.
  5. Input on professionalism and participation will be solicited from the Poison Center staff.
LVHN
 2 - 5, 7 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40
4
Cook, Matthew
Clinical
Interdept
 
 MDE 8920 SELECT 4
SELECT 4 will occur throughout the year and will consist of two formal teaching blocks called Prologue at the beginning of Year 4 and  Epilogue near the end of the year. There will also be longitudinal component throughout the year.  The duration of Prologue  and the Epilogue will total three weeks.  The one-week longitudinal portion includes 1:1 coaching between students and their respective faculty coaches, peer coaching, small group meetings, and formative and summative assessments of students' clinical skills. This longitudinal portion can be taken concurrently with other electives. Students will be given four-weeks of credit for the course. Required learning assignments include IHI web-based modules and three domain-associated activities with their concomitant written reflections.

Objectives:
  1. Facilitate students' identification of strengths and specific areas for leadership and professional development
  2. Describe responsibilities and roles of medical students and physicians as leaders and change agents in medical education and in the evolving healthcare environment.
  3. Gather formative and summative assessments of students' clinical skills that incorporate SELECT competencies.
Evaluation:
At the end of the course, students will be expected to:
  1. Have enhanced self-awareness, self-management, social awareness and relationship building
  2. Acquire and become skilled at the use of reflection and other life-long learning and assessment methods that can be used to further develop emotional intelligence post-medical school
  3. Demonstrate further skilled interactions with patients, their families, and other healthcare professionals in challenging clinical situations through standardized patient encounters and other learning and assessment modalities
  4. Demonstrate knowledge and skills in health systems, processes related to optimizing patient care and outcomes
LVHN
 1A, 10B
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
40
2
Rosenau, Alex
 SELECT
Interdept
 
 MDE 8942 Clinical Enrichment Elective
Any student who wishes to complete this elective will need to meet with either Dr. Vinita Kiluk or Dawn Schocken to confirm elective availability and so that they can match student needs to the available resources.

Faculty will work with each student to design a curriculum to develop advanced proficiency in the various clinical competencies based on self-reflection of the student and the assessment of the faculty. The elective is tailored to the need of the individual student. Faculty will specifically identify, and use simulated learning,  real clinical settings, study aides, and professional expertise to allow students to work on competency based clinical skills.


Objectives:

At the end of this elective the student will (depending on the initial goals of the students from the course):
  1. Demonstrate proficiency with presentations based upon a validated assessment tool  
  2. Discuss the process to efficiently conduct a chart review
  3. Display confidence and assertiveness when developing a management plan for the patients with whom the student is involved
  4. Analyze their improvements in their communication skills
  5. Document an improvement in the flow of their history taking
  6. Document an improvement in the flow of their physical exam.
Methods:
Students will participate in this elective in the CACL and CACL II, seeing standardized patients, observing videos, participating in simulation activities and developing experience in electronic charting.  Occasionally students will practice in the clinical outpatient setting. 
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated using checklists to provide a 360 review of their performance - the student will complete self-checklists, SPs will complete a review of the student's performance of communications skills, and the elective faculty will complete checklists on student performance.  A queue of faculty not in this elective will be trained by the elective faculty to review video-taped performances of the student to document proficiency in areas under contract.  Grades will be determined from the combination of self-checklists and faculty checklists as well as a final self-assessment by the student on what they have accomplished during the elective and what they plan to continue to work on as life long learners.
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
No Limit
0
40
2,4
Kiluk, Vinita
Clinical
Interdept
 
 MDE 8950 SELECT Capstone
This is a required course for all SELECT students. It will consist of a customized project or experience that results in a scholarly product. This course will support the educational development of the SELECT medical students by providing an opportunity for in-depth learning in one of the domains of the SELECT program. Students will be given the equivalent of four-weeks of credit for this course. It may be taken longitudinally or as a 4 week block. Students must be enrolled by day one of their fourth year.
Objectives:
The overriding goal of this course is to provide an academic opportunity for students to explore a SELECT competency that is both interesting to them and critical to their future practice of medicine.  The specific objectives are  to:
  1. Further develop self-directed learning, evaluative and critical reasoning skills
  2. Integrate an in-depth understanding of one or more SELECT domains into medical care
  3. Create a scholarly legacy for our academic, medical and/or general communities
Evaluation:
At the end of this course, students will be expected to have an in-depth knowledge and expertise in an areas of leadership, patient centered care, or health systems and health policy.
LVHN
Yearlong
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
4
44
Kane, Bryan
 SELECT
Interdept
 
 MEL 7267S International Health SELECT
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS

Due to the grant funding of this course, it is only available to students in the SELECT program. 
This elective has been designed to provide students opportunities to further explore the SELECT competencies of Leadership, Health Systems and Values-Based Patient-Centered Care at the Institute of Indian Mother and Child (IIMC) in Kolkata, India.  IIMC is a non-governmental voluntary organization, committed to promoting child & maternal health, literacy and also aims at accelerating international solidarity and peace.  IIMC was founded to give support to the medical needs of the poorest people of West Bengal, India; people who have no access to basic healthcare and medical facilities. Today, IIMC has expanded its activities to include Medical Programs, Health Education & Health Promotion Programs, Network Programs, Education & Sponsorship Programs, and integrated rural developmental projects including women’s economic empowerment through Micro Finance Banking Programs and agricultural programs.
Students will be exposed to health care disparities at an international level through immersion in a different and unique culture and health care system. They will collaborate with local health care professionals and will work alongside of other medical students from different countries, such as Finland, Italy, Spain, New Zealand and Australia.  The students will work in the outpatient clinics, in the wards and will simultaneously participate in the community programs such as Women's Peace Council, children's nutrition and educational sponsorship programs. They will accompany the local health care professionals to remote villages and provide outpatient care in these remote clinics. This will provide them the unique opportunity to firsthand experience the health care and social disparities and they will be able to reflect on their experiences. They will also have the opportunity to develop a practice or system improvement project based on individual interest and experience (with a focus on the SELECT competencies).
 Objectives:
  1. Expose students to a different culture and health care system in a developing country
  2. Experience team work through collaboration with  students from different countries and with the local health care professionals all working towards the same goals (Team Effectiveness and Communication)
  3. Compare and contrast the health care systems in India and USA (Health Systems and Health Disparities)
  4. Identify the general needs of the local population through an immersion experience (Population centered experience)
Students will be required to complete pre-work for the elective which will include readings, discussions on common health issues they will encounter, and a thorough review of the IIMC website. During the elective, the students will keep a journal and submit weekly reflections on the experience.  At the end of the elective students will be required to provide a report on their individual practice or system improvement project and also a summary of their entries into their journaling.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course based on their pre-work, reflections, and final report of the individual project.  Students will also be asked to complete a satisfaction survey of the experience and how they will use what they learned from the experience.
Course Requirements:
Students must apply and will have to appear at an interview in Year 3. A maximum of 3 students will be selected each year to take this elective in the month of February. The interviews will be scheduled in the summer of their Year 3.
Any interested student MUST submit their application by June of their third year. They will then meet with Dr. Jain to discuss individual goals for applying for an elective in international health.
Emergency medical insurance is required for all electives abroad.
All necessary paperwork needs to be completed as required. Students selected for this elective will be required to communicate promptly as needed. Cultural humility and effective communication are the cornerstones of success of this elective.
EXT
9
Yr 4 Status
3
0
4
40
Jain, Sweety
Clinical
Interdept
 
 MEL 8132 Outdoor Medicine Elective
This senior medical student elective is intended to teach the practical and theoretical medical skills necessary to identify, treat and prevent medical problems unique to the outdoor environment. The course is directed towards the outdoor or travel enthusiast who may find themselves in situations outside of the traditional clinical setting where they may be called upon to provide medical assistance. There will also be ample opportunities for students to present outdoor medicine topics to peers and junior medical students. 

This is a year long elective from April through May.  Activities are usually held on Saturdays, but may be held on weekday evenings, during lunch meetings, and some overnight activities. There will be a required 120 hours of attendance at activities and there will be at least 160 hours available to attend to accommodate senior students on externships. The culmination of the course is the Annual Outdoor Medicine Conference usually held during the last month of the academic year in the Florida Keys (students are encouraged register for an interview block (MEL INT) this month). There may be other activities that require travel to places such as Great Smoky Mountains National Park, Everglades National Park, or other distant locations. Students should also budget at least $250 for admission fees and equipment rental throughout the year and approximately $500 for the Annual Florida Outdoor Medicine Conference. 

Examples of Activities: 
  • "No Lifeguard on Duty" held at Ben T. Davis Beach and learned about Basic Water Rescue and Submersion Incidents. 
  • “Hillsborough River Half Marathon” providing First Aid to race participants
  • "A 3-Hour Tour" held on an island in the Tampa Bay and learned about Seafood Toxidromes while catching Pufferfish.
Objectives:
  1. Practice medical skills to be used in situations outside of the hospital setting
  2. Gain knowledge of medical conditions related to various outdoor environments and activities
  3. Develop understanding of emergency and disaster response systems
  4. Increase students' ability to present medical information to peers 
  5. Gain practical outdoor recreational skills and exposure to local resources
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course. Students will be evaluated based on attendance and participation of course meetings (50%) as well as assigned outdoor medicine topic presentations (50%). Students will be required to attend 120 hours of meetings/activities over the 11 month period. There will be opportunities for at least 160 hours of meetings/activities. Students may expect to be given specific topics or scenarios to present at each meeting they plan to attend. Presentations will be evaluated by course directors and contribute to the presentation portion of the final grade.
USFMS
Yearlong
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
4
44
Marcet, Jorge
 
Interdept
 
 MEL 8149 Int'l Medical Spanish/Culture
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
This elective is designed to provide USF Medical Students an opportunity to participate in an established international Medical Spanish program. Participation in these programs will allow students to learn and/or improve conversational Medical Spanish and to experience the culture of a Spanish speaking country. It is expected that this experience will allow students to appropriately interact in a clinical setting with Spanish speaking patients abroad and in the USA. It is expected that this experience will increase the student’s functional language skills in real cultural, clinical and medical environments. Depending on the program, students will normally have scheduled class hours to learn basic and intermediate Spanish skills as well as time to interact with the local community. During the 4 week elective, students will be exposed to various clinical scenarios and have an opportunity to experience local customs as well as visit local settings. Students wishing to participate will be required to fund their tuition, transportation, meals and other necessary items.

Interested students should sign up no later than 6 months prior to the course. Students should also plan to schedule a meeting with Drs. Callegari or Gonzalez to review the requirements no later than 6 months prior to the course.
Objectives
  1. Students will be able to establish communication in Spanish to the degree of:
    1. Understanding a patient’s needs for seeking health care and obtaining their reason for the encounter (chief compliant)
    2. Conducting basic medical interviews and being able to characterize the signs and symptoms of the patient
    3. Being able to communicate requests when performing a general physical examination 
  2. Students will understand the differences between various clinical settings in the country visited and compare them with the USA facilities and health system.
  3. Students will compare medical problems and health needs from local population with the Hispanic and non Hispanic USA population.
  4. Students will understand and be sensitive to local, family, and cultural values and be able to compare them to the USA Hispanic and non-Hispanic population.
Evaluation
The learner’s evaluation will be based on:
  • Performance obtaining a clinical medical history in Spanish which may be conducted in an OSCE format before and after the experience.
  • A written report on the learner’s experience
  • Informal presentation to the directors on their experience as it relates to the cultural and medical Spanish aspects of the course
Emergency medical insurance is required for all electives abroad.
EXT
 1 - 9
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
40
4
Callegari, Carlos
 
Interdept
 
 MEL 8939 Clinical Science Review
The Clinical Science Review course is a variable contact hour multi-disciplinary course for medical students. This comprehensive course will consist of an assessment of clinical gaps, an in-depth clinical review and clinical practice in simulated and real world settings. It will include basic science review if deemed appropriate. This course is for remedial work or for students returning to the clinical portion of the curriculum after an extended absence only.
Areas of Study:
Adult Medicine Clerkship
Maternal Newborn Pediatrics Clerkship or Women's Health and Peds Clerkship
Psychiatry and Neurology Clerkship
Primary Care Clerkship
Surgical Care Clerkship
Additional areas determined as necessary by the faculty.

The course objective is to enhance clinical skills in any of the listed Clinical Sciences.
USFMS
 1 - 12
Prior Approval, Remedial Course
TBD
0
40
4
Faculty
 
Interdept
 Education
 MEL 8954 Becoming the Physician Educator
Please submit a brief email to one of the faculty prior to signing up for this elective indicating any specific block you would like to work in, and why.  Included in this email, describe your personal goals that you hope to achieve during this elective. Registration requires permission of the course director(s).

VInita Kiluk: vkiluk@health.usf.edu
Dawn Schocken: dschock1@health.usf.edu

This elective is designed to introduce senior medical students to the role of the physician educator, a clinical faculty member, who intentionally teaches the “why” of medicine. Students will work with the MCOM faculty to design active learning sessions, case study materials, and interdisciplinary labs.  Students will also learn the essentials of teaching in interprofessional educational sessions, at the bedside as well as in large and small groups. 
Objectives:
At the end of this elective the student will be able to:
  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the role of an academic physician in the pre-clerkship curriculum.  
  2. Analyze how to integrate basic science teaching in the clinical setting. 
  3. Examine and demonstrate the concepts of bedside teaching.
  4. Compare effective teaching methods/strategies, feedback/evaluation strategies, and approaches to dealing with difficult learners.
  5. Create a session incorporating measurable goals and objectives for a course.
  6. Demonstrate an understanding of collaboration with pre-clerkship faculty to teach MS1 and MS2 students effectively in small group, and large group active learning settings.
  7. Deliver an effective basic science lecture, which integrates active learning principles into the sessions.
Learning Outcomes:
By the end of this elective, the student will have a better understanding of the basic principles of teaching and be able to demonstrate effective teaching techniques.
Evaluation:
  • Active participation in teaching seminars
  • Active collaboration with instructors to develop teaching materials.
  • Delivery of a well-researched lecture and well-researched small group session.
USFMS
10
Yr 4 Status
10
0
40
4
Kiluk, Vinita
 
Interdept
 
Interview Month
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
No Limit
0
0
2,4
 
 
Molec Med
 
 BMS 7260 Research in Molecular Med
The student will undertake a specific research project in collaboration with one of the faculty and will participate in research conferences and seminars. Current research areas include studies of the molecular basis for various disease states, such as cardiovascular disease, infectious disease, neurodegenerative disease; molecular virology; host-parasite interactions; molecular immunology; metabolic regulation; and molecular and cellular biology.
Objective:
The objective of this course is to introduce the student to modern methods and concepts of biomedical research.
Evaluation:
Evaluation of the student will be based on the mastery of a set of research techniques, the utilization of these to investigate a re¬search problem and the collection, evaluation, and interpretation of these experimental findings.
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
4
0
44
2,4
Faculty
Research
Molec Med
 
Indep Study-Molecular Med
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
No Limit
0
44
2,4
Faculty
Indep Study
Molec Pharm Physio
 Pharm
 BMS 7464 Research in Pharmacology
Objective:
The primary objective of this course is to introduce the student to the research environment. The focus is directed to current research techniques, including methods of data acquisition and analysis, and critical reading of the literature pertinent to the research problem. The student will work as part of the research team on one of the projects currently underway in the department as determined by the student's interest and the concurrence of the faculty. Enrollment, dates, and duration of the course are by arrangement.

Approval, dates, and duration of course must be arranged with a faculty mentor prior to registering.
Evaluation:
Evaluation will be based on a short paper or oral exam to be determined by arrangement with the instructor.
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
4
0
44
2,4
Faculty
Research
Molec Pharm Physio
Pharm
MEL 9999D Indep Study - Pharmacology
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
No Limit
0
44
2,4
Faculty
Indep Study
Molec Pharm Physio
 Physio
 BMS 7560 Research in Physiology
Objective:
The primary objective of this course is to introduce the student to the research environment. The student will learn current research techniques and the methods of data collection and reduction. The student will be expected to take an active part in the problem solving aspects of research including in depth reading of the literature pertinent to the research project and participation in conferences and seminars. The student will work as part of the research team on one of the projects current in the department. 


Approval, dates, and duration of course must be arranged with a faculty mentor prior to registering.
Evaluation:
A written report will be required.
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
4
0
44
2,4
Faculty
Research
Molec Pharm Physio
Physio
MEL 9999H Indep Study - Pharmacology
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
No Limit
0
44
2,4
Faculty
Indep Study
Neurology
 
 MDT 8800 Neuroimmuno in Neuro Disease
This course is designed to demonstrate that most of the neurological diseases have an immune/inflammatory component, and the list of neurologic diseases in which the immune system plays an important role continues to grow. Because of the critical correlation between the nervous system and immune system, neurologists should be aware of neuroimmunologic principles especially as immunologic therapeutic strategies are currently being tested in many neurologic disorders. The course will be a balance between basic science and clinical activities and include seminars, journal clubs, clinical correlation and paper presentations by the students selected from the ‘List of Major Topics’.
Major Topics:
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis (ADEM)
  • Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO)
  • Myasthenia Gravis
  • Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (Gullian-Barre syndrome)
  • Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP)
  • Epilepsy (Mesial Temporal Sclerosis, see also paraneoplastic syndromes such as Anti-Voltage-Gated Potassium and anti-NMDA receptor antibody syndromes)
  • Movement Disorders (Hashimoto’s encephalopathy, Parkinson’s Disease)
  • Alzheimer Dementia
  • AIDS Dementia 
  • CNS Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome (IRIS)
  • CNS infections e.g., meningo-encephalitis
  • Cerebrovascuar Disease (e.g. Stroke, CNS Vasculitis)
  • Primary CNS tumors
  • Paraneoplastic Syndromes
  • Prion Diseases (Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease)
  • Autism

Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated based on punctuality of assignments, presentations, interactions with patients and staff, discussions, and a final product (oral or written presentation).
USFMS
 10B, 11A
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40-60
2
Wiranowska, Marzenna
Basic Science 
Neurology
 
 MEL 8359 Intro to Physical Med and Rehab
The Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation/Physiatry elective is intended to allow students the opportunity to develop and refine musculoskeletal history and physical examination skills, competence in the understanding and evaluation of various musculoskeletal disorders, especially spinal disorders, diagnostic testing, medication prescription, and exposure to radiologic interpretation under the supervision of a board-certified physiatrist or certified nurse practitioner.  In addition, the student will be given exposure to the variety of physiatric diagnostic and treatment options, including but not limited to fluoroscopically guided interventional procedures and electrodiagnostic testing (EMGs). 

Students will participate in the outpatient physiatry clinics at the LVHN Cedar Crest and Muhlenberg campuses. 
Students will follow the schedule created for the attendings and nurse practitioner with whom they work.  They will have an opportunity to customize a unique schedule to provide exposure to areas of interest

Care is provided at LVHN Cedar Crest and Muhlenberg locations treating patients from early adulthood to geriatric ages.  The racial and ethnic distribution reflects the diversity within the Lehigh Valley.  When English is not the primary spoken language, interpretation services are available to assist in the patient care setting, either through direct interview or via a remote language line service.

Students are expected to observe, perform selected history and physical evaluations, and learn about certain procedures appropriate for the physiatry setting.  All such procedures will be under the direct supervision of the attending physician.
Evaluation:
Educational objectives will be provided. Evaluation will be based on attendance and demonstration that the educational objectives have been met.
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
44
2,4
Radecki, Jeffrey
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8359 Intro to Physical Med & Rehab
This elective will provide the medical student with a broad and comprehensive educational experience in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. There will be instruction in the evaluation and rehabilitation of a wide range of medical disability conditions including musculoskeletal problems, head injuries, spinal cord injuries, strokes, amputees, chronic pain, geriatrics, and cardiac rehabilitation. In addition, students will be exposed to physical, occupational, speech, audiology, vocational, recreational, and kinesiological therapies. There will be instruction in functional assessments of all types of physical disabilities and in the diagnostic use of electromyography for muscle and neurological disorders. Overall, the educational experience will offer a practical approach to those patients with disabilities. This will benefit all medical students regardless of their primary area of interest. Visitation at other rehabilitation centers is available.
Evaluation:
Educational objectives, a learning booklet, and expected learning outcomes with a bibliography will be provided. Evaluation will be based on attendance and demonstration that the educational objectives have been met. An honors grade requires the student to do a case presentation at a weekly conference.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
None
2
0
40
2,4
Latlief, Gail
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8671 Elect in Inpatient Gen Neuro
Prior approval of Dr. Varrato is required before scheduling this elective.
The elective is under the supervision of a Neurology attending. Students become an integral part of a team that cares for patients with various neurological diseases. There are opportunities for participating in research projects.
Objectives:
  1. Master skills in obtaining neurological history and examination 
  2. Actively participate in discussing differential diagnosis 
  3. Learn to create a comprehensive management plan
  4. Become familiar with Neurology beyond the core requirements
  5. Gain more independence in dealing with neurological patients 
  6. Develop readiness for transition into residency
  7. Learn to perform lumbar punctures
  8. Learn basics of EEG and EMG/NCS
Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this elective, students should understand the principles of diagnosis and management of general neurological disorders.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course, based largely on clinical evaluations completed by all residents and faculty who work with them.
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40
2,4
Varrato, Jay
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8671 Elect in Inpatient Gen Neuro
The elective is under the supervision of a Neurology attending. Students become an integral part of a team that cares for patients with various neurological diseases. There are opportunities for participating in research projects.

Objectives:
  1. Master skills in obtaining neurological history and examination 
  2. Actively participate in discussing differential diagnosis 
  3. Learn to create a comprehensive management plan
  4. Become familiar with Neurology beyond the core requirements
  5. Gain more independence in dealing with neurological patients 
  6. Develop readiness for transition into residency
  7. Learn to perform lumbar punctures
  8. Learn basics of EEG and EMG/NCS
Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this elective, students should understand the principles of diagnosis and management of general neurological disorders.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course, based largely on clinical evaluations completed by all residents and faculty who work with them.
TGH
 1 - 11
None
1
0
40
2,4
Frontera, Alfred
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8671 Elect in Inpatient Gen Neuro
The elective is under the supervision of a Neurology attending. Students become an integral part of a team that cares for patients with various neurological diseases. There are opportunities for participating in research projects.

Objectives:
  1. Master skills in obtaining neurological history and examination 
  2. Actively participate in discussing differential diagnosis 
  3. Learn to create a comprehensive management plan
  4. Become familiar with Neurology beyond the core requirements
  5. Gain more independence in dealing with neurological patients 
  6. Develop readiness for transition into residency
  7. Learn to perform lumbar punctures
  8. Learn basics of EEG and EMG/NCS
Learning Outcomes:
Upon completion of this elective, students should understand the principles of diagnosis and management of general neurological disorders.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course, based largely on clinical evaluations completed by all residents and faculty who work with them.
T-VAH
 1 - 11
None
1
0
40
2,4
Chichkova, Rossitza
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8673 Elective in Epilepsy
Fourth-year medical students may spend a four-week elective in the Tampa General Hospital Comprehensive Epilepsy Program, USF clinics at Morsani and the South Tower as well as time at the James A Haley VA Hospital Epilepsy Center of Excellence. The elective is designed as a preceptorship under the supervision of an epilepsy attending. The student will become an integral part of a team that specializes in the care of patients with refractory epilepsy. The students will learn how to obtain a thorough epilepsy history and understand the spectrum of epilepsy syndromes. The students will also round with the attendings (and fellows when applicable) on the patients in the video-EEG monitoring unit daily. They will also have the opportunity to understand the basics of electroencephalography. Lastly, they will have several opportunities throughout the month to participate in Wada testing, which is used for language and memory lateralization. Attendance at weekly epilepsy surgery conference is mandatory. Interested students may also spend a few days at the pediatric epilepsy clinic and video-EEG monitoring unit at All Children’s Hospital based on availability.
Objectives:
  1. Students should understand the differential diagnosis of epilepsy
  2. Students should understand the difference between the different types of seizures and epilepsy syndromes and their implications
  3. Students should know the basics of video-EEG monitoring including its role and limitations
  4. Students will become familiar with identifying refractory epilepsy patients and will familiarize themselves with the non-medical treatments of epilepsy
  5. Students will learn the presurgical approach to patients with refractory focal epilepsies
Learning Outcomes:
Students will see the patients at TGH and the Morsani Center. Upon completion of this elective, students should understand the principles of diagnosis and management of patients who have epilepsy.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course, based largely on clinical evaluations completed by all residents and faculty who work with them.
TGH
 1 - 11
None
2
0
40
2,4
Benbadis, Selim
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8674 Elect in Headache & Pain Med
Third or fourth-year medical students may spend a two or four-week elective participating in the Headache and Pain Clinics at Tampa General Hospital (Rehabilitation Bldg), Tampa General Hospital Headache and Pain Medicine Consultation Service, USF South Tampa Medical Clinics and the USF Morsani Clinics. The elective is designed as a preceptorship under the supervision of Neurologists and Headache and Pain Specialists. The student will become an integral part of a team that specializes in Headache and Pain Medicine. The ability to obtain a comprehensive medical and neurological history as well as a detailed neurological examination wil be stressed. The student will observe a variety of interventional procedures such as botulinum toxin injections, trigger point injections and peripheral nerve blockade. The student will have the opportunity to learn acute treatment of a variety of headaches by attending the Headache Infusion Suite. Finally, the student will get acquainted with the interdisciplinary therapeutic Headache and Pain Medicine Team including but not limited to Neuromuscular Re-education/Biofeedback, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Psychological Intervention. Opportunities to participate in research projects are available. Participation in Didactic Lectures and Journal Clubs is mandatory.

Objectives:
  1. Manage the chronicity of headaches and the development of migraines
  2. Obtain a comprehensive medical and neurological history as well as a detailed examination
  3. Differentiate a variety of elements implicated in headache management
  4. Understand the role of neurotoxins, trigger point injections, and peripheral nerve blockade in the management of migraines and other headaches
  5. Understand the role of Neuromuscular Re-education/Biofeedback, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and psychological intervention plays in the treatment of headache and migraine
Learning Outcomes:
Students will see patients at the Headache and Pain Clinics at the Tampa General Hospital Rehabilitation Building and the USF Morsani Clinics.Upon completion of this elective, students should understand the principles of diagnosis and management of patients with the diagnosis of headaches and migraines.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course, based largely on clinical evaluations completed by all residents and faculty who work with them.
TGH
 1 - 11
None
2
0
40
2,4
Kalidas, Kavita
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8674 Elect in Headache & Pain Med
Third or fourth-year medical students may spend a two or four-week elective participating in the Headache and Pain Clinics at Tampa General Hospital (Rehabilitation Bldg), Tampa General Hospital Headache and Pain Medicine Consultation Service, USF South Tampa Medical Clinics and the USF Morsani Clinics. The elective is designed as a preceptorship under the supervision of Neurologists and Headache and Pain Specialists. The student will become an integral part of a team that specializes in Headache and Pain Medicine. The ability to obtain a comprehensive medical and neurological history as well as a detailed neurological examination wil be stressed. The student will observe a variety of interventional procedures such as botulinum toxin injections, trigger point injections and peripheral nerve blockade. The student will have the opportunity to learn acute treatment of a variety of headaches by attending the Headache Infusion Suite. Finally, the student will get acquainted with the interdisciplinary therapeutic Headache and Pain Medicine Team including but not limited to Neuromuscular Re-education/Biofeedback, Physical Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Psychological Intervention. Opportunities to participate in research projects are available. Participation in Didactic Lectures and Journal Clubs is mandatory.

Objectives:
  1. Manage the chronicity of headaches and the development of migraines
  2. Obtain a comprehensive medical and neurological history as well as a detailed examination
  3. Differentiate a variety of elements implicated in headache management
  4. Understand the role of neurotoxins, trigger point injections, and peripheral nerve blockade in the management of migraines and other headaches
  5. Understand the role of Neuromuscular Re-education/Biofeedback, physical therapy, occupational therapy, and psychological intervention plays in the treatment of headache and migraine
Learning Outcomes:
Students will see patients at the Headache and Pain Clinics at the Tampa General Hospital Rehabilitation Building and the USF Morsani Clinics.Upon completion of this elective, students should understand the principles of diagnosis and management of patients with the diagnosis of headaches and migraines.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course, based largely on clinical evaluations completed by all residents and faculty who work with them.
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
1
0
40
2,4
Kalidas, Kavita
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8675 Elective in Movement Disorders
All students enrolled in this elective must email Dr. Zesiewicz at tzesiewi@health.usf.edu at the start of the academic year.
This elective will provide instruction in the diagnosis and treatment of movement disorders. Students will rotate with each of the movement disorders physicians (Dr. Zesiewicz, Sanchez-Ramos, and Hauser) one day per week. Students will also observe a movement disorder neurosurgeon, either in the OR or in clinic, one day per week (Drs. Smith and Vale). The diagnosis, treatment, and pathophysiology of movement disorders will be emphasized. Movement disorders will consist of Parkinson's disease, Essential tremor, Dystonia, Ataxia, Tic disorders, Huntington's Disease, and others. Students will have the opportunity to participate in evaluation and management of patients with a variety of movement disorders including Parkinson’s disease, Atypical Parkinsonisms, Essential tremor, dystonia, and chorea. Students may also have the opportunity to observe clinical trial visits and injections of botulinum toxin for movement disorders.
Objectives:
  1. Diagnose movement disorders, including Parkinson's disease, Essential Tremor, Dystonia, Ataxia, and Huntington's disease
  2. Experience in treatment of movement disorders, including observing botulinum toxin injection
  3. Observe with the movement disorders neurosurgeons
  4. Provide opportunity for participation in clinical or basic science research in movement disorders
Learning Outcomes:
Students see patients at the North and South Campus Movement Disorder centers and on the consultative services at Tampa General Hospital. Upon completion of this elective, students should understand the principles of diagnosis and management of patients who have movement disorders.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course, based largely on clinical evaluations completed by all residents and faculty who work with them.
MCAH
 1 - 11
None
1
0
40
2,4
Zesiewicz, Theresa
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8677 Outpatient Neurology
Prior approval of Dr. Varrato is required 3 months prior to the rotation.

With the course director's assistance, the student will construct a calendar of outpatient experiences which can include any or all of the following Clinics: Alzheimer's Disease; brain tumor; cancer pain; epilepsy; general neurology; headache and chronic pain; independent neurological evaluation; neuro-muscular; multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease; and stroke. Selected reading will be advised. The course is designed to assist students who want a career in primary care or neurology as they prepare for outpatient delivery of care. 
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
44-50
2,4
Varrato, Jay
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8677 Outpatient Neurology
With the course director's assistance, the student will construct a calendar of outpatient experiences which can include any or all of the following Clinics: Alzheimer's Disease; brain tumor; cancer pain; epilepsy; general neurology; headache and chronic pain; independent neurological evaluation; neuro-muscular; multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's Disease; and stroke. Selected reading will be advised. The course is designed to assist students who want a career in primary care or neurology as they prepare for outpatient delivery of care.
The department may assign students to USF Clinics, the James A. Haley or Bay Pines Veteran's Hospitals, Moffitt Cancer Center, Harbourside Medical Tower, or Tampa General Hospital to complete this elective.
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
2
0
44-50
2,4
Frontera, Alfred
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8678 Vascular Neurology
The student must meet with the faculty member with whom they plan to work and/or Dr. Varrato to plan the elective prior to scheduling.
This elective is designed to give fourth-year students more extensive exposure to the practice of Vascular Neurology. Under the supervision of clinical faculty, students will have the opportunity to evaluate patients with known or suspected stroke syndromes in hospital and ambulatory clinical environments. Students will round with the Stroke Team in the hospital on the Vascular Neurology Service and see patients in the outpatient stroke clinics under the supervision of a Vascular Neurology Attending. The elective will provide students with a better understanding of the dimension of Stroke, which is a leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death in the United States. Students will also get exposure to interventional neurology as it pertains to the management of ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage and gain experience in critical care neurology as it pertains to the management of patients with ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage.
Objectives:
  1. Recognize the heterogenous nature of stroke syndromes and be able to differentiate them from non-stroke mimics
  2. Apply principles of evidence-based medicine to cerebrovascular diagnosis and management
  3. Evaluate the proper use of laboratory and neuroimaging studies in cerebrovascular diagnosis 
  4. Appreciate the diagnostic and management algorithms in acute stroke intervention
  5. Understand the principles of management of acute ischemic stroke
  6. Understand the principles of management of acute hemorrrhagic stroke
  7. Identify risk factors and treatment strategies for primary and secondary prevention of stroke
Learning Outcomes:
Students will see patients at Tampa General Hospital and the South Tampa Center for Advanced Health Care. Upon completion of this elective, students should understand the principles of diagnosis and management of patients who have vascular neurological disorders.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course, based largely on clinical evaluations completed by all residents and faculty who work with them.
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-60
2,4
Varrato, Jay
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8678 Vascular Neurology
This elective is designed to give fourth-year students more extensive exposure to the practice of Vascular Neurology. Under the supervision of clinical faculty, students will have the opportunity to evaluate patients with known or suspected stroke syndromes in hospital and ambulatory clinical environments. Students will round with the Stroke Team in the hospital on the Vascular Neurology Service and see patients in the outpatient stroke clinics under the supervision of a Vascular Neurology Attending. The elective will provide students with a better understanding of the dimension of Stroke, which is a leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death in the United States. Students will also get exposure to interventional neurology as it pertains to the management of ischemic stroke and subarachnoid hemorrhage and gain experience in critical care neurology as it pertains to the management of patients with ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage and subarachnoid hemorrhage.
Objectives:
  1. Recognize the heterogenous nature of stroke syndromes and be able to differentiate them from non-stroke mimics
  2. Apply principles of evidence-based medicine to cerebrovascular diagnosis and management
  3. Evaluate the proper use of laboratory and neuroimaging studies in cerebrovascular diagnosis 
  4. Appreciate the diagnostic and management algorithms in acute stroke intervention
  5. Understand the principles of management of acute ischemic stroke
  6. Understand the principles of management of acute hemorrrhagic stroke
  7. Identify risk factors and treatment strategies for primary and secondary prevention of stroke
Learning Outcomes:
Students will see patients at Tampa General Hospital and the South Tampa Center for Advanced Health Care. Upon completion of this elective, students should understand the principles of diagnosis and management of patients who have vascular neurological disorders.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course, based largely on clinical evaluations completed by all residents and faculty who work with them.
TGH
 1 - 11
None
1
0
40-60
2,4
Rose, David
Clinical
Neurology
 
 MEL 8690 Research in Neurology
This elective course is designed for the student who is interested in furthering his/her neurological knowledge by concentrating on an area of clinical research with the expectation of reporting the results in a paper. The student will work directly with one or more departmental faculty members in researching the literature, collecting clinical data and in approaching a particular subject. Research can be conducted in a number of areas including: Alzheimer's Disease, epilepsy and EEG, cancer and chronic pain, neuro-oncology, neurotoxicology, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s Disease, neuro-muscular disease, and stroke. The elective is offered with approval of the chairman.
Evaluation:
Grades will be determined by faculty evaluation and resulting paper.
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
2
0
44
2,4
Brock, Charles
Research
Neurology
 
MEL 7320N Externship - Neurology
EXT
 1 - 7
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
44
4
Faculty
Externship
Neurology
 
MEL 9999N Indep Study - Neurology
USFMS or LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
40
2,4
Faculty
Indep Study
NeuroSurg
 
 BCC 8122 Neurosurgery AI
Report to:
Chief Neurosurgery Resident for morning rounds at 6:30 am on the first day
Neuroscience ICU 5th Floor at Tampa General Hospital
This will be a clinical experience in which the student will work under the supervision of the Residents and Fellows in Neurological Surgery, and the attending neurosurgeons at the College of Medicine. It will be based at Tampa General Hospital. There will be a concentrated experience in the diagnosis and management of neurosurgical illness and active participation in the radiological, clinical, and teaching rounds.
Students will participate in daily ward rounds and will be integrated into the ward management team. Participating students will be required to submit neurological histories and physicals and to follow their patients from the time of admission through surgery into the post-operative period and discharge. At least one oral presentation will be expected during the rotation. Student participation in the operating room will be geared toward individual talents at the discretion of the operating surgeon.
Evaluation:
At the conclusion of the rotation, the student should be quite familiar with and have a basic appreciation of the scope of neurosurgical practice and the approach to neurological emergencies. Students will be evaluated by a consensus of the faculty and fellows based on their ward performance, conference performance, and the quality of their histories and physicals.
TGH
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
4
0
40-70
4
Vale, Fernando
Clinical
NeuroSurg
 
 BCC 8122 Neurosurgery AI
The student will be associated with neurosurgical surgeons whose patients' exhibit a wide spectrum of neurological problems, including brain and cord neoplasm and acute and chronic cranial and cordtrauma. Activities will include bedside neurological diagnosis, assisting in the neurological operating room, participating in rounds and observing angiographic and CT diagnostic procedures.
Objectives:
  1. Describe common neurosurgical disorders
  2. Be able to develop a differential diagnosis for a patient with neurosurgical disease
  3. Assist in neurosurigcal cases and procedures
  4. Participate in daily rounds and evaluations of patients.
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated based on their ward performance.
LVH-CC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40-70
4
Li, Mark
Clinical
NeuroSurg
 
 MEL 7881 Neurosurgical Research
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS
The student will be exposed to a variety of techniques currently used in neuroscience research including anatomic, behavioral, histologic, imaging, and physiologic assessment in laboratories currently emphasizing research in neural tissue transplantation, molecular biology, angiogenesis in brain tumors, and spinal biomechanics. Short clinical research projects can also be arranged if planned well in advance.
This rotation is considered an introductory step for students who may be planning an academic course and can be tailored to the individual student's interests and needs.
Evaluation:
Evaluation will be based on faculty assessment of the student's research productivity.
USFMS
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
3
0
44
2,4
Vale, Fernando
Research
NeuroSurg
 
MEL 7320V Externship - Neurosurgery
EXT
 1 - 7
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
44
4
Faculty
Externship
NeuroSurg
 
MEL 9999V Indep Study - Neurosurgery
USFMS
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
40
2,4
Faculty
Indep Study
Ob/Gyn
 
 MDE 8162 Gynecologic Oncology
Students will be expected to demonstrate a level of skill in-patient care of both gynecologic oncology in-patients and outpatients comparable to an intern completing his/her first gynecologic oncology rotation. Student will demonstrate knowledge of responsibilities of an intern by completing all intern related administrative tasks under supervision of chief resident and assigned faculty mentor.
 Objectives:
  1. Will act as the primary provider (house officer): admit, develop management and diagnostic plan for the gynecologic oncology patient and have plan for initial orders for assigned patients.
  2. Will follow up on patient’s status and develops new management and diagnostic plans for assigned gynecologic oncology patient.
  3. Will be assistant surgeon for procedures as level of training allows.
  4. Will follow, round on, document upon, and present assigned patients on the gynecologic oncology service during daily rounds.
  5. Will manage a sufficient number of patients as a medical student to gain skills, attitudes, and knowledge necessary to function as the primary physician and demonstrate critical aspects of caring for oncologic patients.
  6. Will see patient in the ambulatory gynecologic office setting with faculty attendings when assigned
  7. Will participate in and develop and understanding for the principles of robotic surgery 
  8. Develop communication skills regarding the care of complex patients with morbidity and cancer.
  9. Will research, prepare, and present a 15 minute oral presentation relating to a chosen gynecologic oncologic topic during the rotation.
Evaluation:
Evaluation will be based on clinical performance in the role as acting intern to include assessment of charting skills, clinical diagnostic skills, ability to formulate differential diagnoses, oral presentation skills and oral presentation, and general work ethic. The student's ability and willingness to work as an integral part of the team will be assessed and emphasized. It will include:
  • Daily Inpatient Service clinical observation
  • Daily Ambulatory service clinical observation
  • Daily Surgical service clinical observation
  • Daily oral feedback
  • End of period oral feedback
  • Written feedback
  • Written evaluation by the chief resident and Gynecology Oncology faculty assigned to the team
LVH-CC 
  1 - 11
Yr 4 Status 
80 
Martino, Martin 
Clinical
Ob/Gyn
 
 MDE 8164 Adv Ob/Gyn Milestone Elective
This elective is designed for senior students who have chosen to pursue a career in obstetrics & gynecology.  It will specifically make sure the students meet the level 1 ACGME defined milestones.  Level 1 milestones are knowledge, skills, attitudes, and other attributes that ACGME expects that an incoming resident should have.  Under the supervision of clinical faculty, students will obtain knowledge and skills that will help facilitate transition into residency.
Objectives:
  1. Demonstrate basic knowledge of normal obstetrical care and common medical complications seen in pregnancy
  2. Demonstrate basic knowledge of routine / uncomplicated intrapartum obstetrical care including conduct of labor
  3. Demonstrate basic knowledge of normal postpartum care
  4. Demonstrate basic surgical procedures and basic gynecology office procedures
  5. Demonstrates knowledge of basic abdominal and pelvic anatomy
  6. Demonstrates basic knowledge of common ambulatory gynecology problems    
Students will undergo a curriculum that addresses each of the ACGME Level 1 Milestones. The milestones will be taught and evaluated through simulation, clinical case scenarios, and case based learning. 
Methods:
Students will undergo a curriculum that addresses each of the ACGME Level 1 MIlestones. The milestone will be taught and evaluated through simulation, clinical case scenarios, and case-based learning.  
Evaluation:
Students will be evaluated by performance on meeting the ACGME Level 1 Milestones.  This will be done through graded written tests, clinical case scenarios, and simulation exercises.  Grades will be determined based on these evaluations done at the end of the course. 
LVHN
11B
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
40
2
Black, Christina
 Clinical
Ob/Gyn
 
 MDE 8165 Gynecology Elective
Contact:
Stephanie-Marie Jones
Stephanie-Ma_Jones@lvhn.org
Contact at least one week in advance to set up the first day meeting to review expectations.
This elective is intended for those students who wish to obtain additional background in gynecology and gynecologic surgery. This course would be most beneficial to those considering training in obstetrics and gynecology. Requests for the elective may be preferentially granted to students who express a genuine interest in performing their ObGyn residency training at Lehigh Valley Health Network in the future. These students will learn to demonstrate a level of skill in-patient care of both gynecology in-patients and outpatients comparable to an intern completing his/her initial gynecologic rotation. Students will also demonstrate knowledge of responsibilities of an intern by completing all intern related administrative tasks under supervision of gynecology resident and assigned faculty mentor.
Objectives:
  1. Will act as the primary provider (house officer): admit, develop management and diagnostic plan for the gynecology patient and have plan for initial orders for assigned patients
  2. Will follow up on patient’s status and develops new management and diagnostic plans for assigned gynecology patients
  3. Will be assistant surgeon and/or participate in procedures as level of training allows
  4. Will follow, round on, document upon, and present assigned patients on the gynecology service during daily rounds
  5. Will manage a sufficient number of patients as an acting intern to gain skills, attitudes, and knowledge necessary to function as the primary physician and demonstrate critical aspects of caring for gynecology patients
  6. Will see patient in the ambulatory gynecology office setting with faculty attendings when assigned
  7. Will participate in and develop and understanding for the principles of gynecologic surgery
Description of course activities:
  1. Oral presentation at end of rotation
  2. Attend OR cases assigned to you by chief gynecology resident  unless assigned to clinic that day
  3. Gynecology Outpatient clinic four half days/ month.
  4. Each week, student will meet with an assigned clinical attending.  During this time, can go over questions on assigned readings.
    1. Week 1:  Discuss expectations, Set up personal objectives for month
    2. Week 2:  H&P, Operative note, Postoperative Note, and Outpatient Note
    3. Week 3:  H&P, Operative note, Postoperative Note, and Outpatient note 
    4. Week 4:  Oral Case presentation & Demonstrate One Handed and Two Handed Knots  Final Evaluation
  5. Complete Passport
  6. Complete Log Sheet regarding surgeries 
Absentee Policy:
Students are allowed to miss one day without having to make the shift up.  Studenst must notify the gynecology rotation attending leader prior to any missed days. 
Evaluation:
Written evaluation by the chief resident and gynecology faculty assigned to the team. Evaluation will be based on clinical performance in the role as acting intern to include assessment of charting skills, clinical diagnostic skills, ability to formulate differential diagnoses, oral presentation skills and oral presentation, and general work ethic. The student's ability and willingness to work as an integral part of the team will be assessed and emphasized.   Completion of rotational procedure log will be required.
50% Attending/ Resident Evaluations
30% Case Presentation
20% Notes & Completion of Passport and Log
LVHN
  5 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
60
4
Jones, Stephanie-Marie
Clinical
Ob/Gyn 
 
 MDE 8168 Urogynecology
Students will be expected to demonstrate a level of skill in-patient care of both urogynecology in-patients and outpatients comparable to an intern completing his/her initial gynecologic rotation. Student will demonstrate knowledge of responsibilities of an intern by completing all intern related administrative tasks under supervision of the assigned urogynecology resident and faculty mentor. 
Objectives:
  1. Will act as the primary provider (house officer): admit, develop management and diagnostic plan for the urogynecology patient and have plan for initial orders for assigned patients.
  2. Will follow up on patient’s status and develops new management and diagnostic plans for assigned urogynecology patients.
  3. Will be assistant surgeon and/or participate in procedures as level of training allows.
  4. Will follow, round on, document upon, and present assigned patients on the urogynecology service during daily rounds.
  5. Will manage a sufficient number of patients as a  sub-intern to gain skills, attitudes, and knowledge necessary to function as the primary physician and demonstrate critical aspects of caring for urogynecology patients.
  6. Will see patient in the ambulatory urogynecology office setting with faculty attendings when assigned
  7. Will participate in and develop and understanding for the principles of pelvic reconstructive surgery and the use of robotics and synthetic adjuncts 
  8. Will research, prepare, and present a 15 minute power point oral presentation relating to a chosen urogynecology topic during the rotation
Evaluation:
Evaluation will be based on clinical performance in the role as acting intern to include assessment of charting skills, clinical diagnostic skills, ability to formulate differential diagnoses, oral presentation skills and oral presentation, and general work ethic. The student's ability and willingness to work as an integral part of the team will be assessed and emphasized. Completion of rotational procedure log will be required. Evaluation areas will include:
  • Daily clinical observation of Inpatient Service
  • Daily clinical observation of Ambulatory Service
  • Daily clinical observation of Surgery Service
  • Daily oral feedback
  • Daily end of period oral feedback
  • Written feedback
  • Written evaluation by the chief resident and urogynecology faculty assigned to the team
 LVH-M
 1 - 11 
Yr 4 Status 
 80
Espaillat-Rijo, Luis
Clinical
Ob/Gyn 
 
 MDE 8180 Maternal-Fetal Medicine
Location:
3900 Hamilton Blvd, Suite 201- Allentown, PA
The purpose of this rotation is to advance your knowledge in the area of Maternal Fetal Medicine. Below is the general outline of the requirements of the rotation. Your elective can be tailored; if there is something else you would like to gain exposure to, please do not hesitate to discuss this with your preceptor. 
Students will be expected to demonstrate a level of skill in patient care of both high risk obstetrical patients who are in-patients and outpatients comparable to an intern completing his/her MFM rotation. Student will demonstrate knowledge of responsibilities of an intern on MFM service by completing all related administrative tasks under supervision of assigned faculty mentor. 
Objectives:
  1. Will gain exposure and develop a comfort level with  inpatient management of MFM patients including antepartum patients in PNU  with obstetrical and medical complications and complicated patients on labor and delivery
  2. Will develop an understanding of the management of patients in the high-risk obstetrical clinic including those requiring pre-conceptual counseling, genetic counseling, and antepartum consultations
  3. Will become familiar with principles of perinatal ultrasound and associated procedures including amniocentesis, chorionic villus sampling, and PUBs
  4. Will learn about both maternal and obstetrical complication during pregnancy 
Evaluation:
Evaluation areas will include:
  • Daily Inpatient Service evaluation
  • Daily Ambulatory Service evaluation
  • Daily oral feedback
  • End of period feedback
  • Written feedback
  • Completed H&P on Antepartum MFM patient and  outpatient seen in High Risk Clinic or MFM office during rotation
  • Completed oral project (slide set)
  • Completed “antepartum” procedural passport
LVHN 
 1 - 11 
Yr 4 Status
 80
Coassolo, Kara 
Clinical 
Ob/Gyn 
 
 MDE 8181 Obstetrics Elective
The purpose of this rotation is to advance your knowledge in the area of inpatient obstetrics. Below is the general outline of the requirements of the rotation. Your elective can be tailored, however, if there is something specific to which you would like to gain exposure. Please do not hesitate to discuss this with your preceptor. 
Students will be expected to develop a level of skill in patient care of obstetrical patients comparable to an intern on his/her obstetrics rotation. Student will demonstrate knowledge of responsibilities of an intern on obstetrics service by completing all related clinical and administrative tasks under supervision of assigned faculty mentor. 
Objectives:
  1. Perform initial assessment of patients in the triage area by conducting history and supervised physical exams, participating in decisions regarding management, admitting patients as appropriate and counseling patients being discharged on necessary follow-up
  2. In conjunction with residents and attending staff, perform ongoing assessment of intrapartum patients and manage their labor progress
  3. Under supervision, perform vaginal deliveries and laceration repair
  4. Participate in cesarean deliveries with level of participation at the discretion of the attending physician
  5. Perform postpartum rounds with resident obstetrics team
  6. May engage in antepartum teaching rounds 
Evaluation:
Evaluation areas will include: 
  • Daily clinical observation from Inpatient Service
  • Daily oral feedback
  • End of period oral feedback
  • Written feedback
  • Resident assessment
  • Faculty assessment
  • Completed notes – may be completed in CPN and then reviewed by name and MR# by course faculty:  H&P on labor patient, intrapartum progress note, and postpartum note for SVD and C-S patients
  • Completed oral project to be presented at morning report in second half of rotation
  • Completed procedural passport
LVH-CC 
 5 - 11 
Yr 4 Status 
60 
Diven, Liany 
Clinical  
Ob/Gyn 
 
 MDI 8162 Acting Internship in Gynecology
Students will be expected to demonstrate a level of skill in-patient care of both gynecology in-patients and outpatients comparable to an intern completing his/her initial gynecologic rotation. Student will demonstrate knowledge of responsibilities of an intern by completing all intern related administrative tasks under supervision of gynecology resident and assigned faculty mentor. 
Objectives:
  1. Will act as the primary provider (house officer): admit, develop management and diagnostic plan for the gynecology patient and have plan for initial orders for assigned patients.
  2. Will follow up on patient’s status and develops new management and diagnostic plans for assigned gynecology patients.
  3. Will be assistant surgeon and/or participate in procedures as level of training allows.
  4. Will follow, round on, document upon, and present assigned patients on the gynecology service during daily rounds.
  5. Will manage a sufficient number of patients as an acting intern to gain skills, attitudes, and knowledge necessary to function as the primary physician and demonstrate critical aspects of caring for gynecology patients.
  6. Will see patient in the ambulatory gynecology office setting with faculty attendings when assigned
  7. Will participate in and develop and understanding for the principles of gynecologic surgery.
Evaluation:
Evaluation will be based on clinical performance in the role as acting intern to include assessment of charting skills, clinical diagnostic skills, ability to formulate differential diagnoses, oral presentation skills and oral presentation, and general work ethic. The student's ability and willingness to work as an integral part of the team will be assessed and emphasized.   Completion of rotational procedure log will be required.
50% Attending/ Resident Evaluations.
20% Case Presentation
20% Notes & Completion of Passport and Log
10% Oral Exam.
 
Evaluation areas will include: 
  • Daily observation of Inpatient Service, Ambulatory, Surgery
  • Daily oral feedback
  • End of period feedback
  • Written feedback
  • Oral examination
  • Written evaluation by the chief resident and gynecology faculty assigned to the team
LVHN
 1 - 11 
Yr 4 Status 
80 
Jones, Stephanie-Marie 
Clinical  
Ob/Gyn
 
 MEL 8420 Ob/Gyn Subspecialty Elective
This elective is offered to introduce the fourth year medical students to 2 subspecialties within the field of Obstetrics and Gynecology. The students will be supervised by the division directors. The student will work one-on-one with the subspecialist attending and/or fellow for individualize exposure to the subspecialty. The format will provide a clinical, procedural, and operative exposure to the subspecialty. When part of the Ob/Gyn track, an emphasis will be on scholarly concentration towards publication of a case report or on-going research in an Ob/Gyn subspecialty.
The department will accept 2 students per month in periods 2,3,4,5,7,8,9,10. The desired specialty may not always be available, thus students must meet with Dr. James Mayer prior to the rotation to determine the specific subspecialty.
Subspecialties available in the following areas:
  1. GYN Oncology
  2. Female Pelvic Medicine & Reconstructive Surgery (FPMRS)
  3. Maternal Fetal Medicine
  4. REI (Reproductive Endocrinology & Infertility)
Objectives:
  1. Provide an introduction and appreciation to an Ob/Gyn sub-specialty
  2. Develop student independent interest and research in the sub-specialty
  3. Provide the student with a clinical interactive opportunity with a sub-specialty attending
Evaluation:
The division director of each sub-specialty will be responsible for evaluating the student. 
TGH/MCAH
 1-11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40
4
Mayer, James
Clinical
Ob/Gyn
 
 MEL 8421 Ob/Gyn Acting Internship
This course is for those students who wish to gain additional experience in. Requests for the acting internship will be preferentially granted to USF students who are pursuing a career in ObGyn and who need to complete the acting internship as part of their ObGyn track.  It may then be preferentially granted to students who express a genuine interest in an ObGyn residency, especially Lehigh Valley Health Network. The purpose of this rotation is to advance your knowledge primarily in the area of inpatient obstetrics. Below is the general outline of the requirements of the rotation. Your acting internship can be tailored, however, if there is something specific to which you would like to gain exposure. Please do not hesitate to discuss this with your preceptor.

Objectives:

  1. Perform initial assessment of patients in the triage area by conducting history and supervised physical exams, participating in decisions regarding management, admitting patients as appropriate and counseling patients being discharged on necessary follow-up
  2. In conjunction with residents and attending staff, perform ongoing assessment of intrapartum patients and manage their labor progress
  3. Under supervision, perform vaginal deliveries and laceration repair
  4. Participate in cesarean deliveries with level of participation at the discretion of the attending physician
  5. Perform postpartum rounds with resident obstetrics team
  6. May engage in antepartum teaching rounds
Additionally the acting intern on this rotation will participate in ambulatory ob/gyn clinic with a designated faculty member on a weekly basis.  In this setting, the patient should primarily focus on preconception consults, antepartum obstetric care, and postpartum follow-up.
Students are expected to demonstrate a level of skill in patient care of obstetrical patients comparable to an intern on his/her obstetrics rotation. Student will demonstrate knowledge of responsibilities of an intern on obstetrics service by completing all related clinical and administrative tasks under supervision of assigned faculty mentor.
Specific requirements:
  1. Internship faculty will be responsible for the student’s orientation and completion of the evaluation although it is expected that you will interact with other members of the General Obstetrics/Gynecology and Maternal-Fetal Medicine staff. The student will be expected to meet with their preceptor at the start, mid-point and completion of the rotation.  YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR SETTING ALL MEETINGS WITH YOUR PRECEPTOR so please contact the preceptor at the start of the rotation.
  2. Acting Intern is expected to function as a member of the obstetrics team. The team consists of the resident staff (typically 1-2 PGY1, 1-2 PGY2, PGY3, PGY4), general ob/gyn attending physicians, MFM specialist, ED resident, third year medical students, CNM, and nurses.
  3. Acting Intern is expected to follow and participate in the care of designated patients. S/he will be assigned 1-3 patients to follow at any one time and are expected to assume responsibility of those patients while they are inpatients. This responsibility includes initial assessment/evaluation, intrapartum management, rounding on these patients in conjunction with the appropriate resident and on-service attending, and contributing to management decisions of these patients.
  4. Acting Intern will have the opportunity and be expected to see an appropriate distribution of patients that correlates with the attached list of common clinical situations that an obstetrician routinely encounters. Please attach a patient demographic sticker on the form by the type of patient encounter. YOU ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR MAKING SURE THAT YOU TAKE ADVANTAGE OF CARING FOR A DIVERSE SELECTION OF PATIENT PROBLEMS WHILE ON THE SERVICE. These patients occur with enough frequency that you should have no problem completing this list during your rotation. Failure to complete this list may result in an incomplete rotation.
  5. Acting Interns will be expected to present a 15 minute talk during the last week of the rotation. This presentation will be occur during morning report and can focus on a perinatal topic or an interesting patient seen during the rotation. The topic of the presentation should be determined by the midpoint in the rotation and approved by the preceptor.
  6. The acting intern will participate in ambulatory ob/gyn clinic in a general ob/gyn’s office.  The day of the week may vary but the frequency will be one half day or one full day weekly and ideally with the same provider to allow the student to have autonomy to see patients independently (with appropriate oversight) and to expand his/her clinical abilities and medical knowledge. In this setting, the patient should primarily focus on preconception consults, antepartum obstetric care, and postpartum follow-up.  
Call Schedule:  
This course is setup with two weeks of dayfloat from Monday through Friday and two weeks of nightfloat Sunday night through Thursday night. Students may also need to use weekend call shifts to make up time missed during the rotation.
Students will attend morning educational sessions, neonatal and ultrasound conferences, grand rounds presentations, and possibly resident education series.
Deliverables at completion of Acting Internship:
  1. Completed notes – may be completed in CPN and then reviewed by name and MR# by course faculty:  H&P on labor patient, intrapartum progress note, and postpartum note for SVD and C-S patients
  2. Completed oral project to be presented at morning report in second half of rotation
  3. Completed procedural passport
 

 

 

LVHN
  1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40-60
4
Black, Christina
Clinical
Ob/Gyn
 
 MEL 8421 Ob/Gyn Acting Internship
NOT AVAILABLE TO VISITING STUDENTS. 

The Ob/Gyn Acting Internship is a month long concentrated clinical experience at Tampa General Hospital in the Bayshore Pavilion, Women’s Center - labor and delivery, ante-partum and postpartum areas. All efforts are made to directly expose and incorporate the fourth year medical student as a member of the labor and delivery team. The acting intern will triage, admit, and deliver those patients to whom they have been assigned. 

The student will be supervised by USF Department of Ob/Gyn clinical faculty and residents that are part of the labor and delivery medical team. The course will provide the student with a comprehensive exposure to the unique combination of medical and surgical care provided to patients during labor and delivery. The course will challenge the student to participate as an active member of the team, within the unique dynamics of labor and delivery.
Objectives:
  1. Advance and mature the knowledge base and clinical skills in the care of the obstetrical patient
  2. Demonstrate the independence of developing an assessment and plan for patient care to be presented, reviewed, and agreed upon by the medical team
  3. Acknowledge and demonstrate responsibility and professionalism to patients, team and staff
  4. Actively participate in all patient care directly or indirectly, attempting to meet patient care and team needs at all times
  5. Share knowledge, support, and compassion to patients, team, and staff
  6. Reflect, study, read, and be prepared, demonstrating growth by the next shift
  7. Ask for and appreciate constructive feedback
  8. Have fun
Evaluation:
Formal evaluation forms will be completed by the Labor and Delivery faculty and resident team members. 
TGH
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
40-60
4
Mayer, James
Clinical
Ob/Gyn
 
MEL 7320O Externship - OB/GYN
EXT
 1 - 9
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
40
4
Faculty
Externship
Ob/Gyn
 
MEL 9999O Indep Study - OB/GYN
USFMS or LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
40
2,4
Faculty
Indep Study
Oncologic Sciences
 
 BCC 8117 Interdis Oncology Elective
Contact:
Dr. Sophie Dessureault|
Ph. 813-745-3636
Fax: 813 745 5665
sophie.dessureault@moffitt.org

The course will consist of a preceptor-based ambulatory rotation in one of the clinical programs at the Moffitt Cancer Center (e.g. Breast, GI, Thoracic, Heme Malignancies, GU, Neuro, GYN, Sarcoma, Cutaneous, Head & Neck), attendance at weekly interdisciplinary Tumor Boards, one session at the Lifetime Screening Center in which students can witness genetic counseling, and a few select experiences in sub-specialty fields (e.g. Infectious Diseases, Speech Pathology, Pain Clinic, Palliative Care, etc.) to better appreciate the full extent of total cancer care. Students will be evaluated by their preceptor and by the faculty who participate in their rotation. There will be no exams and no formal presentations to prepare. Students will participate in a journal club event and have the opportunity to review statistical methods used in the evaluation of published research studies.It is important to note that a significant degree of flexibility is allowed in order to individualize each student’s experience during this rotation. Even though all students will be exposed to some degree to all fields of oncology (medical oncology, surgical oncology, radiation oncology), students will be given the opportunity to focus their rotation in one or two areas of interests (e.g. medical oncology, surgical oncology, radiation oncology, pathology, radiology). This will allow for students interested in these specialties to focus their experience and also to obtain reference letters relevant to their residency program applications.

Objectives:
  1. In this elective, students will have an opportunity to learn the fundamental principles of oncology and the multidisciplinary approach to the prevention and screening of cancer, as well as the diagnostic workup, treatment, rehabilitation, and surveillance of cancer patients.
  2. They will have an opportunity to review the fundamental biology of cancer, carcinogenesis, epidemiology, tumor markers, tumor pathology, clinical pharmacology, tumor immunology, and endocrinology, as well as an understanding of potential benefits and complications of multimodality therapy.
  3. By the end of the rotation, students will be familiar with the natural history of common cancers (e.g. breast, lung, colorectal) and with the workup and management of individual cancer patients at the time of diagnosis and throughout the course of their disease.
  4. Students will understand the concept and significance of staging. They will have a basic knowledge of cancer treatment modalities, including surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and endocrine therapy.
  5. They will have a better understanding of the causes of pain and suffering in cancer patients and be familiar with the appropriate treatment options for palliation of symptoms. 
Evaluation:
The student will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course. The evaluation will be based upon feedback and written evaluations of the student's clinical performance by the attending physicians that the student worked with. 
MCC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
10
0
40
4
Dessureault, Sophie
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MDT 8200D Molec Bio of Cancer Care
The course is a review of the signaling transduction pathway that in “recent” years have become relevant to the study, but most important to the treatment of cancer and are the basis for the new paradigm of personalized medicine in oncology that Moffitt is championing. Morning didactic lectures as well as journal club presentations and faculty case presentations will be held in the Moffitt FOB1 Conference Room. Laboratory and specialty outpatient clinic rotations will take place at their corresponding locations in the Moffitt Campus.
The course consists of:
  • Basic science didactic lectures that describe the pathways and how they are relevant as targets to treat cancer (theory behind personalized medicine)
  • Didactic lectures that review the methods to analyze those pathways like IHC, FISH, gene analysis (microarray, DNA sequencing,), proteomics, etc… 
  • Rotations through some of the Moffitt laboratories to see first hand how these technologies work. 
  • Outpatient clinic rounds to see patients that are benefiting of the therapeutic options provided by these advances (practice and reality behind personalized medicine) 
  • Independent Research Project will consist of a project where the students will be first provided, in advance, seminal basic science articles as background references. Students will review the literature, identify, analyze and present clinical publications (minimum 2) relevant to the application of the personalized medicine concept to the care of the oncologic patient.
  • Interactive case presentation where the Faculty will present real cases of their own practice where the students will be asked to evaluate the patient (decision making of diagnosis and treatment) with real time faculty feed back (labs, x rays, scans, path, molecular studies).
Objectives:
The goal of this course is the re-introduction to the pathophysiology of common solid and hematologic malignancies with emphasis on the basic scientific foundations (molecular and technologic) currently available to better understand them and treat them. Clinical methods sessions are to complement the basic science review.

Evaluation:

Students will be evaluated on case presentations, journal club presentations, and interaction in clinic and didactic sessions.
MCC
 10A
Yr 4 Status
5
0
40
2
Chiappori, Alberto
Basic Science   
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MDE 7286 Flex Yr3 Elective in Onc Hosp Med
Contact:
Dr. Pabbathi
Smitha.Pabbathi@moffitt.org
813-745-6657

Students will rotate on the Internal and Hospital Medicine (IHM) Inpatient service at Moffitt Cancer Center. The student will have exposure to problems such as atrial fibrillation, heart failure, diabetes management, thromboembolic disease, transfusion medicine, and neutropenic fever within the context of the oncology patient. Students will also be exposed to managing cancer pain and be an integral part of end-of-life care discussions with patients and their families. The student will work directly with the IHM attending on the interdisciplinary teaching service. The interdisciplinary team consists of a resident, intern and AI in addition to social work, pharmacy, case management, and advance practice professionals. During the month, the student is expected to attend Morning Report, Noon conference, Grand Rounds and Board review sessions. Depending on student interest, there are additional opportunities to gain exposure to outpatient and consultative services also provided by the IHM program.
 Objectives:
  1. Introduction to comprehensive, interdisciplinary hospital-based care of cancer patients
  2. Learn how to perform complete history and physical examinations
  3. Master the art communication with writing a daily progress note as well as oral presentation
  4. Develop a thorough differential diagnosis in a problem based fashion
  5. Introduction to the management of many common inpatient medical problems/diagnoses
Evaluation:
Evaluation of the student will reflect the overall performance on the rotation including history and physical examination skills, constructing differential diagnosis and oral presentations by the attending physician.
MCC
 1 - 12
None, Yr 3 only
1
0
40-50
2
Pabbathi, Smitha
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MDE 8150T Intro to Palliative Onc Medicine and Hospice
Prior Approval Required: Any interested student MUST meet with Dr. Oberoi-Jassal to plan the elective.  Ideally this should be done at least 1 month prior to the start of the rotation. 
This elective is designed to introduce fourth year medical students to palliative care in an oncology setting.  Under the supervision of clinical faculty, students will have the opportunity to rotate on the inpatient consultative service and in the outpatient palliative care clinic at H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center.  This elective will provide students with experience managing the complex care of patients with advanced illness and at the end of life.  Students will be exposed to comprehensive interdisciplinary symptom assessment and management including chronic pain, dyspnea, nausea, constipation, anxiety, depression, insomnia and decreased appetite.  In addition, students will develop communication skills and techniques to break bad news and have meaningful advance care planning discussions.  
Objectives:
  1. Describe the domains of palliative care and outline means to address each domain in seriously ill patients. (Structures and processes, physical, psychological and psychiatric, social, spiritual, cultural, care of the imminently dying patient, and ethical and legal aspects of care)
  2. Recognize how to effectively assses and manage complex symptoms including dyspnea, nausea, constipation, anxiety, depression, insomnia and decreased appetite.
  3. Describe the principles of pain management in patients with chronic life limiting illness.
  4. Describe how to work collaboratively to deliver comprehensive palliative care through an interdisciplinary team approach.
  5. Demonstrate patient-centered interview techniques when giving bad news or clarifying goals of care.
  6. Develop the communication skills to hold a successful family meeting and hold meaningful advance care planning discussions.
  7. Evaluate what is normal and expected in the dying process, how to address these symptoms and guide caregivers in their understanding.
  8. Distinguish the services of inpatient hospice versus home hospice and recognize which patients are appropriate for referral to each service.
  9. Recognize patients that would benefit from specialist palliative care referrral.
Students will see patients on the  H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center palliative care inpatient consultative service and in the outpatient supportive care medicine clinics.  They will be directly involved in patient care by taking histories, performing physical examinations and developing an assessment and plan, and will have advance care planning discussions with patients and participate in family meetings.  Students will participate in weekly interdisciplinary team meetings, didactic lectures, monthly specialty conferences and the monthly Palliative Care Journal Club during their elective rotation. Student will participate in weekly required journal article reading (articles will be given) followed by discussion of the topic. Upon completion of this elective, students will be able to describe core principles of comprehensive palliative care and will be able to effectively recognize, assess and manage complex symptoms in the seriously ill patient.  Students will be able to effectively give bad news, discuss advance care planning, and identify symptoms common at the end of life and manage them.

Evaluation:

Students will be evaluated based on clinical evaluations completed by the course director.  There is a graded oral presentation of a topic of interest in palliative care, graded by the attending physician.  Grades are determined by: 40% clinical evaluations, 25% assessment and completion of patient interviews/clinical notes and required journal article reading, 25% oral presentation and 10% professionalism.
MCC
 1, 5-11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
44
4
Oberoi-Jassal, Ritika
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MDE 8292 Advanced Genitourinary Oncology
This elective is designed to introduce senior students to the practice of Genitorurinary (GU) Oncology. Under the supervision of clinical faculty, students will have the opportunity to fully integrate in the clinical aspects of GU oncology. Students will evaluate GU oncology patients in the outpatient setting as well as participate in the operating room and on the surgical wards. Students will become familiar with routine work up of GU malignancies, epidemiology, biology and clinical management of those diseases. For students participating in a 4-week rotation 1 week will be spent divided between GU medical oncology and GU pathology.
Objectives:
  1. Evaluate patients with newly diagnosed GU malignancies or patients with risk factors for GU malignancies
  2. Become familiar with routine operative management of GU malignancies as well as routine OR practices (sterile technique, suture placement, tying knots) and relevant operative anatomy.
  3. Learn routine post-operative care, including the surgical ward, of patients undergoing surgery for GU malignancies.
  4. Learn patient – physician skills of effective communication focusing on “delivering bad news”, surgical consent, and integration of patient preferences for care plans
  5. Participate in GU Tumor Board and Journal Club
  6. Prepare one topic with GU Oncology for presentation at weekly GU tumor board (10 minutes)
Evaluation:
  1. Medical Knowledge and Practice Based Learning - Does the medical student apply knowledge to the clinical situations?
  2. Patient Care - Does the medical student actively participate in patient care?
  3. Professionalism - Does the medical student act professionally (arrive on time, well groomed, act appropriately)?
  4. Communication - Does the medical student communicate effectively with attending staff, resident/fellows, nurses and supportive staff and with patients as well?
MCC
 1 -11
Surgical Care
2
0
40
2,4
Poch, Michael
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MDE 8633 Thoracic Surgical Oncology
This elective is designed to provide exposure to the presentation, evaluation and treatment of patients with lung and esophageal cancer as well as less frequent complex thoracic malignancies.  The student will gain exposure in the operating room and become familiar with the anatomy chest and cardio-pulmonary physiology.  Under the supervision of the clinical faculty, and in conjunction with surgical residents and fellows, the student will be fully integrated in the surgical team and be expected to make daily rounds on patients in the intensive care and ward, participate in the operating room and evaluate pre-op and post-op patients in clinic.  From a didactic stand-point the student will join the surgical team in conference and multi-disciplinary tumor boards.
Objectives:
  1. Conduct independently (but under supervision) an efficient consultation of a patient presenting to clinic with a thoracic malignancy
  2. Present in a concise, reliable and organized manner patient data during rounds, in tumor board and in clinic.
  3. Interpret basic Chest Xray and Chest CT Scan images and findings
  4. Demonstrate solid knowledge of chest anatomy and cardio-pulmonary physiology
  5. Demonstrate proficiency in the following technical skills: bronchoscopy, sub-cuticular stitching, flawless knot-tying, basic thoracoscopy, basic robotic manoeuveurs, insertion/removal of chest tubes  
Evaluation:
The student will be evaluated by the course director at the end elective, based on clinical evaluations completed by the faculty surgeons as well as the surgical resident/fellow and mid-level providers on service that month. The student will be expected to complete an oral presentation of a topic of interest by the 4th week of their rotation.  Grades are determined by: 75% clinical evaluations and 25% oral presentation.
MCC
 1 -11
Surgical Care
1
0
60
4
Fontaine, Jacques
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MDE 8646 Head and Neck Oncology
This elective is designed to give medical students an experience with multidisciplinary cancer care for Head and Neck Oncology patients.  In this surgically oriented rotation, students will have the opportunity to observe and assist in Head and Neck cancer resection and reconstructive operations (including microvascular reconstruction), participate in surgical and multidisciplinary clinics, and attend tumor board conferences, and participate in patient management with the in-patient Otolaryngology team.  The student will also be provided with some general Otolaryngology training both in the clinical setting and in the form of didactic lectures.  The rotation will take place at Moffitt Cancer Center main campus.
Objectives:
  1. Develop an understanding of the clinical applications of Head and Neck anatomy
  2. Practice taking a history on a complex head and neck cancer patient, learn the salient symptoms associated with head and neck cancer
  3. Practice head and neck physical examination skills
  4. Develop an appreciation for multidisciplinary care of the oncology patient
  5. Participate in complex head and neck surgical and reconstructive cases
  6. Learn basic postoperative head and neck patient assessment including assessment of flap viability
  7. Participate in team rounds and in-patient management with the Head and Neck Oncology team
Evaluation:
The trainee will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the rotation, with input from faculty members and residents and fellows with whom the student has worked.  The student will also be asked to prepare a "grand rounds" style lecture to be presented at tumor board on the last week of the rotation.  The  final grade will be based 80% on clinical evaluation and 20% on the grand rounds lecture.
MCC
 1 -11
None
1
0
40
2,4
Otto, Kristen
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MEL 8831 Surgical Oncology
Contact:
Dr. John Kiluk
John.Kiluk@moffitt.org

Prior Approval Required:
Students interested in a Surgical Oncology elective at Moffitt need to contact John Kiluk to plan their rotation. Timing of the elective may be dependent on availability of faculty that can be influenced by national meetings and vacations. 
 
This elective is designed for medical students who wish to gain an in depth experience in surgical oncology. The course is based at the Moffitt Cancer Center, a comprehensive cancer center designated by the National Cancer Institute. Students would be offered their choice of disease sites to focus their rotation on that include: Breast, GI, GU, GYN, Head and Neck, Cutaneous, or Thoracic. Students would be expected to participate in every aspect of patient care including: outpatient clinics, operative procedures, inpatient rounds, and tumor boards.
 The student will be assigned to work with surgeons based on disease sites. These sites include: Breast, GI, GU, GYN, Head and Neck, Cutaneous, or Thoracic. Students may elect to spend four weeks with one site or two weeks with two different sites. Students would be expected to participate in every aspect of patient care including: outpatient clinics (surgical as well as 2 days of medical oncology and 2 days of radiation oncology), procedures, inpatient rounds, and tumor boards.
Objectives:
  1. Expose students to the role of the surgeon in the diagnosis, management, and surveillance of cancer patients.
  2. Expose students to the importance other disciplines (medical oncology, radiation oncology, pathology, etc) play in the management of cancer patients.
  3.  Introduce students to various emotional responses of patients to cancer and how best to manage these responses.
  4. Expose students to the basics of clinical research in the care of cancer patients.
  5. Educate students on advantages and disadvantages to different diagnostic tests, surgical choices, chemotherapy regimens, radiation, and screening techniques. 

Evaluation:

The student will be evaluated by the course director at the end of the course. The evaluation will be based upon feedback and written evaluations of the student's clinical performance by the attending surgeons that the student worked with. The course will be designed to be satisfactory or unsatisfactory.
MCC
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
10
0
80
2,4
Kiluk, John 
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MEL 8308 Ambulatory Hematology-Oncology
Contact:
Regina Mills
regina.mills@moffitt.org

Dr. Michael Jaglal
Michael.jaglal@moffitt.org

The objective of this elective is to provide the student with a basic understanding of the principles of medical management evaluation and management of hematologic and cancer related problems in the outpatient setting. Students will participate with hematology/oncology fellows and faculty members in the care of patients seen at the H. L. Moffitt Cancer Center James A. Haley VA Medical Center, Tampa General Hospital and/or University of South Florida. There will be scheduled conference activities in which the student will participate. The student will see approximately 10 -12 established and 3-5 new patients per week. The student will be required to present and discuss, in depth, patient evaluation and management issues The student will be evaluated on the basis of the adequacy of patient evaluation and case presentations.
Objectives:
The clinical experience should allow the student to gain additional knowledge and experience in the following areas:
  1. Morphology, physiology, and biochemistry of blood, bone marrow, lymphatic tissue and spleen
  2. Etiology, epidemiology, natural history, diagnosis, pathology, staging and management of a wide variety of neoplastic and hematologic disorders
  3. Chemotherapeutic drugs, growth factors and their mechanisms of action, clinical indications, and limitations
  4. Assessment of tumor imaging by CT, MRI and nuclear imaging techniques
  5. Students should be able to recommend when to order diagnostic tests and be able to interpret the laboratory test results
  6. Pain management, palliative care and psychosocial management of patients with hematologic and neoplastic disorders
 
MCC
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
1
0
40
2,4
Jaglal, Michael
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MEL 8309 Inpatient Hematology
Contact (at least 8 weeks prior):
Regina Mills
regina.mills@moffitt.org

Dr. Michael Jaglal
Michael.jaglal@moffitt.org

 

The objective of this elective is to attain a solid understanding of the pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, diagnostic studies and management of malignant hematological disorders, hematologic complications of malignant diseases, and hematologic consequences of cancer chemotherapy. The student will serve as an acting intern on the inpatient hematology service and will have extensive contact with the attendings of the division who will provide the basic tutorial supervision in the Hematology Conferences. The students will be required to participate in teaching and patient care rounds, special patient care conferences, and scheduled hematology/oncology-related teaching conferences. The students also will be introduced and exposed to the specialized research projects occurring in the division as well as to the special laboratory evaluation procedures used in hematology. The students will be expected to prepare a literature review on a specified topic for presentation. The faculty will complete performance evaluations based on the clinical discussions and didactic presentations by the student and on the performance of the student in patient care-related activities
Objectives:
  1. The clinical experience should allow the student to gain additional knowledge and experience in the following areas:
  2. Morphology, physiology, and biochemistry of blood, bone marrow, lymphatic tissue and spleen
  3. Etiology, epidemiology, natural history, diagnosis, pathology, staging and management of a wide variety of neoplastic and hematologic disorders
  4. Chemotherapeutic drugs, growth factors and their mechanisms of action, clinical indications, and limitations
  5. Assessment of tumor imaging by CT, MRI and nuclear imaging techniques
  6. Multiagent chemotherapy protocols and combined modality therapies
  7. Management of neutropenia and immunocompromised patients
MCC
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
1
0
40
2,4
Jaglal, Michael
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MEL 8362 Infect-Cancer/Bone Marrow
Contact:
Dr. Aliyah Baluch
Aliyah.Baluch@moffitt.org

 

Bone Marrow Transplant Infectious Disease (BMT ID) rotation is conducted at Moffitt Cancer Center.  The BMT ID service is often consulted for standard ID issues such as bacteremias, urinary tract infections, pneumonias and HIV related issues.  In addition as Moffitt Cancer Center has a large dedicated bone marrow transplant unit with both autologous and allogeneic transplant recipients, there are infections seen in severely immunosuppressed persons.  As with the other sites for ID rotations, the BMT ID service utilizes a team approach headed by an Infectious Diseases attending on service and a variety of potential team members such as an ID fellow.  In addition to participating in bedside consultative rounds evaluating patients, there are daily didactic teachings.  The student’s progress during the elective rotation will be assessment during bedside and teaching rounds by the attending.  Teaching rounds include both general ID topics and bone marrow transplant related topics.  There are weekly assigned current topics discussed in an informal mini-Journal Club style.  Microbiology rounds are held monthly in a joint learning session between the ID services of the James A. Haley VA and Moffitt alongside Moffitt’s microbiology laboratory.
Objectives:
  1. Provide fundamental information that allows for the assessment and treatment of an infectious disease.
  2. Obtain an appreciation for the evolution of a patient’s care while in the hospital and understand how antimicrobial usage can affect it.
  3. Gain insight into the process of selecting antimicrobials and creating durations of therapy.
Evaluation:
Midway through the elective, there will be an informal evaluation process to allow the student to get early feedback as to the issues pertinent to an ID consultative service.  A formal evaluation will be undertaken at the end of the rotation where written comments are communicated to the student.  As mentioned above, daily feedback is often given back on the process of presentation skills and formulation of a good differential diagnosis from an ID perspective.
MCC
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
1
0
44
2,4
Baluch, Aliyah
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MEL 8366 Adult Bone Marrow Transplant
Contact:
Barbara Crawford
Barbara.Crawford@moffitt.org
 
The student will assist hematology/oncology fellows in the primary care of patients undergoing high dose ablative therapy and bone marrow transplantation while receiving treatment in the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit at the Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute. The student will be expected to attend daily teaching and work rounds, as well as teaching and research conferences. The student's ability to perform and present thorough histories and physical exams will be evaluated. The student's verbal and written patient progress reports will also be evaluated daily at morning rounds. Faculty will monitor student progress and give ongoing feedback throughout the elective. No written examination will be given although an evaluation of the student's performance will be available at the end of each rotation.
Objectives:
  1. Have an understanding of the process of bone marrow transplantation and the associated immunobiology of immune recovery after ablative therapy and stem cell infusion
  2. Identify the different types of transplantation (syngeneic, allogeneic, and autologous) and the diseases in which each type of transplantation may play a role in therapy
  3. Identify common problems related to marrow transplantation such as cytopenias; infectious complications; nutrition and electrolyte imbalance; renal, cardiac, and pulmonary insufficiencies; graft vs. host disease; as well as outline current medical means to support patients until marrow and immune recovery
MCC
 1 - 11
Adult Med, Pri Care
1
0
44
2,4
Nieder, Michael
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
 MEL 7740 Radiation-Oncology
Contact:
Angie Courtney
Angie.Courtney@moffitt.org
 
The Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, provides comprehensive, patient-oriented care for all types and stages of cancer using the most technically advanced equipment with concern for quality of life and education. 

This elective is an introduction to basic Radiation Oncology with emphasis on clinical service designed to provide a background for students planning to practice in related oncology fields or in Radiation Oncology. Students will be assigned to one or two preceptors and will learn about the various Radiation Oncology applications to a wide range of disease sites. The clinic rotations will be designed at a level of learning for medical students. During the rotation students will be supervised and instructed on a one-to-one basis by their preceptor(s), residents, fellows and other qualified faculty responsible for teaching and evaluation. In addition, students will attend regularly scheduled tumor board conferences and didactic programs as assigned by their preceptor(s).
Rotation requirements:
  • Read at least 10 pertinent articles from the medical literature.
  • Attend all departmental conferences and multidisciplinary conferences with the preceptors.
  • Participate in simulations, procedures, follow-ups, on treatment visits and treatment planning.
  • Present a 15 minute PowerPoint talk on a topic defined with the assistance of the faculty preceptor.
Objectives:
  1. Medical Students will participate in all aspects of Radiation Oncology including clinical treatment planning, treatment delivery, medical physics, dosimetry, simulation, and port film evaluation.
  2. Students will understand the natural history of cancers, the role of radiation therapy in the treatment of cancer, general principles of oncology, basic radiation safety, multidisciplinary patient care, specialized treatment procedures, clinic structure and supportive care.
  3. Students will learn how to conduct a thorough history and physical examination and how to examine patients to assess tumor response and progression.
  4. To enhance the clinical experience and further knowledge, students will be required to do some reading of textbooks and the medical literature as assigned by their preceptor(s).
Evaluation:
At the completion of the elective, training faculty and students will complete performance evaluations.
MCC
 1 - 6
Yr 4 Status
2
0
44
4
Dilling, Thomas
Clinical
Oncologic Sciences
 
MEL 7320G Externship - RadiationOncology
EXT
 1 - 7
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
40
4
Faculty
Externship
Oncologic Sciences
 
MEL 9999G Indep Study - RadiationOncology
USFMS
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
44
2,4
Faculty
Indep Study
Ophthal
 
 MEL 8501 Medical Ophthalmology
Contact:
Stacy Parker Deraps
sparkerd@health.usf.edu
Report to:
Stacy Parker Deraps in the USF Eye Institute
First day of rotation

This course teaches the ophthalmic signs and symptoms of systemic medical disease through lectures and patient examination. It includes participation in clinics as well as observation of ophthalmic surgery. Students are expected to attend departmental teaching conferences. They must present and discuss an interesting patient they have seen during their rotation at our case conference during the last week of their rotation. The course is oriented to those students who are primarily interested in the specialties of medicine, pediatrics, neurology, and ophthalmology.
USFMS
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
2
0
44
2,4
Madow, Brian
Clinical
Ophthal
 
 MEL 8501 Medical Ophthalmology
Contact:
Stacy Parker Deraps
sparkerd@health.usf.edu
Report to:
Stacy Parker Deraps in the USF Eye Institute
First day of rotation

This course teaches the ophthalmic signs and symptoms of systemic medical disease through lectures and patient examination. It includes participation in clinics as well as observation of ophthalmic surgery. Students are expected to attend departmental teaching conferences. They must present and discuss an interesting patient they have seen during their rotation at our case conference during the last week of their rotation. The course is oriented to those students who are primarily interested in the specialties of medicine, pediatrics, neurology, and ophthalmology.
USFMS
 9 - 11
None, Yr 3 dates
2
0
44
2,4
Madow, Brian
Clinical
Ophthal
 
 MEL 8501 Medical Ophthalmology
Prior Approval is Required.

Contact:

Robert Thompson, Practice Manager
LVPG Ophthalmology
Students will rotate through an outpatient ophthalmic office and will be exposed to general ophthalmology.  Students will learn how we use ophthalmic equipment and how to perform basic ophthalmic exam including direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy.  Students will learn how various medical conditions such as diabetes and hypertension affect the eyes.  Students will also learn how to recognize and treat primary ophthalmic conditions including dry eye syndrome, cataract, glaucoma, and macular degeneration.
Objectives:
  1. Learn how medical conditions affect the eyes
  2. Identify and treat basic ophthalmic conditions
  3. Perform a basic eye exam, including slit lamp exam, direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy
  4. Learn basics of ophthalmic equipment including topography, biometry, and visual field testing
  5. Learn how to triage ophthalmic complaints and learn when to refer and when to treat in a primary care setting
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
44
2,4
Saad, Christine
Clinical
Ophthal
 
 MEL 8506 Cornea/External Disease
Contact:
Stacy Parker Deraps
sparkerd@health.usf.edu
Report to:
Stacy Parker Deraps in the USF Eye Institute
First day of rotation
This course is designed for students interested in ophthalmology as a career. Students will participate in the cornea/external disease service. The course includes participation in cornea clinics and observation of corneal surgery. Clinical and laboratory methods used in the diagnosis and treatment of external diseases of the eye will be presented. Attendance at departmental conferences will be expected, and independent reading and investigation is encouraged. In the last week of the rotation, students are required to present and discuss a patient they have evaluated during the course at the departmental case conference.
USFMS
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
44
2,4
Espana, Edgar
Clinical
Ophthal
 
 MEL 8506 Cornea/External Disease
Contact:
Stacy Parker Deraps
sparkerd@health.usf.edu
Report to:
Stacy Parker Deraps in the USF Eye Institute
First day of rotation
This course is designed for students interested in ophthalmology as a career. Students will participate in the cornea/external disease service. The course includes participation in cornea clinics and observation of corneal surgery. Clinical and laboratory methods used in the diagnosis and treatment of external diseases of the eye will be presented. Attendance at departmental conferences will be expected, and independent reading and investigation is encouraged. In the last week of the rotation, students are required to present and discuss a patient they have evaluated during the course at the departmental case conference.
USFMS
 9 - 11
None, Yr 3 dates
1
0
44
2,4
Espana, Edgar
Clinical
Ophthal
 
 MEL 8507 Retinal Elective
Contact:
Stacy Parker Deraps
sparkerd@health.usf.edu
Report to:
Stacy Parker Deraps in the USF Eye Institute
First day of rotation

Students will evaluate patients with diabetic retinopathy, hypertensive retinopathy, senile macular degeneration, retinal detachments, intraocular tumors, and uveitis at the USF Eye Institute using direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and slit lamp examination of the fundus. Students will learn the interpretation of fundus fluorescein angiography and ultrasonography. They will participate in argon and krypton laser photocoagulation, intraocular injections, scleral buckles, vitrectomies, and radiation plaque therapy. For those interested in ophthalmology as a career, this course is an opportunity to learn the most advanced diagnostic and therapeutic techniques used in eye care today. Those interested in family practice, internal medicine, geriatrics, and endocrinology will see the retinal pathology most often encountered in their future specialty and learn the resources that are available for evaluation and treatment. In the last week of the rotation, the student is required to present and discuss a patient they have evaluated during the course at the departmental case conference.
Evaluation:
Evaluation will be determined by daily performance observed during the 4-week elective period.
USFMS
1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
44-70
2,4
Pavan, Peter
Clinical
Ophthal
 
 MEL 8507 Retinal Elective
Students will evaluate patients with diabetic retinopathy, hypertensive retinopathy, senile macular degeneration, retinal detachments, intraocular tumors, and uveitis at the USF Eye Institute using direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and slit lamp examination of the fundus. Students will learn the interpretation of fundus fluorescein angiography and ultrasonography. They will participate in argon and krypton laser photocoagulation, intraocular injections, scleral buckles, vitrectomies, and radiation plaque therapy. For those interested in ophthalmology as a career, this course is an opportunity to learn the most advanced diagnostic and therapeutic techniques used in eye care today. Those interested in family practice, internal medicine, geriatrics, and endocrinology will see the retinal pathology most often encountered in their future specialty and learn the resources that are available for evaluation and treatment. In the last week of the rotation, the student is required to present and discuss a patient they have evaluated during the course at the departmental case conference.
Evaluation:
Evaluation will be determined by daily performance observed during the 4-week elective period.
LVHN
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
44-70
2,4
Kazahaya, Masayuki
Clinical
Ophthal
 
 MEL 8507 Retinal Elective
Contact:
Stacy Parker Deraps
sparkerd@health.usf.edu
Report to:
Stacy Parker Deraps in the USF Eye Institute
First day of rotation

Students will evaluate patients with diabetic retinopathy, hypertensive retinopathy, senile macular degeneration, retinal detachments, intraocular tumors, and uveitis at the USF Eye Institute using direct and indirect ophthalmoscopy and slit lamp examination of the fundus. Students will learn the interpretation of fundus fluorescein angiography and ultrasonography. They will participate in argon and krypton laser photocoagulation, intraocular injections, scleral buckles, vitrectomies, and radiation plaque therapy. For those interested in ophthalmology as a career, this course is an opportunity to learn the most advanced diagnostic and therapeutic techniques used in eye care today. Those interested in family practice, internal medicine, geriatrics, and endocrinology will see the retinal pathology most often encountered in their future specialty and learn the resources that are available for evaluation and treatment. In the last week of the rotation, the student is required to present and discuss a patient they have evaluated during the course at the departmental case conference.
Evaluation:
Evaluation will be determined by daily performance observed during the 4-week elective period.
USFMS
 9 - 11
None, Yr 3 dates
1
0
44-70
2,4
Pavan, Peter
Clinical
Ophthal
 
 MEL 8509 Glaucoma
Contact:
Stacy Parker Deraps
sparkerd@health.usf.edu
Report to:
Stacy Parker Deraps in the USF Eye Institute
First day of rotation

 

This course is designed for students interested in ophthalmology as a career. Glaucoma is one of the most common clinical problems ophthalmologists encounter. Its diagnosis and treatment will be taught through participation in clinics and surgery. Attendance at departmental conferences is expected as is independent reading. Participation in a research project is encouraged. During the last week of the rotation, presentation of an interesting patient or the results of a research project at the departmental teaching conference is required.
USFMS
 1 - 11
Yr 4 Status
1
0
40
2,4
Richards, David
Clinical
Ophthal
 
 MEL 8509 Glaucoma
Contact:
Stacy Parker Deraps
sparkerd@health.usf.edu
Report to:
Stacy Parker Deraps in the USF Eye Institute
First day of rotation

 

This course is designed for students interested in ophthalmology as a career. Glaucoma is one of the most common clinical problems ophthalmologists encounter. Its diagnosis and treatment will be taught through participation in clinics and surgery. Attendance at departmental conferences is expected as is independent reading. Participation in a research project is encouraged. During the last week of the rotation, presentation of an interesting patient or the results of a research project at the departmental teaching conference is required.
USFMS
 9 - 11
None, Yr 3 dates
1
0
40
2,4
Richards, David
Clinical
Ophthal
 
MEL 7320E Externship - Ophthalmology
EXT
 1 - 7
Yr 4 Status
No Limit
0
44
4
Faculty
Externship
Ophthal
 
MEL 9999E Indep Study - Ophthalmology
USFMS
 1 - 11
None
No Limit
0
44
2,4
Faculty
Indep Study
Ortho
 
 MDT 8600C Intro to Orthopaedic Peds
Attendings:
Paul Benfanti, MD – Site Director

Scott W. Beck, MD
Jeff B. Neustadt, MD
Gregory V. Hahn, MD
Drew Warnick, MD
Debi Mitchell – Office Coordina